Historic Hillsdale Michigan

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Our Founding Fathers: Ancestors and Descendants of the Three Kroh Sisters

A Family History in Dictionary Form

 

Part I

The Kroh Line

Forward

What a fascinating bloodline! The ancestors listed here were amazing people. There is a splash of royalty, blacksmiths, clergy, and farmers, the Captain of a Phantom Ship, (immortalized by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), phantom fortunes, and several founders of towns. There is a strong presence in the Pennsylvania Dutch, who, interestingly, are not Dutch at all, but German. “Pennsylvania Dutch” is a corruption of “Pennsylvania Deutch”.  I especially love the Puritan and biblical names …Titus …Thankful… Balthasar…Nehemiah…Gideon…Hasadiah, etc.

As the wife of Michael Baker Sr. (son of Ruth Kroh Baker), I am not of this bloodline. However, I am a contributor to this bloodline.

I find this line to be captivating. It seems that many people in this line have had an interest in following it, and it has been fairly simple to tap into their research online. That being said, I can not verify the information, as I did not have a hand in most of the research. I followed one line that took me all the way back to Adam and Eve! I personally feel that this is where it would end up, but in spite of the fact that many people in this line were prominent citizens in their community, I doubt that every generation had someone of such import that their passage was documented, and that none of said records were ever lost. So, I must stress that I take no credit nor accept blame for the accuracy of the following record. I did take great pains to check where I could, and there are many original sources online. As for spelling, when our country was founded, a great many people could not spell their own names, and did not have a clue if the person who was recording their name spelled it “correctly”. Frankly, there was no correct way to spell a name, and the person keeping the records that day wrote down what he heard, sometimes from someone who did not speak English. He may have written “Syndarela”, or…”Cinderella”. The only way to check ancestry is by dates of births, deaths, and marriages, and by the spouse’s name.

My thanks to the late Ruth Kroh Baker and her ancestors, who kept very good track of their family history.

Format:

Because this line is so very vast, I will have a side bar, detailing a straight line descendancy omitting all persons who do not have a blood link to the person being detailed, which will hopefully make it easier to understand where this particular person fits into the line. I will bring everyone down to the parents of the Kroh sisters, Alfred and Gladys (Burdick) Kroh. The spouse will have their own entry. Ancestors in the bloodline are bolded.

Example:

Johann Simon Groh (who is father of):

Henry Kroh (who is father of):

Jacob Kroh (who is father of):

Daniel Bernard Kroh (who is father of):

Jacob Henry Kroh (who is father of:)

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

There will be no italicized “father of” or “mother of” in the text. I am limiting this record to immigrant ancestors and their offspring, with a few minor exceptions. The format will include the name, followed by the person’s ancestors back to the first person in America with that surname (or the earliest person I could find). There will be a hyperlink to the ancestor’s section. Example: Joe Blow (John3,Jack2,Jeff1), which should be read: Joe Blow (son of John, the third generation in America, son of Jack, the second generation in America, son of Jeff, the first generation in America)

Because with many people, we don’t have much more information about them than a few dates, I have researched what was going on in the world during this person’s lifetime, and included illustrations of life and fashion of the period.

 

Double Dating: not what you’d think.

Double dating was used in Great Britain, colonial British America, and British possessions to clarify dates occurring between 1 January and 24 March on years between 1582 and 1752. In the ecclesiastical or legal calendar, March 25th was recognized as the first day of the year and was not double dated.

Researchers of colonial American ancestors will often see double dating in older records. Double dates were identified with a slash mark (/) representing the Old and New Style calendars, e.g., 1690/1691. Even before 1752 in colonial America, some educated clerks knew of the calendar change in Europe and used double dating to distinguish between the calendars. This was especially true in civil records, but less so in church registers. Researchers will often see this type of double dating in New England town records, court records, church records, and wills, or on colonial gravestones or cemetery transcriptions. The system of double dating ended in 1752 in the American colonies with the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

Double Dating Examples in Colonial Records

15 January 1690 or 15 January 1691
15 February 1745 or 15 February 1746
1 March 1749 or 1 March 1750
15 March 1700 or 15 March 1701

Quaker Dating
After 1752, Quakers adjusted to the calendar change by calling January the first month (N.S. calendar), February the second month, December the twelfth month, and so forth. However, even with the calendar change, dates will undoubtedly appear a little complicated for researchers.

Quakers almost exclusively used numbers for months. In some cases, researchers will find the number and name of the month, such as “4th month called June” or “the 10th day of the 10th month called December 1690.” Any date in March was considered the first month. And Sunday was the first day of the week, Monday the second day, and so forth.

Quakers also wrote numbers in their meeting records, such as “3rd month” instead of May (an example before 1752). Saying July (Julius), after Julius Caesar, or August, after the Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus, was considered too pagan or worldly.

An example of an early Quaker date might be: 2/10/1720 (with 2 being the second month). This date should be interpreted as 10 April 1720. For examples of Quaker dating practices, see the article by Gordon L. Remington, “Quaker Preparation for the 1752 Calendar Change,” National Genealogical Society Quarterly 87 (June 1999): 146-150.

Alphabetical Index

Alling, John 1671-1734 Father of Six …………………………….……………………………………………………9

Alling, Mary 1693-1784 “Love Child” Mother of Six …………………….………………………………………….10

Alling, Roger  1612-1674 Immigrant Ancestor,1St Treasurer Colony of New Haven, Deacon,

Blacksmith, Farmer ………………………………………………………………………………………..………….10

Alling, Samuel  1645-1709 Treasurer of the New Haven Colony, Blacksmith……………………………………….14

Austin, Elizabeth  1626-1680 English Immigrant …………………………………………………………………….15

Deborah Bachiler Abt. 1592-Bef. 1680 English Immigrant “The Matriarch of Sandwich” ………………………….16

Rev. Stephen Bachiler Abt. 1561-1656 English Immigrant, Famous Clergyman,

Founder of Hampton, NH………………………………………………………………………………………………18

Baker, Margery Bef. 1600-Abt. 1656 English Immigrant …………………………………………………………….20

The Beardlseys…………………………………………………………………………………………………………21

Beardsley, Joseph 1634-1712 English Immigrant at age 6 Months; Loved the Sea …………………………………..22

Beardsley, Mary 1712-Aft. 1747……………………………………………………………………………………….21

Beardsley, Thomas 1674-1773 Farmer ……………………………….…..……………………………………………23

Beardlsy, William 1605-1661 English Immigrant, Named Stanford, CT, Mason …………………..………………..24

Beverly, Jane Married in 1754 in New Hampshire …………………………………………………………………….26

Blackwell, Mary Abt 1609-Abt.1662 English Immigrant, Mother of 10………………………………………………27

The Bradleys ……………………………………………..……………………………………………………………28

Bradley, Martha  1648-1692/93 Mother of 10……….……………………..………………………………………….28

Bradley, Sarah 1665-1742 Mother of 7….……………………………………………….……………………………29

Bradley, William 1619-1691 English Immigrant Ancestor, First Settler in North Haven, CT. ………………..……..30

The Brocketts ……………………………………………………………………….………………………………………31

Brockett, Anna (Hulda Earl Brockett.)1715-1762 Mother of 13…………………………………………………………………………35

Brockett, John 1609-1690 Graduate of Cambridge, English Immigrant, Founder of New

Haven & Wallingford CT and Elizabethtown NJ, Appointed Surgeon during King Phillips War…………………….36

Brockett, John 1685-1753………………………………………………………..…………………………………… 42

Brown, Nancy 1812-1873 Canadian Immigrant, Mother of Ten ……………….…………………………………….42

Bunnell, Lydia 1647-1708 Indentured Servant ………………………………..………………………………………44

Bunnell, William Abt. 1610-1674 Wuss English Immigrant Ancestor, Farmer, Tanner,

Mechanic, and Burden to Society………………………………..…………………………………………………….45

Butcher, Elizabeth 1625-Abt. 1685 English Immigrant Ancestress……………………………………………………46

Carter, Ursula 1590-1666 English Immigrant Ancestress ……………………………………………………………..47

Cleverly, Elizabeth Abt. 1629-1681 English Immigrant Ancestress, Young Love, Mother of 6……………..………48

Cook, Christopher 1562-1640 English Immigrant Ancestor …………………………………………………………………..49

Cook, Christopher 1603-1676 English Immigrant Ancestor……………………………………………………………49

Cook, Joanne 1620-1679 Quaker ………………………………………………………………………………………50

Cooks, Elizabeth 1604-1769 English Immigrant Ancestress………………….………………………………………51

The Coopers………………………………………..………………………………………………………………….51

Cooper, John 1610-1689 English Immigrant, Founding Family of New Haven,

Town Whiner and Crier…………………………………………………………………………………………………52

Cooper, John 1642-1703 Proprietor of New Haven…………………………………………………………………….54

Cooper, Sarah 1673-1736 Mother of 9………………………………………………………………………………….55

Crowell, Sarah Abt. 1592-1659  Mother of 11…………………………………………………………………………56

Dayton, Phoebe –Abt. 1720 Mother of 8……………………………………………………………………………….57

The Denmans……………………………………………………………………………………………………………58

Denman, John Abt. 1621-1691 English Immigrant……………………………………………………………………..59

Denman, Philip 1644-1698……………………………………………………………………………………………..59

DeWolf, Balthasar 1620-1696 Immigrant, Witch Hunter, Tavern Keeper, First Settler……….………..………….…61

DeWolfe, Edward  1646-1712 Carpenter, Millwright and Owner, Tavern Keeper ………………..…………………63

DeWolfe, Hannah  Abt. 1676-1755 Did Her Best to People the Colonies..……………………………………………64

Dillingham Deborah 1660-Aft. 1731………………………………………………..…………………………………65

Dillingham, Edward 1595-1667 Founding Family of Sandwich, MA……………..……………………………….…65

Dillingham, Henry 1624-1705 English Immigrant Ancestor …………………………………………………………67

Dimic, Sarah 1682-Aft. 1773……………………..…………………………………………………………………….68

Edwards, Mary Est. 1685-1751……………………………………………………………….……………………….68

Earls, Huldah Abt. 1700-1757 Mother of Ten………………………………………………………….……………..69

Elilthorpe, Mary Katherine1592-1688 English Immigrant, Founding Family of Milford, CT…….……….…………69

Family History Search Tips……………………………..……………………….……………………………………….

Famous Cousins…………………………………….…………………….…………………………………………..309

French and Indian Wars…………………………….………………….……………………………………………..304

French, Elizabeth 1664-1739………………………………………….…………….………………………………….70

French, Francis Abt. 1625-1691 English Immigrant Ancestor…………….……….………………………………….71

French, William Abt. 1605-1681 English Immigrant, Deacon, Author, Tailor, Servant………………………………72

Gridley, Alice 1735-1821………………………………………………………………………………………………76

Gidley, Henry -1678 English Immigrant Ancestor…………………..………………………………………………..77

Gidley, Henry1693-1773……………………………….………..…………………………………………………….78

Gidley, Hezekiah 1664 – Before 1705………………………………………….…..…………………………………78

Hager, David 1712-1769 German Immigrant, Co-Founder of Hagerstown, MD.……………….……………………79

Hager, Dorothea Abt. 1751- Aft. 1830……………………..………………………………………………………….80

Harrison, Ellen 1621-1690 English Immigrant………………..……….………………………………………………80

Harrison, Richard 1595-1653 English Immigrant…………………..…………………………………………………81

Harvey, Mary 1605-Aft 1668 English Immigrant, Founding Family of Stratford, CT Mother of 12………………….…..81

Hart, Sarah 1625/26-1697 English Immigrant, Mother of 14…………………………………………………………..82

Hart, Steven Abt. 1605-1693 English Immigrant………………………………..…………………………………….83

Hill, George 1578-1649 English Immigrant…….…………………………….……………………………………….83

Hill(s), Margery 1690 English Immigrant………….…………………………………………………….……………86

Hitchcock, Edward 1614-Abt.1657/58 English Immigrant, Baptized by Rev. John Davenport…….………….……..87

Hitchcock, Mary 1638- Aft. 1679…………………………….…………………………….………………………….88

Holmes, Jane  -1711 Had Illegitimate Child………………….……….……………………………………………….88

Holmes, Judah ……………………………………………….…………………….…………………………………..89

Holt, Elizabeth 1608 -1683 English Immigrant …………….……….………………………………   ………………89

Holt, Joseph 1655-1697…………………………………..…………………………………………………………….90

Holt, Mary 1693-1729…………………………………………..………………………………………………………91

Holt, William 1610-1683 English Immigrant, Signed New Haven Colony Constitution……………….…………….91

Hotchkiss, Charity 1761-1851 Mother of Eleven …………………………………………………………………….101

Hotchkiss, Gideon1716-1807Served in French and Indian War and Revolutionary War……………………………101

Hotchkiss, Jesse  1738-1776 Died in Revolutionary War, Leaving 11 Children…………………………………….106

Hotchkiss, Joshua 1651-1722 Ensign, Sheriff, Deacon; Westville CT’s First Settler……………….……………….107

Hotchkiss, Samuel English Immigrant Founding Family of New Haven CT: Love Hurts!…………………………………..108

Hotchkiss, Stephen 1681-1755 Deacon………………………………………………………………………………109

Howell, Anne  Est.1590-Est. 1631, English Immigrant ………………………………………………………………110

Hubler, Susannah 1720/21-1804 German Fräulein……………………………………………………………………110

Hyde, Hester Abt. 1625-1703 English Immigrant Ancestress………………………………………………………..111

Hyde, William Abt 1569-1637 English Immigrant, Founding Family of Norwich and Hartford, CT……………….112

Hyde, William 1600-1680/81 English Immigrant, Founding Family of Norwich and Hartford, CT……………..…113

Kantner, Anna Catherine 1741-1804……………………………………………………………………………………..115

Kanter, Hans Jacob Abt. 1685-1742 German Immigrant Ancestor……………………………………………………………………116

Kanter, Johan Jacob 1716-1791 German Immigrant Ancestor, Farmer……………………………………………………………..116

Kerschner, Katharina 1721-Aft 1759 German Immigrant, Mother of Eight………………….…………………………..118

Kiesecker, Elizabeth 1773-……………………………………………………………………………………………….119

Kiesecker, Philip Sr. 1719-Abt 1777 German Immigrant ……………………………………………………………….119

Kiesecker, Philip Jr. Abt.1751-1821 ……………………………………………………………………………………..119

King Phillips War……………………………………….……………………………………………………………304

Kroh Descendants List…………………………………..……………………………………………………………322

Kroh Family Album…………………………………..………………………………………………………………314

Kroh, Alfred Alonzo 1884-1961 Farmer, Father of the Three Kroh Sisters…………………………………………..120

Kroh, Daniel Bernard 1832-1916 Hog Farmer, Steam Works Owner   …………………..………………..………..122

Kroh, Henry 1764-1823 ………………………………………………..…………………………………………….124

Kroh, Jacob Fought in the War of 1812 Farmer, Justice of the Peace, Father of 18………………..………………..126

Kroh, Jacob Henry 1847-1945 Hog Farmer, Oddfellow……………………………..……………………………….128

Kroh (Groh), Simon Bef 1740 – Bef. 22 Jun 1772 German Immigrant …………………..………………………….129

Ladd, Ann 1592-1668 English Immigrant …………………………………………………………………………………………………….134

Lamberton, Elizabeth 1632-1716 English Immigrant, No Stranger to Tragedy ……………………..………………136

Lamberton, George Est. 1610-1646 Captain, Lost at Sea in a Phantom Ship, English Immigrant

Founding Family of New Haven…………………………………………..…………………………………………137

Lauer, Susanna Barbara 1705-Bef 1748 German Immigrant, Mother of Nine…………………..……………..……139

Lees, Sarah 1604-1661 Dutch Immigrant Ancestress………………………………………………………………………………………141

Lewen, Margaret 1614-1655 English Immigrant, Widowed with 7 Children…………..……………………………141

Lutz, Anna Maria Catherina Abt. 1690-Aft. 1732 German Immigrant……………..…………….………………….142

The Mallorys………………………………..…………………………………………………………………………143

Mallory, Charity  Abt 1724-1826 Widowed with 10 Children………………………………………………………..143

Mallory, Peter Bef. 1625-1698/99 English Immigrant, Chimney Sweep, Planter,& Speculator…………………..…144

Mallory, Peter 1653-1720……………………………………………………………………………………………..145

Mallory, Peter 1708-1826 Plus notes on the Revolution……………..………………………………………………146

Mansfield, Joseph 1636-1692 English Immigrant Ancestor……………………..…………………………………..148

Mansfield, Martha  1660-1730 Mother of Fourteen…………………………………………………………………..149

Marbury, Rebecca 1604-1656 English Immigrant Ancestress ………………………………………………………151

Marshall, Elizabeth 1602-Abt. 1641 English Immigrant Ancestress…………………………………………………152

Maxfield, Amanda Malvina 1811-1881 Mother of Fourteen…………………………………………………………153

Maxon, John 1586-1643 English Immigrant Ancestor……………………………………………………………….154

Maxon, Lydia 1610-1718 English Immigrant Ancestress……………………………………………………………154

Maxon, Rebecca 1640-1708 Married her first cousin……………..…………………………………………………155

Maxon, Richard 1602- Abt. 1643 English Immigrant, Founding Family of Portsmouth, Founded

7th day Baptist Church, Blacksmith…………………………………………………………………………………..156

Metzger Von Weibnom, Barbara Dutch Royalty, Immigrant Ancestress…………………………………………………………..157

Mew, Johannah 1611-1678 English Immigrant Ancestress………………………………………………………….158

Miles, Martha 1632-1662 English Immigrant Ancestress……………………………………………………………158.

Miles, Richard Abt. 1610-1666 English Immigrant, Deacon, Judge, Farmer…………………………………………160

Mitchell, Sibil Est. 1571-1596-Est. 1613-1685 English Immigrant, Founding Family of Milford, CT……………..162

Monroe, Lois Isabel 1588- Twice an Ancestress…………………….……………………………………………….162

Morgan, Hannah 1642-Unknown…………………………………………………………………………………….163

Morgan, James Abt. 1607-1685 Immigrant, Surveyor One of the 1st Settlers of Groton, CT……………………….163

Moshers, The………………………………………………………………………………………………………….167

Mosher Daniel Abt. 1660-1751……………………………………………………………………………………….168

Mosher George 1717-1784 Quaker, Cordwainer………………………………………………………………….….169

Mosher Hugh 1632-1713 Reverend, Blacksmith……………………………………………………………………..170

Mosure, Nicholas 1596- English Immigrant…………………………………………………………………………..172

Mosher Ruth 1770- 1847 Mother of Nine…………………………………………………………………………….172

Mosher Samuel 1742-1815 Farmer ………………………………………………………………………………………173

Mott, Adam  English Immigrant Ancestor,Tailor……………………………………………………………………………………………175

Mott, Hannah 1663- 1730………………………………………………………………………………………..………..175

Mott, Jacob 1633-1711 English Immigrant, Quaker Preacher…………………………………………………………176

Mott, John English Immigrant Ancestor, ?-Prob. 1656…………………………….……………………………..….177

Moulthrop, Hanna 1665-1712………………………………………………………..……………………………….178

Moulthrop Matthew 1608-1668 English Immigrant, Fought the Indian Wars……………………..………….……..178

Moulthrop Matthew 1633/34- 1690/91 English Immigrant ……………….…………………………………..…….179

Munsons, The…………………………………………………..……………………………………………………..180

Munson, Elizabeth 1695- 1765………………………….……………………………………………………………180

Munson, John 1672-Bef.1752 Deacon, Captain, Miller, Surveyor……………………………………….…….……181

Munson, Samuel 1643-1692/93 Shoemaker, Deacon, Auditor, Selectman, Treasurer,

Leather-Sealer, Schoolmaster, Envoy to the Governor, Constable, Dummer, Ensign……………….…  …………..182

Munson, Thomas 1612-1685 English Immigrant, Military Captain, Carpenter,

Foreman of the first trial by jury in America…………………………………………………………………………184

Nash, Mary Abt. 1621- 1683 English Immigrant…………………………………………………………….………186

Nash, Thomas 1589-1658 English Immigrant, Commander, Blacksmith, Gunsmith…………….………………….187

Nicholl, Jane 1605-1672 English Immigrant ………………..……………………………………………………….190

Pardee, George 1624-1700 English Immigrant…………………..…………………………………………………..191

Pardee, Mary 1658-1684………………………………………………………………………………………………191

Parmelees, The…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Parmelee, Alonzo T. (1835/36-1881) Farmer………………..……………………………………………………….193

Parmelee, Erastus K. (1809-1896) Farmer, Founder of Parmelee, MI……………….………………………………196

Parmelee, Frances 1862-1941…………………..……………………………………………………………………..199

Parmelee, Jehiel Lieutenant 1718-1776 Fought/Died during the Revolutionary War

from smallpox, caught while nursing his brother…………..………………………………………………………..199

Parmelee, John  1584-1659 Immigrant Patriarch of the American Parmelees: buried 4 wives

and 9 of his 13 children……..…………………………………….…………………………………………………,201

Parmelee, John  1612-1687/88Drummer, Sexton, Planter……………………………………………………………204

Parmelee, Joshua  1661-1729 Farmer ( Married Hannah De Wolf)…………………………………………………………………..207

Parmelee, Joshua 1743/44-1780 Ensign, Served in Revolutionary War (Married Rebecca)…………………………209

Parmelee, Joshua 1780-1834 ( Married Eunice Smith)……………………………………………………………….209

Wealthy (maiden name unknown, married Erastus K. Parmelee)…………………………………………………….211

Panton, Eleanore 1605-1670 Welsh Immigrant Ancestress…………………………………………………………..212

Peck, Alice Abt.1626-Abt.1687 English Immigrant …………………………………………………………………212

Peck, William (Deacon) 1601-1694 English Immigrant, Deacon, New Haven First Family…………………..……213

Perkins, The Family………………………….………………………………………………………………………..215

Perkins, Aaron 1700-1763……………………………………………………………………………………………215

Perkins, Edward 1625-Abt 1679 English Immigrant Farmer…………………………………………………………216

Perkins, John 1651-Bef. 1730 Farmer…………………………………………………………………………………217

Perkins, Mary  (1734-1806) Mother of 8………………………………………………………………………………217

Perry, Edmund1587/88- Aft. 1671 English Immigrant, Leading Quaker, Author……………………………………218

Perry, Hannah Abt. 1630-1673 English Immigrant …………………………………………………………………..220

Picke, Margaret 1598-1655 English Immigrant …………………………..…………………………………………221

Plaine, Hannah 1638-1687/88……………………….…………………………………..……………………………222

Plaine, William 1590-1646 English Immigrant, First Person Executed in New Haven….……………..……………223

Plum, Anna Abt 1600-1658 Sad Life………………..……………………………………………………………….224

Porter, Mary 1677-1739……………………………………………………………………………………………….225

Porter, Thomas1620/21-1697 Immigrant, Deacon Married the Girl Next Door, Father of 14………………………..225

Post, Elizabeth 1654/55-1715 Married Three Times………………………………………………………………….226

Post, John 1629-1710 English Immigrant, Married the Girl Next Door…………………..…………………………227

Post, Stephen 1596-1659 English Immigrant, Founding Family of Hartford, Carpenter……………………………..229

Potter, Mary 1641-1701……………………………………………………………………………………………….229

Potter, William Abt. 1608-1662 Immigrant Ancestor…………………………………………………………………230

Preston, Mary 1629-1690 English Immigrant Ancestress…………………………………………………………….233

Preston, William 1590/91-1647 English Immigrant, Church Warden, Solicitor,

Founding Family of New Haven………………………………………………………………………………….…..234

Prichard, Alice 1624-1671 Twice an Ancestress……………………………………………………………………..235

Prichard, Roger Abt. 1600-1670, Welsh Immigrant ……………………………………………………………..…..236

Prudden, Elizabeth 1615-1666 Immigrant Ancestress………………………………………………………………..237

Prudden, James 1591-1648 English Immigrant………………………………………………………………………237

Puritans, The………………………………………………………………………………………………………….….8

Richard, Anna Barbara 1764-1823……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….238

Quakers, The……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..291

Rieth/Reith, Margaretha Elisabetha 1730-1761 Mother of Ten………………………………………………………240

Royce Family, The……………………………………………………………………………………………………240

Royce, Joseph 1663-1707/08………………………………………………………………………………………….241

Royce, Mary 1722/23-1777………………………………………………………..…………………………………241

Royce, Nehemiah Abt. 1637-1706 English Immigrant, Carpenter, Shoemaker, Joiner, Blacksmith,

Met George Washington…………………………………..………………………………………………………………242

Royce, Robert 1603-1676 English Immigrant, Shoemaker, Constable……………………………………….………244

Royce, Thomas 1692-1761………………..………………………………………………………………………….245

Russell, John 1664-1723/24……….………………………………………………………………………………….245

Russell, Nicholas1708-1741…………………….……………………………………………………………………246

Russell (Jr.), Nicholas 1734-1798…………………….………………………………………………………………247

Russell, Ophelia Abt. 1838-1914……………………………………………………………………………………..247

Russell, Ralph 1644-1679…………………………………………………………………………………………….249

Russell, Riverus 1756-1834 Fought in the Revolutionary War………………………………………………………249

Russell, Riverus (Verus) Jr. 1805-1862………………………………………………………………………………251

Russell, William B. 1680/83-1739……………………………………………………………………………………252

Shepard, Benjamin Lived in New Hampshire in the mid 1700’s……………………………………………………..254

Shepard, Benjamin 1767-1813………………………………………………………………………………………..254

Shepard, Hanna L. 1834-1914……………………………………………………………………..…………………255

Shepard, Israel  1807-1873 Colonel in State Militia, Farmer, Named Montgomery County, MI……………..……..255

Sherman, Elizabeth 1702/03-Abt.1765…………………..………………………………………………………..….256

Slocum, Giles 1623-1683 English Immigrant, Quaker, Land Baron………………………………………………………………….257

Slocum, Joanna 1624-1727 English Immigrant, Mother of 7…………….…………………………………………..259

Slough,Hasaiah Abt. 1648-Bef. 1743…………………………………………………………………………………260

Slough, William 1612-1653 English Immigrant, Executed ………………………………………………………….260

Smith, Eunice 1780-1834……………………….…………………………………………………………………….261

Sperrys, The…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..262

Sperry, Elizabeth1683-1760 Mother of Thirteen……………………………………………………………………..264

Sperry, John 1649-1692 Proprietor of New Haven………………..…………………………………………………264

Sperry, Martha 1685/85-1758…………………………………………………………………………………………265

Sperry, Richard  English Immigrant, Farmer, Defender of the Regicides 2X Ancestor……………..………………265

Sperry, Richard 1651/52-1734…………………………….….………………………………………………………267

Stoughton, Judith 1591-1639 English Immigrant………….…………………………………………………………269

Swift, Hannah Abt. 1620-1664………….……………………………………………………………………………270

(Swift), Jone Abt. 1600-abt. 1663 English Immigrant, Prominent Community Member, Quakeress………….……271

Swift, William 1589-Abt. 1642 English Immigrant Proprietor of Watertown, MA…………………………………272

Symmes, Elizabeth Abt 1605- 1668 English Immigrant……………………………………………………………..274

Symons, Elizabeth Abt. 1617-1678 English Immigrant………………………………………………………………274

Symonds, Mary Abt. 1578-English Immigrant, Widow, Mother of 9……………………………………………….275

Theiss, John Matthias 1704-1748 German Immigrant, Blacksmith………………………………………………….278

Thompson, Hannah Abt. 1643-1712………………………………………………………………………………….276

Thompson, John 1613-1655 English Immigrant, “The Farmer” …………………………………………………….276

Thompson, Mary 1642-1714 …………………………………………………………………………………………277

Tice, Johann Michael 1727/28-1804, Major………………………………………………………………………….279

Tice, John 1770-1833…………………………………………………………………………………………………280

Tice, Sara 1801-1827………………………………………………………………………………………………….281

Tinker, Rebecca 1648-1722…………………………………………………………………………………………..281

Trott, Hester Abt 1609-1682 English Immigrant……………………………………………………………………..283

Trowbridge, Elizabeth 1661-1732…………………………………………………………………………………….283

Trowbridge, William 1633-Abt. 1690 English Immigrant, Planter and Husbandman, Ships Master….…….………284

Tucker Abraham 1653-1725………………………….…………….…………………………………………………285

Tucker, Henry Abt 1619-1694 Immigrant Ancestor, Quaker…….………..…………………………………………286

Tucker Sarah 1693-1727…………..………………………….………………………………………………………287

Wilmot, Ann 1621-1654 Immigrant Ancestress Abandoned by Her Husband, Lived in Poverty……………………288

Wilmont, Benjamin AKA Willmote 1589-1669,English Immigrant………………………………………………….289

Wing Daniel Abt. 1616/17-1697/98 English Immigrant, Quaker………..…………………………………………..292

Wing Daniel 1664/65-Abt. 1738………….………………………………………………………………………….296

Wing Edward 1687- 1733/34………….…………………………………………………….………………………..297

Wing Hannah  abt. 1719-1784 First White Child Born in “New England”, Mother of 7……………………………298

Winston, Elizabeth 1649- 1682………………………………………………………………………………………299

Winston, John Abt. 1621-1697 English Immigrant, Sergeant ……………………………………………………….300

Woolen, John 1575-1689 English Immigrant …….………………………………………………………………….301

Woolen, Mary 1614- 1668 English Immigrant ………………………………………………………………………303

 

 

The Puritans

 

 The Puritans were fiercely anti-Catholic and believed that churches should be plain and free from all kinds of ornament. They believed that all mankind was basically sinful, but that some would be saved because of Christ’s death. Central to their belief was the act of conversion. Conversion could take two forms – either a blinding flash during which the converted could cry out or fall to the ground – or it could be the end result of a period of preparation. Puritans believed that discipline was a vital part of human life and that frivolity was a sign of giving in to temptation.

No Horse Racing, cock-fighting and bear baiting!

Any gathering of people without permission is forbidden!

No drunkenness and swearing!

No theatre-going, dancing and singing!

No games and sports on Sundays (including going for a walk)!

No gambling!

No visiting brothels!

Puritan dress

Puritans advocated a conservative form of fashionable attire, characterized by “sad” or somber colors and modest cuts. Gowns with low necklines were filled in with high-necked smocks and wide collars. Married women covered their hair with a linen cap, over which they might wear a tall black hat. Men and women both avoided bright colors, shiny fabrics, and over-ornamentation.

Contrary to popular belief, most Puritans and Calvinists did not wear black for everyday, especially in England, Scotland, and colonial America. Black dye was expensive and faded quickly, and black clothing was reserved for the most formal occasions (including having one’s portrait painted), for elders in a community, and for those of higher rank. Richer puritans, like their Dutch Calvinist contemporaries, probably did wear it often, but in silk, often patterned. More typical colors for most were brown, murrey (mulberry, a brownish-maroon), dull greens, and tawny colors. Wool and linen were preferred over silks and satins, though Puritan women of rank wore modest amounts of lace and embroidery as appropriate to their station, believing that the various ranks of society were divinely ordained and should be reflected even in the most modest dress. William Perkins wrote “…that apparel is necessary for Scholar, the Tradesman, the Countryman, the Gentleman; which serveth not only to defend their bodies from cold, but which belongs also to the place, degree, calling, and condition of them all” (Cases of Conscience, 1616).

 

The Allings

 

The name Alling is very ancient and originally written Alwyne, signifying "beloved by all." It is a very common name in England and invariably spelled Allen. Some of the branches reverted to the original form used by their grandfather, James Allen.

Jon (John) Alling

     1671-1734

Father of Six

 

John Alling

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John Alling (Samuel2,Roger1) was born on 27 Mar 1671 in New Haven, CT. to Samuel Alling and Elizabeth Winston. On 20 Mar 1689 when John was 17, he married twenty year old Abigail Grannis, daughter of Edward Grannis (ca 1630-10 Dec 1719) & Hannah Wakefield (29 Dec 1644-ca 1711), in New Haven, CT.  Abigail was born about 1669, and died in Elizabeth, NJ. On 23 Apr 1734, he died in Elizabeth. Burial: First Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth Union County New Jersey. Tombstone at 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, 42 Broad St. Elizabeth, NJ.

 

From the Book:
INSCRIPTIONS on Tombstones and Monuments in the BURYING GROUNDS of The First Presbyterian Church  And St. Johns Church at ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY. 1664-1892. Library of Congress #0 014 206 270 7

On 26 Aug 1693, he had an illegitimate child with Jane Holmes. Jane later married, and died in 1711 in New Haven, CT.

Like court proceedings, punishment in colonial America was a public event intended to discourage other individuals from committing crimes against the social order. Whipping, the most common form of punishment, generally attracted an audience. Whipping posts were located next to the courthouse so punishment could be carried out quickly following the trial. The goal was repentance of the convicted along with swift lessons for the whole audience.

Besides whipping, branding, cutting off ears, and placing people in the pillory were common publicly administered punishments that set examples for others. As described in noted author Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel The Scarlet Letter (1850), men and women convicted of certain crimes had to wear letters such as a capital A on their clothing in clear view for conviction of adultery (a married person having sexual relations with someone other than his or her spouse) or a B branded on their forehead for burglary. Banishment was a more extreme punishment.

Though less prevalent than the other forms of punishment, hangings also occurred in public places. The convicted were expected to publicly confess while standing on the gallows just prior to their hanging. Many of those attending considered the hangings to be deep spiritual experiences. Executions were far less common in the colonies than in England. An exception was execution for the crime of adultery. Murder and rape were the main capital offenses as well as repeat offenders in other serious crimes. Use of the death penalty varied among the colonies and was more commonly used in the southern colonies, particularly when applied to slaves in the eighteenth century.

Child of John Alling and Jane Holmes is:

Mary Alling (26 Aug 1693-1784)

The children of John Alling and Abigail Grannis are:

Abigail Alling b: 9 JAN 1689/90

  1. Lydia? Alling b: ABT 1692
  2. Thankful? Alling b: ABT 1694
  3. Abigail Alling b: ABT 1700 d: JUN 1771 (Married Daniel Smith b: 4 JUL 1693 d: 6 JAN 1771)
  4. Kezia Alling  (married John Plumb b: ABT 1704 d: 1763)

(“Inscription Tombstones Elizabeth NJ” by Wheeler Sea. Lib. R929.5W569i)

“A History and Genealogical Record of the Alling-Allens Of New Haven, CT, Descendants of Roger Alling, First, and John Alling, Sen., From 1639 to the Present Time.

 

Mary Alling

     1693-1784

“Love Child”

Mother of Six

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Alling (John3,Samuel2,Roger1) was born on 26 Aug. 1693 in New Haven, the illegitimate child of John Alling and Jane Holmes. When Mary was 30, she married Aaron Perkins, son of John Perkins and Mary in New Haven. Mary died in 1784 at the age of 91.

 

Her father, John Alling was 22 (and married to Abigail Grannis) when she was born, and her mother Jane was 19. In England during that time, less than 1% of children were illegitimate.  Perhaps, Mary waiting until the age of 30, and, to a widower seven years younger than she means her illegitimacy played a factor in her life.

…My guess was that John Alling had some ‘splaning to do at home.

Children of Aaron Perkins and Mary Alling, born and/or baptized at New Haven:

Aaron, b. 6 May 1725;

  1. Rachel, b. 3 Mar 1726/7;
  2. Martha, bp 20 Aug 1728, m. at Woodbridge 15 Sep 1748 Moses Brooks;
  3. (probably) Moses, bp. 11 Sep 1731; and
  4. Mary Perkins, bp. 22 Sep 1734, d. 4 Feb 1806 at Cheshire, m. at New Haven 26 Jul 1757 to Nicholas Russell.

 

Roger Alling

1612-1674

Immigrant Ancestor

First Treasurer of the Colony of New Haven

Deacon, Blacksmith, Farmer

Roger Alling

Samuel Alling

John Alling

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Roger Ailing(1) or Alling, as his name was generally spelled, or Allen, as his descendants in many cases spell it, was an immigrant ancestor.

Roger was born and baptized on 6 December 1612 in Kempston, Bedford, England. His parents were James Allen and Margaret Coppin. He died in New Haven, Connecticut Colony, on September 27, 1674.

He came from Bedfordshire, England, on a ship with Captain Lamberton. During the voyage, the ship steward died, and Roger, although a passenger, was asked to serve as ship steward. The pay for this was 5 pounds, 10 shillings.

In April 1638, five hundred Puritans who left the Massachusetts Bay Colony under the leadership of the Reverend John Davenport and the London merchant Theophilus Eaton sailed into the harbor. These settlers were hoping to establish a better theological community than the one they left in Massachusetts and sought to take advantage of the excellent port capabilities of the harbor. The Quinnipiacs, who were under attack by neighboring Pequots, sold their land to the settlers in return for protection.

By 1640, the town’s theocratic government and nine square grid plan were in place, and the town was renamed Newhaven from Quinnipiac.

Allings were the first of the Anglo-Saxon converts in England, and the Allings/Allens were among leading Christians of England as well as America.

Roger settled in 1639 in New Haven Connecticut, among the pioneers of that town. In that year he was one of the signers of the New Haven Compact. He was granted a “desirable and eligible” home lot at what is now the corner of Church and George streets in 1641 (near the present Yale University), and in that same year was admitted a member of the First Church. At that time, the men sat on one side of the church, and the women on the other, doubtless to keep minds on the sermon. In 1642 married Mary Nash in New Haven, Connecticut. She was the eldest daughter of Thomas Nash.

Roger was allotted Pew No. 5 in the meeting house in March 1646.

He was a blacksmith by trade, as well as planter or farmer and was an active business man. All through his life he was one of the prominent leaders in directing and carrying on the Civil and Religious interests of the new settlement, prominent in town affairs and holding various town offices. He was a Sergeant of the Train Band*, was called upon to appraise estates and settle disputes, was appointed as a Custom House officer, and “a Collector of the Colledge Corne”

It is said that Roger and many of his earlier descendants were of quite dark complexion, evidence of it still appearing in some branches of his offspring.

Roger’s father, James Allen (died in 1657), who remained in England left a will in which he mentioned his son Roger:

In the name of God, Amen.

I James Allen, blacksmith, of Kempston in the county of Bedford, beinge of good and perfect memory at this present (praised be God therefore) doe make this my last will and Testament in manner and forme followinge. And first of all I bequeath my Soule into the handes of Almightie God, my Creator and Redeemer. And for my bodie I Comitt it to the earth willinge that it be decently buried in a Christian- like manner and way. And as concerninge my worldlie goods which God hath bestowed upon me, I doe give them and bequeath them as followeth, ffirst I give and bequeath unto my Sonne Roger Allen nowe liveinge in Newe England the full Sume of thirtye poundes, And to his children Tenne poundes to be equally divided amongst them within sixe moneths after my decease. Item — I give and bequeath unto my daughter Joane the nowe wife of Abram Dowlittle liveinge nowe alsoe in newe England the full si;mc of Tenne poundes. And to her children Tenne poundes to be eqimll}’ divided amongst them within sixemoneths after my decease.

Item — I doe give unto my Sonne William Twelve pence, and to his daughter Elizabeth I give tenne Shillinges to be paid to her at sixteen yeares of age.

Item — I give and bequeath unto Martha Parkes my daughter ffive poundes. And to each of her sonnes, Mathew and John Twenty Shil- linges a peece to be paid (both hers and theirs) within six moneths after my decease.

Item — I give more unto Martha my daughter one Saffe Cupbord, one mattresse one paire of sheetes one greene chayer one greene stoole one barrell.

Item — I give more unto Martha my daughter one feather bedd and one feather bolster. In case my daughter Joane comes not to demand the same within twoe years. If she doth then I will both the feather bedd and feather bolster shal be hers.

Item — I give unto Richard Parkes husband unto Martha Parkes half a Crowne.

Item — I give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Warrens children, Mary Warren, Rebecca Warren and Margaret Warren and James Warren, three poundes a peece. To be paid unto them and either of them (shall they live) at the age of sixteen yeares, And to her other fower sonnes William Warren, John Warren, Thomas Warren, and Henry Warren, I give and bequeath forty shillinges a peece, those of them who shall be at my death of sixteene yeares of age, to receive the same sixe moneths after my decease. The rest to receive the same when they shall come to the age of sixteene yeares.

Item — I give and bequeath unto my sonne John Allen that messuage or Tenement house and outhouses with the Close thereunto adjoyninge scituate and lyeing in Kempston wood end. And alsoe one Close more, called by the name of Nyne Leyes, with the appurtenances thereunto beJonginge what- soever unto him, the said John Allen To have and to hold to him and to his heirs forever.

Item — All my other goods and chattclls whatsoever unbequeathed I give and bequeath unto my said sonne John Allen, whom I make my whole and sole Executor of this my last will and Testament.

Item — I nominate and appoint my two trusty and well beloved friends John Ampps of Kemp- stone and William Ridgeley of Newport Paggnell Overseers

It I of this my last will and Testament And I doe give and bequeath nnto them Twelve pence a peece. In Witness whereof I the said James Allen have hereunto sett my hand & seale the seaventh day of January in the year of our Lord God one thousand sixe hundred hftve and sixe.

James Allen, [l. s.]

Signed and sealed in the presence of Edmund Allen, Luke Pickeringe The marke of Sarah Witt.

This Will was proved at London before the Judges of probate of wills and grauntinge of Administracions lawfully authorized, the twentieth day of January m the year of our

Lord God accordinge to the computacion of the Cherch of England one thousand sixe hundred fiftye seaven, by the oath of John Allen the sonne and Executor therein named. To whom was committed administracion of all and singular the goodes, chattells and debts of the said deceased. He beinge first by Comission sworne well and truly to administer &c.”

Prerogative Court of Canterbury

Register, Wooton, Folio 36.

When his father, James Allen, died in 1657 in England, Roger returned to his home to receive his inheritance and that of his sister, Joana Doolittle, who stayed in New England.  While he was there, Roger studied up his ancestral line and found an ancient spelling of the name “Allen” to have been “Alling” and for that reason changed his name from Allen to Alling."

In 1661 or 1662 Roger appraised the estate of Thomas Jeffery, (Sgt.)

Roger was a custom house officer; Sergeant of the first military company and was elected the first and only treasurer of the colony of New Haven (1661-1663) until he became ineligible because of his ordination as deacon of the First (or Center) Church in 1669. He continued in the office of deacon as long as he lived.

 Roger died on 27 September 1674 in New Haven, Connecticut Colony. He left only a nuncupative will (delivered orally to witnesses rather than written), which his children accepted. His estate inventoried at 394 lbs 17s. His widow, Mary (Nash) Ailing, survived him about nine years.

Children were:

  1. Mary Alling  Nov. 26, 1643; d. Mar. 18, 1716. She married Joseph Moss on 11 Apr 1667
  2. Samuel Alling Nov. 4, 1645; baptized the New Haven Colony on November 4, 1645,  d. Aug. 28, 1709
  3. John Alling Oct. 2. 1647; was baptized in New Haven Colony on October 2, 1647, and died on March 25, 1717. He married Susanna Coe on 11 Jan 1671.
  4. Sarah Alling Oct. 12, 1649, was baptized in New Haven Colony on October 12, 1649, and died in 1743. She married Joseph Peck on 28 Nov 1672
  5. Elizabeth Alling was born in New Haven Colony about 1651.
  6. Susanna (AKA Susan) Alling born in New Haven Colony about 1653.
  7. James Alling (Reverend) was born in New Haven Colony on June 24, 1657, and died on March 13, 1696. He married Elizabeth Cotton on 2 Jun 1690.

* Train bands: The earliest and most important branch of the Colonial militia was an infantry company known as the train or training band. At first, all men liable for military service were formed into the town train band. They were required to have a musket, bandoleers, two pounds of powder and 120 bullets. Bands usually consisted of 64 men. Large towns had several bands. Members were fined for unexcused absences.

For some reason, the Parmelees (another family branch) often served as drummers, making them also responsible for summoning residents to events in the days before meeting halls had bells.

Genealogical sketches of Roger Alling: of New Haven, Conn., 1639, Gilbert Allen of Morristown, N.J., 1736, and Thomas Bancroft of Dedham, Mass., 1640, and some of their descendants (1883)

Author: Allen, John Kermott, b. 1858; Salter, Edwin, 1824-1888
Subject: Allen, Gilbert, 1736-1816; Alling, Roger, d. 1674; Bancroft, Thomas, 1622-1691; Allen family; Bancroft family
Publisher: Lansing, Mich. : Journal Steam Printing House
Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT
Language: English
Call number: 1113101
Digitizing sponsor: Boston Public Library
Book contributor: Boston Public Library
Collection: americana; blc

http://www.archive.org/details/genealogicalsket00alle

New England families, genealogical and memorial:

A record of the achievements of her people in the making of commonwealths and the founding of a nation, Volume 3 by William Richard C Lewis, Historical Publishing Company, 1915

 

Samuel Alling

1645-1709

Treasurer of the New Haven Colony

Blacksmith

Samuel Alling

John Alling

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

“Sergeant” Samuel Alling (Roger1) was born on 4 November 1645 in New Haven, Connecticut, the son of Roger Ailing and Mary Nash. Samuel was baptized in the First Congregational Society, New Haven, on 4 Nov 1645. Samuel married Elizabeth Winston daughter of John Winston and Elizabeth Austin in New Haven, CT. on 24 October 1667. They were married by Mr. Mathew Gilbert. After the death of his wife, Samuel married Sarah Chedsey. Samuel died on 28 August 1709 in New Haven, Connecticut. He is buried at the Center Church on the Green (Also known as: First Congregational Churchyard, Old New Haven Burying Ground), in New Haven. His tombstone is not found along the wall of the Grove Street Cemetery where his parents’ and in-laws (2nd wife) John & Elizabeth Chedsey’s tombstones are located.

Samuel signed the New Haven Colony Contract in 1639. He, like his father, and grandfather, was a blacksmith. Their home was at the corner of Church & Center Streets.
Elizabeth bore him six sons, and died soon after Daniel was born, in 1682. She was 32.  Samuel was left with an infant son and five other children. Less than a year later (October 26, 1683), he married his second wife, Sarah, daughter of Deacon John Chidsey.

Samuel was treasurer of the New Haven Colony. He was one of the proprietors in 1685.

Sgt. Samuel Alling did not have a will at his death. His widow, Sarah, was appointed executrix on the 20th Oct., 1709, and Joseph Moss & John Punderson were appraisers of his estate. His estate valued at 526 pounds 7 shillings was distributed as follows: Samuel, the eldest son, received a double portion of 96 pounds, Roger (third son) had already received his portion; John was given a right in the paternal homestead, 2 acres in the meadow at Westside, one acre in town and eight acres near his father’s farm in Allingtown; David & Caleb received land at Oyster point; and the remaining eight children received 48 pounds each. The two underage children, Caleb & Ester, chose their mother to be their guardian.

Samuel Ailing, had seven sons and three daughters who lived to maturity

Children of Samuel Ailing and Elizabeth Winston, born at New Haven:

  1. Samuel Alling, October 16, 1668, settled in Newark, New Jersey;
  2. John Alling, March 27, 1671, settled in Elizabeth, New Jersey ;
  3. James Alling
  4. Roger Alling, December 9, 1675, lived in New Haven;
  5. Theophilus Alling, February 17, 1680, lived at East Haven;
  6. Daniel Alling, 1682, settled at Orange. Connecticut.

Children by second wife Sarah:

  1. 7.Sarah Alling, b. January 17, 1685;
  2. 8.Elizabeth Alling, b. November, 1691, lived at New Haven;
  3. 9. Caleb Alling, September 7, 1694, lived at Hamden, Connecticut;
  4. 10. Esther Alling, b.January 10, 1699.

*The only history I can find of Allingtown is that it is now part of West Haven, Connecticut. There are several remnants of the Alling name in West Haven; streets, golf courses, etc.

Elizabeth Austin

1626- 1680

Immigrant Ancestress

Austin Winston” align=”left” height=”175″ hspace=”12″ width=”250″>

 

 

Elizabeth Austin

Elizabeth Winston

John Alling

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Elizabeth Austin (1) was born about 1626 in England. She married Sgt. John Winston on 5 Nov 1648 in New Haven, CT, and died 19 Oct 1680. Burial: Grove Street Cemetery New Haven, Connecticut, Plot: Buried in the New Haven Green – tombstone along the north wall of the Grove St. Cemetery.

Elizabeth joined the First Church of Christ in New Haven in October, 1689.

Interesting American events during her lifetime include:

1626 A large Codfish, split open at a Cambridge market, is found to contain a copy of a book of religious treatises by John Frith.

1647 Rice cultivation was introduced in the Carolinas.

1648 The Massachusetts Bay Colony had poor harvests.  They were saved from starvation by the huge flocks of passenger pigeons.

1659 The celebration of Christmas was banned in Boston (until 1681). The pilgrims believed it to be a decadent celebration.

Children of Elizabeth Austin and Sgt. John Winston are:

  1. 1.        Elizabeth Winston 1649 – 1682 (m. Samuel Alling )
  2. Ester Winston
  3. Grace Winston 1654 – 1695 Married? Smith
  4. John Winston 1657 – 1711
  5. Austin Winston
  6. Ester Winston
  7. Mary Winston

 

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:oacnvKXab_0J:otal.umd.edu/~walt/gen/htmfile/668.htm+alling+history+Elizabeth+Austin&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a

http://books.google.com/books?id=eOBLAAAAMAAJ&ots=q3AjXm8MK9&dq=Historical%20catalogue%20of%20the%20members%20of%20the%20First%20Church%20of%20Christ%20in%20New%20Haven%2C%20Connecticut&pg=PA17#v=onepage&q=john%20winston&f=false

 

Deborah Bachiler/ Bachelor

Abt. 1592-Bef. 1680

Immigrant Ancestress

“The Matriarch of Sandwich”

Deborah Bachiler

Daniel Wing

Daniel Wing

Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Deborah Bachiler (Stephan1) was born about 1590 almost certainly in Wherwell, Hampshire, England, the oldest child of Rev. Stephan Bachiler and his first wife. Deborah Bachiler married Rev. John Winge (or, Wynge), about 1609, probably in Holland. While some Wing family historians believe that she was the “Olde Goody Wing” who died in Yarmouth in JAN 1691/92, she was not mentioned in the delayed probate record of her son, Matthew Wing, in 1680 so was almost certainly already deceased at that date.

During the year 1629, a colonizing society “The Plough Company” was encouraging emigrants to go to New England. Reverend Bachiler invested one hundred pounds in the company (and loaned them more). He was determined to leave England for New England. It was during this year that Rev. John Wing, husband of Deborah Bachiler, wrote his will in London, and died 4 August 1630. Deborah, now a widow, made the decision to immigrate to America with her father and his wife, Helena Mason Bachiler.

 

Deborah (Bachelor) Wing occupies a unique position among the Cape Cod pioneers, because she was the head of a family. Nearly all the heads of families on Cape Cod in the seventeenth century were males. Deborah Bachelor immigrated on “Deborah Wing, xxxii years old, wife of Mr. John Wing preacher resident in Vlishing with her two children, vizt. Steephen iii years old and Deborah Wing xiii yeares old yrs. ib’m”, were granted a license “to pass beyond the sea” [Jun 22, 1624]

 

Deborah remained in Saugus (now Lynn) Mass where her father was pastor until 1637. That was the year he removed to mid-Cape Cod (Yarmouth). She removed with her sons to upper or western Cape Cod and there she became a founder of Sandwich. In Sandwich history, she is referred to as “the Matriarch”. She lived in 1638 at 8 Morse Road, Sandwich, MA, USA. She moved to at Yarmouth, MA, USA, D; Moved with son John & friend John Dillingham. She moved to at Brewster, D. She died on 13 January 1692/93 at Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA.

There was a poem written about Deborah Bachiler Wing in 1903 by Mrs. Elizabeth Hoxie Ware of Sandwich, Mass.  It was read at the dedication of a bronze tablet marking the Sandwich location where Deborah Bachiler Wing raised her sons. I include that lovely poem here:


Long years ago in England,

When England yet was young,

Where the River Test flows softly,

Twixt banks of brightest green,

And Queen Elfrida’s convent,

through the arching trees is seen.

Softly she sang her childish thoughts,

As the daises her small feet pressed;

Softly she touched the fragrant flowers,

Or watched the wild birds nest.

And this is the song the wee maid sang:

“There’s never a day without a cloud

Or a joy without a sorrow:

And the sun that sets in the rain tonight

Will shine for me tomorrow.”

The preacher prayed inside the church

For a conscience freed from sin,

While the little child in innocence

Caught the heavenly voice within–

“Father I stood by the river

just as the moon went down,

And it lighted the church of Wherewell

As if with a golden crown.

And Father, I saw a vision;

Dost thou think that children may?”

“And what was the vision daughter?

Tell it to me, pray.”

Her dark eyes grew more earnest,

While steady and strong was she;

“I saw four boys and a woman

In a vessel upon the sea.

And she was sad and lonely;

And a man that looked like thee

Stood near; and there was sound of weeping,

And the woman looked like me.”

“Didst see aught else, my daughter?”

And he thought of the threatening storm

Of church and state and conscience,

And his weary heart grew warm.

For might not his little maiden

Be chosen of God to warn

Benighted, priest ridden England

Of the rise of a brighter dawn?

Earnest and still that fair child stood,

As Deborah stood of old,

And God’s grace shone upon her

While she her vision told.

It came again unto her,

The same foreshadowing truth;

And with a tiny hand extended,

She saw through the bounds of youth.

“Father, I see the vessel,

And many are there, who make

The air resound with prayers

For God and conscience sake.”

Scarce eighteen summers now have come and gone,

With each clouds of sunshine on the way;

Life’s story glimmers bright with youthful song,

And earnest hours have changed from foolish play.

The little child unto a maiden fair has grown;

A strong souled man has looked into her eyes,

And from her heart her girlhood’s song has flown.

While in it’s place thoughts strange and sweet arise

Across her sunny pathway

With young love’s wooing came

Young John, the stalwart preacher,

With words of sweetest flame.

“Deborah, beloved maiden,

Thou art dear, and unto thee

Give I all my heart; now answer,

Givest thou thine to me?”

Deborah, the gentle maid,

With her eyes of dusky brown,

Answered softly, “John, I love thee”

With her fair face drooping down.

Think ye then that John the preacher

E’er remembered priestly gown,

With that sweet faced maid before him

With her hair of burnished brown?

Nay, for in his arms he gathered

Her love unto his heart;

“God do ill and more to me, love

If I fail to do my part.”

Came there then no thought or vision?

Forgotten was the prophesy

Of the sad-eyed lonely woman

Out upon the stormy sea.

A few more years have come and gone

While joy and sadness into life have grown.

We see the blessings of the children five,

We hear the sadness of the widow’s moan.

The vision given in the fleeting years long gone,

Seems nearing now it’s strange, sad truth to prove.

the woman on the stormy sea forlorn,

In spirit hath no confines to her love.

Ah rare indeed that company

The Lord did send out that day!

Did the little ship The Francis

Sail calmly on it’s way?

Sail, stately ship, more proudly;

Thy banners all unfurled;

Thou carry’st wondrous tidings

Unto an unknown world.

Oh, Shawme Lake, by Indians called, how fair!

We greet thee now, unknown to world and fame.

Oh Sandwich! Unto thee we give our love–

For in her longing heart she gave thee name.

 

 

 

Children of Deborah Bachelor and Rev. John Wing:

 

  1. Deborah Wing   (1611)
  2. John Wing Jr.   (1613 – 1699)
  3. Daniel Wing   (1615 – 1679)
  4. Stephan Wing   (1621 – 24 Aug 1710)
  5. Matthew Wing   (abt. 1634/35 – 1680)

 

Rev. Stephen Bachiler

Abt. 1561 – 1656

Immigrant Ancestor

Founder of Hampton, N.H

 

Stephen Bachiler

Deborah Bachiler

Daniel Wing

Daniel Wing

Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Stephen Bachiler (1) (c. 1561 – 1656) was an English clergyman who was an early proponent of the separation of church and state in America. His first wife was Deborah (Unknown).

“He must have had rare physical as well as intellectual vigor. From tradition and the characteristics of his descendants, it is probable that he was tall and sinewy, with prominent features, especially the nose; a very dark complexion; black, coarse hair in early days, white in age, mouth large and firm, eyes black as sloes; features long rather than broad; a strong clear voice; rather slow of motion and speech; simple in dress, wearing in Lynn a suit of liste which he brought from England; obstinate and tenacious of his opinions to a marked degree; a powerful preacher, drawing largely from the scripture and impressing his hearers with the uncommon power and sanctity of his sermons; strong in his friendships and his hates.

 

Winthrop classed him among “honest men” when he arrived in 1632, and Prince in his Annals of New England, Appendix to 1632, says: :’From governor Winslow and Captain Johnson, we learn that he (Stephen Bachiller) was an ancient minister in England: had been a man of Fame in his Day; was 71 years of Age when he came over: bro’t a number of people with him; and soon became the 1st Feeder of the Flock of Christ at Lynn (and by several Letters I have seen of his own Writing to the R. Mr. Cotton of Boston, I find he was a Gentleman of Learning and Ingenuity, and wrote a fine and curious hand.”

 

It is evident from what I have read and learned of Stephen Bachiller that he was not only instilled with exceptional physical and intellectual prowess but was also imbued with a great love for his children and grandchildren. A famous story of Rev. Bachiller that illustrates this fact is; “On the first Sunday at Lynn, four children were baptized. Thomas Newhall, the first white child born in Lynn, was first presented. Mr. Bachiller put him aside saying, “I will baptize my own child first.” meaning Stephen, his daughter’s child, born the same week as Thomas Newhall.”

A little band of pioneers under the leadership of Rev. Stephen Bachiler of Southhampton, England, Seeking a larger liberty, in October 1638 settled in the wilderness near this spot to plant a free church in a free town. They were joined in 1639 by others and in that year the town was incorporated. To do honor to the founder of Hampton, to exalt the ideals for which they strove and as an inspiration to posterity this memorial is dedicated, October 14, 1925.

An early graduate of Oxford (St. John’s College, 1586), he was vicar of Wherwell, Hampshire (1587-1605) when ousted for Puritanical leanings under James I. In 1630 he was a member of the Company of Husbandmen in London and with them, as the Plough Company, obtained a 1,600 mile² (4,000 km²) grant of land in Maine from the Plymouth Council for New England. The colony was called “Lygonia” after Cecily Lygon, mother of New England Council president Sir Ferdinando Gorges. Bachiler was to be its minister and leader. Although the settlers sailed to America in 1631, the project was abandoned.

Bachiler was 70 years old when he reached Boston in 1632, and gathered his followers to establish the First Church of Lynn (then Saugus). He incurred the hostility of the Puritan theocracy in Boston, casting the only dissenting vote among ministers against the expulsion of Roger Williams. Despite his age, he was uncommonly energetic, and throughout some two decades pursued settlement and church endeavors, always engaged in controversy and confrontation with Bay Colony leaders.

In 1638, Bachiler and others successfully petitioned to begin a new plantation at Winnacunnet, to which he gave the name Hampton when the town was incorporated in 1639. His ministry there became embroiled in controversy when Timothy Dalton was sent to the town as “teaching assistant” by the Boston church after New Hampshire was absorbed by Massachusetts in 1641. Shortly thereafter, Bachiler was excommunicated by the Hampton church on unfounded charges of “scandal”, but protested to Governor Winthrop and was later reinstated. In other respects, Bachiler’s reputation was such that in 1642, he was asked by Thomas Gorges, deputy governor of the Province of Maine, to act as arbitration “umpire” (deciding judge) in a Saco Court land dispute between George Cleeve and John Winter.

Rev. Stephen Bachiler’s personal
chair, now on loan at the New
Hampshire Historical Society.

By 1644 Cleeve had become deputy governor of Lygonia, a rival province to that of Gorges’ in Maine established from a resurrected Plough Patent, and asked Bachiler to be its minister at Casco. Bachiler deferred, having already received a call to be minister for the new town of Exeter. Once again Massachusetts intervened in his affairs when the General Court ordered deferral of any church at Exeter. Frustrated in his attempts at a new ministry, Bachiler left Hampton and went as missionary to Strawbery Banke (now Portsmouth, New Hampshire) probably that same year 1644. While there, he married in 1648 (as fourth wife) a young widow, Mary Beedle of Kittery, Maine. In 1651, she was indicted and sentenced for adultery with a neighbor. Denied a divorce by the Massachusetts Court, Bachiler finally returned to England about 1653.

The very fact that he was responsible for transporting not only his daughter Deborah and her sons to America, but also other members of his family (Ann Sanborn and her 3 sons) indicates that he had a great love for all of them. How painful it must have been for his children and grandchildren to watch as others tried to ruin his reputation and besmirch his name.

Eventually the Rev. Bachiller would return to England, no doubt broken-hearted over his perceived failure in America. Burned out, his books and papers destroyed his finances in tatters, his name blackened by the young Mary Beedle and leaving the family that meant so much to him must have caused tears to well in the old man’s eyes. Sometime in 1654, accompanied by one grandson (possibly more) he sailed from New England to return to his own England that now, ironically, seemed a refuge to him.

Daniel Webster, the politician and famous orator, was one of the illustrious descendants of Stephan Bachiller. Daniel Webster wrote to his son Fletcher March 5, 1840: “I believe we are all indebted to my father’s mother for a large portion of the little sense which belongs to us. Her name was Susannah Bachelder; she was the descendant of a clergyman and a woman of uncommon strength of understanding. If I had had many boys I should have called one them Bachelder.”

There is monument to Stephen Bachiller at the Center of Founders Park in Hampton, New Hampshire. What follows is the inscription on that monument:

 

He died near London, and was buried in the new churchyard of Allhallows Staining on 31 October 1656, presumably aged above 90 years, as he had matriculated at St John’s College, Oxford, on 17 November 1581, and would later give his age as 71 years upon his arrival in the Massachusetts Bay Colony aboard the William and Francis on 5 June 1632

Bachiler’s many descendants include James Dean, Winston Churchill, Daniel Webster, and Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. Perhaps the best summation of his career is in the biographical entry in Robert Charles Anderson’s The Great Migration Begins (NEHGS, Boston 1995): “Among the many remarkable lives lived by early New Englanders, Bachiler’s is the most remarkable.”

 

Children of Stephen Bachiler and Deborah:

 

  1. Nathaniel Bachiler, born about 1589. A merchant of Southampton; married Hester Mercer* of Southampton, sister of Peter, Paul and Reverend. Francis Mercer, and of Jane ( Mercer ) Pryaulx, wife of Capt. Peter Pryaulx of Southampton. Nathaniel Bachiler left children: Nathaniel (who settled in Hampton, New Hampshire) Anne Bachiler; married Daniel du Cornet of Middelburg, Holland), Stephen, Francis and Benjamin.
  2. Deborah Bachiler, born 1591. Married Reverend John Wing ( son of Matthew of Banbury, Oxon) first pastor of the Puritan Church at Flushing ; afterward minister of the Puritan Church at The Hague, Holland ;* died in 1630; ancestor of the Wings, of Cape Cod.
  3. Samuel, born about 1592. Minister in Sir Charles Morgan’s Regiment in Holland; called to be minister in Middelburg, in 1622, but declined;” author of “Miles Christianas,” published in 1625.
  4. Stephen, born about 1594. Matriculated at Magdalen
    College, Oxford, 1610.
  5. Theodate, born 1598. Married Captain and Councillor Christopher Hussey, of Hampton, New Hampshire,— perhaps a relative of Christopher Hussey, mayor of Winchester in 1609, 1618 and 1631.
  6.  Anna, born 1600. Married John Samborne, probably of the Hants family of that name; a widow in 1631 living in the Strand in London; her children settled in
    Hampton, New Hampshire.

Margery Baker

Bef. 1600-Abt.1656

Immigrant Ancestress

Margery Baker

Mary Nash

Samuel Alling

John Alling

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Margery Baker (1) was the daughter of Nicholas Baker (d. 1632) and Mary Hodgetts of Bewdley, Worcestershire, England. She is the granddaughter of John Baker and Margery Madestard. She married Thomas Nash in England. Margery Baker died about 1656.

Mary immigrated to America with her husband, Thomas, and five children after spending some time in Holland. New Haven Records: “Old Sister Nash” asigned to sit in the 2d seat the women’s section in the little crosse seats in the meeting house.”

Mary died before her husband and was probably buried in the New Haven Green where he was buried.

17th Century Recipe: To sowce Oysters.

Take out the meat of the greatest Oysters: save the liquor that commeth from them, and streme it into an earthen Pipkin: put into it halfe a pinte of white Wine, and halfe a pinte of white Wine vinegar: put in some whole Pepper, and sliced Ginger. Boyle all these together with two or three Cloaves, when it hath boyled a little, put in your Oysters, and let them boyle teo or three walmes, but not too much. Then take them up, and let the sirrup stand untill it be cold: then put in your Oysters, and so you may keepe them all the yeere.

The children of Thomas Nash and Margery Baker are:

1.        John Nash was born about 1615, and died in New Haven, Connecticut Colony, on July 3, 1687. He married Elizabeth Tapp, daughter of Edmund Tapp; she died on May 1, 1676, in New Haven. They had four children: Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, and Hannah. Per Early New England Settlers, which contains much additional information, his New Haven tombstone reads: HERE Lyeth THE BODY / OF THE HONOVRED & / WORTHY MAOr JOHN / NASH AGED 72 DE / CEASED JULYYe3 / 1687
2.        Timothy Nash was baptized in Bewdley, Worcestershire, England, on February 15, 1617/8, and died in Bewdley on July 21, 1618. Since Joseph and Timothy were baptized together, they probably were twins. He lived only about four months
3.        Joseph Nash was baptized in Bewdley on February 15, 1617/8, and died in Bewdley. Since Joseph and Timothy were baptized together, they probably were twins. There is no death record for Joseph as there is for the first Timothy, but since his parents named a later son Joseph, he probably died young
4.        Mary Nash was born in Kempston, Bedford, England, about 1621, and died in New Haven on August 16, 1683 m. Roger Allen or Ailing
5.        Sarah Nash: She married Robert Talmadge. They had six children: Abigail, Thomas, Sarah, John, Enos, and Mary.
6.        Timothy Nash was born in Bewdley about 1626, and died in Hadley, Massachusetts, on March 13, 1699. He married Rebecca Stone, daughter of Samuel Stone; she died in March or April of 1709. They had two children: Rebecca and Samuel.
7.        Joseph Nash was baptized in Bewdley on July 1, 1627, and died in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1678. He married twice, Mary and Margaret, and had three children: John, Hannah, and Sarah. (Sergeant Joseph Nash of Hartford.)
8.        Samuel Nash was born in Bewdley on March 29, 1630. Samuel does not appear in written sources given at the end of this page, but was found by Dorothy Roberts in the parish register of St. Leonard's Church, Ribbesford Parish, Bewdley, and Worcestershire, England. The entries for Joseph and Timothy were on the same LDS microfilm, but not John, Mary, and Sarah

Schenck's Hist, of Fairfield gives her date of death as 1660, page 397

The Beardsley Line

Anciently written Bardsey, Bardesy, Bardesley, Berdsley, etc., this family name is of frequent occurrence in early times in England. There have been some plausible speculations as to its origin, but the most interesting traces it to the Isle of Bardsey, in Cardigan Bay, off the coast of Wales, and in that connection assumes as the ancestor one Robert de Bardesolo, or Robert of Bard’s Isle, said to have been a descendant of Ive de Tailbor, a chieftain in the army of William the Conqueror. This, however, is conjecture pure and simple, and the whole matter of the Beardsley family origin in the old country remains to be established by more definite research which thus far has been unavailing.

Spelling in those early times was not reduced to a science. It was largely phonetic; hence one or more different letters were used in a given word in the same document and by the same penman. 

In the old Probate records in Connecticut the name is spelled quite differently in the same paper; for instance, Beardsley, Beardslee, Bardsly', Bersley, etc. 

The records of the ship "Planter," in which the first of the name came to this country, so far as we have any record, have the names of the parents spelled "Beardsley" and of the children "Beardslie," which is the French way of spelling "ley " Mary, the mother's name, was spelled Marie, which meant Mary. Harvy was spelled Harvie in the same record.

A letter from Frank Beardsley, Solicitor, Ilkeston, tells of his interest in Beardsley lore, and portions of it reads, as follows “The Beardsley family, by tradition, was in Ilkeston before William the Conqueror’s time, 1066. Unfortunately, I do not think there are any written records of those early times, for the simple reason practically everything belonged to the Lord of the Manor, and it was difficult in England to even move to the next parish, because if you did, you had to satisfy the new Parish Authorities that you would not eventually have to be assisted financially out of their parish funds, because in law each parish was responsible for their poor and in the majority of parishes, the people were as a rule, only just able to exist as they were mostly ordinary workers for the Lord of the Manor.

Edwin Salter, of Washington, D. C, from whom important quotations have already been made, writes: 

"You have in the Beardsley family many honorable names, and as a family it is above the average in ability and respectability."

Twelve of the family had graduated at 'Yale' prior to 1845.''

In America the founder of the family was William Beardsley (the name being so written on the passenger list of the ship in which he came), and who arrived in Massachusetts in 1635, and soon afterwards removed to Connecticut, where he was one of the very first permanent settlers. From him many families of the name Beardsley, and some who prefer the form Beardslee, have sprung. These families have spread throughout the country, and have produced numerous men of attainments and distinction in professional and public life, and of noteworthy enterprise and achievement in the varied pursuits of commerce and industry. The line here traced has been of uninterrupted Connecticut residence since the year 1637, and from the founder to the youngest descendant comprehends eleven generations.

In the year, 1939, the 300th anniversary of the settlement of Stratford, Connecticut, the descendants of William and Mary Beardsley, placed a memorial for these ancestors; a bronze plaque, which reads as follows “To honor the memory of William and Mary Beardsley and the other first settlers of Stratford who landed near this spot in the year, 1639”. It was erected by the Beardsley Family Association. This plaque is on a boulder, placed in Sandy Hollow, near the spot where the first settlers landed. The boulder came from a Beardsley homestead, located near enough to Sandy-Hollow, to make one visualize that undoubtedly the children of William and Mary Beardsley, played upon this rock. William and Mary Beardsley were undoubtedly, practical, thrifty people, coming to America in search of a new home, in what they hoped would be a land of opportunity.

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/topic/newengland/savage/bk1/144-155.htm The Beardsley family is listed as one of the early settlers in the book “A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, before 1692.

 Joseph Beardsley

1634-1712

Immigrant Ancestor

Loved the Sea

Joseph Beardsley

Thomas Beardsley

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Joseph Beardsley (William1) was born 16 Nov 1634 in England, the son of William Beardsley and Mary Harvey. He was christened November 16, 1634, St Mary’s Church, Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England.  He came to America when he was an infant. He married Phoebe Dayton in 1665 in Brookhaven, Long Island, New York, and died 29 May 1712 in Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut. Burial: Union Cemetery, Stratford, Fairfield, Ct.

 

The Voyage:

Joseph sailed on Planter of London, Nicholas Trerice, Master. The ship sailed from London about April 10, 1635 and arrived at Boston on Sunday, June 7, 1635.
The following were among the passengers certified from St. Alban, Hertfordshire:
William Beardsley 30
Mrs. Mary Beardsley 26 Concord and Stratford, Ct.
Mary Beardsley 04
John Beardsley 02
Joseph Beardsley 1/2

The family returned to Stratford from Long Island, and “Joseph Beardsley, Sr. ” was admitted to the Stratford Church.

In the “List of Inhabitants of Stratford, 1668”, we find the name, Joseph Beardslye; and again, his name appears in 1671, on the tax list for the “White Hills Purchase”. His estate inventoried at L 782-07-00. Source: Nellie Beardsley Holt author of Beardsley Genealogy.

Very few records about him have been found. He carried out his father’s wishes, by “marrying and leaving the sea”, thus claiming his inheritance. By this, I would suppose he was a sailor in his younger days. In the “List of Inhabitants of Stratford, 1668,” we find the name, Joseph Beardslye; and again, his name appears, 1671, on the tax list for the “White Hills Purchase.” His estate inventoried, L782-07-00. Source: Nellie Beardsley Holt author of Beardsley Genealogy, page 7
Children of Joseph Beardsley and Phoebe Dayton are:

 

  1. Joseph Beardsley, born 10 June 1666 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 1745 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT
  2. Jonathan Curtis Beardsley, born 01 November 1668; died in Connecticut.
  3. Hannah Beardsley, born 30 April 1670 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died in Connecticut; married Thomas Harvey
  4. Elizabeth Beardsley, born 1672 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died Abt. 1772 in Ridgefield, CT; married (1) Edmund Prilford; married (2) Abraham Pullin.
  5. Thomas Beardsley, born May 1674 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 28 September 1773 in Huntington, CT; married Sarah Dimic.
  6. Ephraim Beardsley, born 1677 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 1733 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT.
  7. John Beardsley, born 1681; died 29 November 1735 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT.
  8. Josiah Beardsley, born 1681 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 1769 in Connecticut.

 

 

 

Mary Beardsley

1712-aft. 1747

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Beardsley (Thomas3,Joseph2,William1) was born in1712 in Stratford, CT. She was the daughter of Thomas Beardsley and Sarah Dimic. She married Peter Mallory in 1730 in Connecticut. Mary died in Trumbull, CT.

 

During the time Mary lived, clothes were uncomfortable to wear.  Unless they were very wealthy, women had two sets of clothes, one set for weekdays and one set for Sunday. They wore a corset around their waist, laced as tight as they could get it. It was not unheard of for ribs to be broken. They wore wears clogs over shoes so as not to get them muddy. A pocket-hoop farthingale made ladies waists look thin and her stomach look flat. Both men and women wore wigs. Wigs were a very important part of clothing, and came in many styles. Some of the wigs cost as much as a house.

The styles of the times dictated that elbows and knees be covered at all times. Standards of cleanliness were very different from today as germs had not been discovered yet and the links between dirt, infection and disease had not been made. This meant that clothing was not washed often and some items that did not touch the skin, such as a gown, might never be washed.

It was both practical and stylish for a woman to wear a cap. It covered dirty, possibly lice-infested hair and kept it away from the fire. A woman would wear a cap both indoors and out. When outside, she might put on another hat over her cap. A “frontage” was one of several styles popular in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

Clothes were made from wool or leather for rustic county men. First, a woman had to sheer the sheep, using sheep shears, which are like scissors to cut off the wool. Then she had to scour the wool, which is cleaning it. Then she had to card the wool. Carding is to fluff the wool. To card it, she took a small amount of wool and put it between a paddle which has many small hooks on it then pull one paddle across the other paddle. After this is done it is spun on the spinning wheel. After it was spun, she likely took it to a weaver to make cloth.  No wonder they did not have a lot of clothing! That which they had lasted them for decades, and was often handed down from one generation to the next.

Children of Peter Mallory and Mary Beardsley are:

 

  1. Peter Mallory, born in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT; died 1769 in Hamden, New Haven Co., CT.
  2. Mary Mallory, born Abt. 1732 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT; died 19 April    1762 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.
  3. Charity Mallory, born Abt. 1734 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., CT; died 1826 in Salem Parish; married Jesse Hotchkiss 02 October 1759 in Waterbury,CT.
  4. Jonah Mallory, born Abt. 1734.
  5. Samuel Mallory, born Abt. 1736.
  6. Elisha Mallory, born February 1735/36 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT; died 23 March 1812 in Winchester, Litchfield, CT.
  7. Urane Mallory, born Abt. 1738.
  8. Jonah Mallory, born Abt. 1739 in Trumbull, CT; died in Waterbury, CT; married Hannah Smith Abt. 1764 in Westfield, Hampden Co., MA.
  9. Samuel Mallory, born Abt. 1741 in Trumbull, CT.
  10. Andrew Mallory, b. 13 Apr 1743, Stratford, Fairfield Co., Conn
  11. Eliakim Mallory, b. Abt 1748

 

It is not certain that she is the mother of all the children. (Families of Ancient New Haven p1122).

 

 

 

 

Thomas Beardsley

1674-1773

Farmer

 

Thomas Beardsley

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Thomas Beardsley(Joseph1) was born May 1674 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; He was the son of Joseph Beardsley and Phoebe Dayton. He married Sarah Dimic.  Thomas died 28 September 1773 in Huntington, CT.

 

His will dated 29 March 1769; approved 1773, willed to his wife Sarah all household goods, two cows, the use of the homestead, lands, dwelling house, and half of the barns during her natural life; also, willed that his son Israel should supply her annually during her natural life, with two hundred pounds of good pork, and one hundred weight of good beef and twelve bushels of good wheat, four bushels of Indian corn and twenty-five loads of good firewood; to his grandson Jared, he willed all his homestead, both in lands and buildings, a piece of Marsh meadow or ledge lying at Guilford Long Beach, equal half of a certain piece of Sat Meadow at Stratford Creat neck, five acres of land of Fool’s Hatch Hill, five acres at place called Turkey’s Pole’s, one pair of oxen, cow, and a grezlod colored horse. His will also mentioned, daughter Hannah Lane, son Israel, grandchildren Elisha and Thomas Beardsley, Elijah and Samuel Mallory, Elias and Sarah Baldwin, Rachel Wooster and Sarah Sealy.
Children of Thomas Beardsley and Sarah Dimic are:

 

  1. Israel Beardsle born 03 December 1708 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 1791 in Newton, CT
  2. Sarah Beardsley, born 24 March 1708/09; married Icabod Lewis.
  3. Mary Beardsley, born 1712 in Stratford, CT; died in Trumbull, CT; married Peter Mallory 1730 in Connecticut.
  4. Hannah Beardsley, born 28 May 1715; died 23 February 1784 in Redding, CT; married Jacob Lane 02 August 1733 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; born 1712; died 1762
  5. Elizabeth Beardsley, born 26 October 1716; married George McEwen
  6. Esther Beardsley, born Abt. 1718; married Benjamin Deforest.
  7. Henry Beardsley, born 19 May 1720
  8. Thomas Beardsley, born 19 May 1720.
  9. Thankful Beardsley, born 08 July 1729; died 08 June 1787 in Huntington, CT.

 

Source: Nellie Beardsley Holt author “Beardsley Genealogy”.

 

William Beardsley

1605-1661

Immigrant Ancestor

Named Stanford Connecticut

Mason

 

William Beardsley

Joseph Beardsley

Thomas Beardsley

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

The window above  is “In Memory to William Beardsley”—Located East Galway Methodist-Episcopal Church 2056 East Street Galway, NY 12074. It is mentioned as a memorial to him in Find a Grave; why it would be in New York is unknown.

 

William(1) was born Mar. 9, 1603 in St. Albans, Herefordshire, England, the son of William Beardsley and Margaret Hassall. He married Mary/Marie Harvey/Harvie and died July 6, 1661 in Stratford CT. Burial: Union Cemetery Stratford Fairfield County Connecticut.

 

Family lore has William’s home town being Stratford-on Avon. However, most careful and persistent searching in Stratford-on-Avon, (per Isaac Haight Beardlsey) the “traditional home” of William, failed to reveal one particle of evidence that a Beardsley had ever resided in that town. The old church records were thoroughly examined, and the graveyard was also most carefully searched with no better results. 

Isaac had hoped the "tradition" to that effect might be substantiated by some record of his birth, his marriage, or the baptism of his children; but nothing of the kind could be found.

The probabilities are that William Beardsley’s last residence, or that of his ancestors, was St. Alban’s, Hertfordshire, for he took “A certificate from the minister there and attestations from the Justice of the Peace to London, according to the Lord’s order.” They were members of the church of the Reverend Adam Blackman. Together with his congregation they emigrated on the good ship Planter, “Captain Travice commanding “2 April 1635.

There were thirty-seven emigrants in all. Nineteen were over 21 years of age and eighteen under 21. Two were 20 and one 6 months. The name, age and occupation of each were given. There were  six Tuttells, three Lawrences, one Antrobus, age 65, one Green, one Weast, one Heford, one Chittwood, four Olneys, one Giddins, one Savage, two Harris, one Peabody, three Wilcoxsons, five Beardsleys, one Perley, one Felloe, one Baker, one Carter, one Williamson, and one Morrison. 

Their occupations were quite varied. There was one "mercer,'' three "shoemakers,'' three "tailors,"' three "husbandmen," one "weaver," and one "mason." (William Beardsley)

 

These emigrants landed in Massachusetts, probably, about the first of June, or later in the summer of 1635. 

William Beardsley took the oath Dec. 7, 1636, and was admitted a freeman of Massachusetts 1638; hence he must have been a landholder. (Winthrop's History of New England.) Where did he then reside? It is highly probable he was then living in Watertown, eight miles west of Boston. It is known that several of his ship associates resided at this place. Dr. Trumbull says: "In 1635 the Watertown people gradually removed and prosecuted their settlement at Wethersfield, Conn." A few had gone there the year previous, and that year some of them located at Hartford. 

Of the early settlers of Stratford, five families were from Concord, Mass. Two of these, the Wilcoxsons and Harrises, were with William Beardsley on the good ship "Planter," and were made freemen of Massachusetts at the same time. 

It is reasonable to suppose that, when these colonists reached the Connecticut River (the Indian name of this stream was Quoncktacut, "River of Pines”) at Hartford and Wethersfield, they met William, when he joined them and proceeded with them to found a new town where they could better their financial condition. 

Another reason for this conviction is, Mary, William's eldest daughter, married Thomas Welles, in Hartford, May, 1651, and was a resident of Wethersfield for nine years. Their acquaintance may have begun previous to 1639, when her parents resided in one of the towns named; for Hugh Welles, his father, was a resident of that locality. 

William Beardsley and seventeen others left Hartford and Wethersfield (only six miles apart) in a body (probably by boat), and settled on a piece of cleared land on Long Island Sound, October 3, 1639. This place the General Court in Hartford, Oct. 10, 1639called Pequonnock Plantation.  In June,, 1640, the same court called it "Citpheay" (the Indian name), and later "Stratford,'' by which name that locality has been known to this day. 

It is thought to be indisputable that William Beardsley named the town of Stratford, Conn, but why he picked that name is unknown. 

The Colonial Records say that William Beardsley was elected to the court sessions in 1615, May, 1650, September, 1650, October 1651, May, 1652, October, 1653, February. 1656. and May, 1658. He served eight terms in thirteen years, showing that he was a man of some worth and influence. 

In the old colonial documents he is often spoken of as the "Goodman Beardsley.'' 

In 1649 the Court made the following appointment by vote: "Mr. Ludlow was desired to take care for preparing the soulgers with provisions and all necessarres for the designe in the two (sea-side) Towns; and Mr. Hull and William Beardsley are chosen to assist therein. 

Then again, at the October session, 1651: "Andrew Warde, George Hull and William Beardsley are propounded for Assistants to join with the Magistrates for the execution of justice in the Towns by the sea-side.'' This meant Stratford and Fairfield. From all this it is evident that he filled an important place in the early history of New England. 

William was active in the affairs of the settlement and served as Deputy to the General Court at Hartford from 1645 to 1659. He was one of the founders of the First Congregational Church of Stratford, and was a leading- spirit in all public affairs of those early times, as all the records clearly show. 

He died in Stratford in1661, at the early age of 56. His will is dated September 28, 1660, and probated July 6, 1661, and reads as follows: 

"I, William Beardsley, of Stratford, being sick and weak, but well in mind, do leave this my last Will and Testament. All my daughters that are now married, I give Ten pounds a peace. "M"y Sonne, Samuell, I give that red cow which I have now lent him. "T onl}' reserve tour akers of that land at Piquanock for my wife to improve, if Joseph fall in to help her, if she please; the rest is Samuel's. I also give him one of j'e new white blanketts. 

"If Joseph, my sone, please to be an assistant to my wife, for the car'ing- on of her b3'snes whilst she lives, or marries and leaves the sea, I give to him 3-e halfe of my acomodations in Stratford; if not, 1 give him twentypounds of my share of y^ bark, to add to his part. 

"I desire mj' loving wife, that if she please to ad to ye portion of anj' of my daughters, that she would ad to j^em all alike. 

"The rest of my effects 1 leave to be disposed unto my wife and children, at the discretion of Mr. Blackman, Philip Grove, John Brinsmoyd, John Burdsey' and Joseph Hawly. 

"As also ycare, government and disposal of my children. 

"It is my will that Daniell, after the decease of my wife, that he have ye other halfe of y& lots. 

"I give to my sonne, John, tenn shillings. 

"September 28, 1660.”William Beardsley." 

Presence of 
Caleb Nichols, 
John Wells. 

"This is a true copy of ye will of William Beardsley. 

"Per me, Joseph Hawly." 

The inventory of his estate was taken July 6, 1661, by Samuel Sherman, John Hurd, Henry H.Waklin, Townsman, and amounted to £327 15s. 8d.  

No record of Marie's death was found but she was still listed as an inhabitant in 1668.  

Children of Mary Harvey and William Beardsley are:

1.  1.Mary Beardsley   Born: 1631 at: Stratford-on-Avon, (Warwickshire), England  Married: May 1651    Died: 20 Sep 1691 Hadley, Hamps., Mass Spouses: Thomas Welles, Samuel Belden  
2.  Joseph Beardlsey Born: ABT 1634at: England Died: 29 May 1712 at: Stratford, Tolland, Ct  
3.  Rebecca Beardsley, Born ABT 1638 
4.  Sarah Beardsley, Born:ABT 1639 at: Stratford, Frfld, Conn Died: BEF 1692         
5.  Sarah Beardsley, Born:1640 at: Stratford, Fairfield, Ct  
6.  Samuel Beardsley, Born: ABT 1640 at: Stratford, Fairfield, Ct  Died: 24 Dec 1706 at: Stratford, Fairfield, Ct  
7.        Hannah Beardsley, Born: 1642 at: Hatfield, Hampshire, Ma  Married: Nathaniel Dickinson  Died: 23 Feb 1679 at Hatfield, Hampshire, Ma  
8.        Daniel Beardsley b. 1644 at: Stratford, Frfld, Conn  
9.  10. Thomas Beardsley   Born: 1646 at: Stratford, Frfld, Conn  
10. Ruth Beardsley Born: ABT 1648 at: , Stratford, Fairfield, Ct  
11. Rebecca Beardsley Born: ABT 1649at: Stratford, Fairfield, Ct  Died: 17 Feb 1739      at: Woodbury, Conn.  
12. Rebecca Beardsley Born: ABT 1650 at, Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut  

Source: Genealogy.com library; New England Families Genealogical and Memorial: Volume IV , pages, 1726, 2075\\
. Hatton's List of Emigrants to America 1600-1700. 

Jane Beverly

Jane Beverly

Benjamin Shephard

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Jane Beverly married Benjamin Shepard Nov. 20, 1754 in Kensington, New Hampshire. Nothing has been found thus far on her family.

18th Century Recipe: Brawn

2 pork trotters
1.5 kg shin
5 ml (1 teaspoon) pepper
4 cloves
4 whole pimentos
12.5 (1 tablespoon) salt
62.5 ml (quarter cup) vinegar
1 bay leaf



Singe and scrape off all the hair and bristles. Make a slit from between the trotters as far as the first joint. Remove gland from between trotters. Saw bones into smaller pieces. Cover the trotters with water, add all other ingredients and simmer until the meat comes away from the bones (approx 5 hours or 1.5 hours in a pressure cooker) and a small quantity of water is left. Remove the bones and cut meat into small pieces. Pour into wetted moulds and allow to set. Serve slices of cold brawn with salad such a slaphakskeentjies (cooked onion salad) or tomato salad.

 

Children of Jane Beverly and Benjamin Shepard are:

  1. Benjamin Shepard b: ABT OCT 1767 in New Hampshire

Mary Blackwell

Abt 1609-Abt 1662

Immigrant Ancestress

Mother of Ten

Mary Blackwell

Samuel Brockett

John Brockett

Anna Brockett

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Blackwell (1) was born abt 1610 in Hertford, England. Her father was Richard Blackwell, mother Elizabeth (maiden name unknown).On 14 Aug 1635 when she was about 25, she married John Brockett in St. Michaels, Hertfordshire, England. She died about1662 in Windsor, Hartford, Conn. at the age of 58.
Marriage License between John Brockett and Mary Blackwell:

John Brockett of the parish of St. Michaels in the county of Hertfordshire, gentleman, and John Mott of the town of St. AIbans in the said county, glover, are bound firmly to the obligation of one hundred pounds to the venerable Professor, Thomas Westfield, Archdeacon of St. Albans in the diocese of London, as witnessed by their seals and signatures to observe the conditions as set out below this 14th. day of August in the eleventh year of the reign of Charles, King, thank God, of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith1635.
The condicon of this obligacon is such that whereas the above bounden John Brockett of St. Michaels Batchelor And one Mary Blackwell of the same maiden daughter of Elizabeth Blackwell the late relicte and widdowe of Richard Blackwell late of Bushey deceased. are licensed to be married together If therefore there shall not hereafter appeare any lawfull lett or impediment by reason of any precontracte, consanguinity or Affinity or any other lawfull meanes whatsoever but that the said parties may be lawfully married together And that there be noe suite or demand moved or dependinge before any Judge Ecc[lesias]ticall or Civill for or concerninge any such lawfull hindrance And that the said parties doe not proceed to the solemnizacon of the said marriage without the goodwill or consent of theire parents or governors whoe are hereby licensed to marry And that the said marriage be openly solemnized in the parish Church of Sandridge And that betweene the howers of eight & twelve of the clocke in the forenoone that then this present obligacon to be void or ells to stand in full force and vertue.

Held at Herts. Record Office. The first paragraph is in Latin and the translation is not always literal. It was checked with the HRO Archivist in August 1998, in particular the abbreviation of the word "gentleman". The second paragraph is in English and has been transcribed literally.

 

For early colonists pumpkin was often the difference between survival and starvation. It was fit only for peasants, said Europe. But the Colonists soon overcame this prejudice and pumpkin soon became an almost daily staple.

 

Steamed Pumpkin Pudding

 

6 tablespoon butter
3/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
11/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3/4 cup mashed cooked pumpkin (or canned pumpkin)
1/2 cup buttermilk

 

Cream butter and sugar together until light. Beat in eggs. Stir together flour, salt, soda cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg. Mix pumpkin and buttermilk; add to creamed mixture alternately with dry ingredients, mixing well after each addition. Spoon into greased and floured 6 1/2 cup ring mold. Cover tightly with foil. Bake 350 for one hour. Let stand 10 minutes. Unmold. Serve with whipped cream. Serves 12 to 16.

 

Children of John Brockett and Mary Blackwell are:

 

  1. John Brockett, b. 1642; m. Elizabeth Doolittle. Became a doctor. Died in Oct 1720
  2. Be Fruitful Brockett was born 23 Feb 1645 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut died in 1645
  3. Benjamin Brockett 23 Feb 1645, died 1645 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.
  4. Mary Brockett, b. Sept. 25, 1646; m. Ephraim Pennington died in 1694
  5. Silence Brockett, b. Jan. 4, 1648, m. Joseph Bradley at Milford, Ct.d.25 Oct 1667
  6. Benjamin Brockett, b. Dec. 1648, m. Elizabeth Barnes. D.May 1679
  7. Abigail Brockett, b. March 10, 1650; m. John Payne, Jan. 22, 1673; d. July 4, 1729
  8. Samuel Brockett, b. Jan. 14, 1652; m. Sarah Bradley d.Oct 1742
  9. Jabez Brockett, b. 1654; d. 1654.
  10. Jabez Brockett, b. Oct. 24, 1656; m. Dorothy Lyman died on 6 Nov 1769

 

The Bradleys of New England

The first Bradleys in the United States are said to have come from the market town of Bingley, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, about twelve miles northeast of Leeds on the river Aire. The town of Bradley (or Broadlea) was about seven miles to the north of Bingley. The name Bradley is Anglo-Saxon, meaning a broad field or pasture. The father of the American pioneer of the family is not known, nor is the name of his first wife.

Their son, William Bradley, according to tradition handed down in different branches of the family, was a friend of Cromwell, and the “History of Bingley, England,” states that he was a major in the parliamentary army, and removed to New Haven, United States of America. He was the first of the family to come to Connecticut and sojourned for a time in Branford and Guilford, later removing to New Haven, where he took the oath of fidelity in August, 1644. He later lived in North Haven and had large landed interests there. He located on the west side of East (Quinnipiac) river, about nine miles north of New Haven, and soon gained possession of the cotters one hundred and eighty-nine acres in addition to his other lands. Thorpe’s “History of North Haven” states that he was the first landowner in the village.

His stepmother, Elizabeth Bradley, with her four sons and one daughter, is said to have followed him to America in 1648. These children were: Daniel; Joshua, of New Haven; Ellen, married John Allin: Nathan, born 1638; Stephen, born 1642. She married (second) in this country. John Parmalee*, who died November 8, 1659: married (third). May 27, 1663 John Evarts, who died May 10, 1669. She died in January. 1683. Both her American husbands were of Guilford.

From A Compilation of Descendents of Roger Prichard: The Bradley family was from West Riding, Yorkshire, England, and were staunch Cromwell men. Sir William’s title and the right to bear arms were conferred by Henry VIII. [Since Henry VIII died in 1547 and Sir William was born in 1597, this conferrence must have been to his father or grandfather.] He was an officer in the Parliamentary Army. After his wife died, Sir William entrusted his eldest son, William, to Theophilus Eaton, William Davenport, and a small band of dedicated men to sailed to the New World in 1638 to found a new colony [New Haven].

Children of mentioned in his will: Joseph, Abraham, Benjamin, Nathaniel, Martha, Mary, Esther.

*The same John Parmelee who was the Parmelee line ancestor through his wife, Anne Howell.

Martha Bradley

1648-1692/93

Mother of Ten Children

Martha Bradley

John Munson

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Martha Bradley (William1) was born and baptized on Oct 1648 in New Haven, Connecticut. She was the third child of William Bradley and Alice Prichard. Her sister is also an ancestress of the family. Martha married three times, first to Samuel Munson, whom she married 26 Oct 1665 in New Haven, Connecticut. After his death, , Martha married Eliaseph Preston, born 1643, died 1707. Preston was schoolmaster, town-clerk, and deacon in Wallilngford. Eliaseph’s daughter, Mary, was the second wife of Martha’s oldest son, Samuel (Thomas’ grandson). She died on 7 Jan 1707 in New Haven, Connecticut. After his death she married Matthew Sherman, and is supposed to have resided in New Haven, for when John, son of Samuel, sold to his brother Theopolus, the ancestral dwelling house on Grove Street, the site was bounded “South and West by Land in the occupation of my honored mother, Mrs. Matthew Sherman”.

The year Martha married Samuel, the Connecticut Colonies united. Elsewhere in the world during that era, there was a famine in India, which had not a drop of rain for two years; the Turks declared War on Holy Roman Empire; Louis XIV began to build palace of Versailles; The Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London, opened; Molière: “Le Tartuffe”; French horn becomes an orchestral instrument; Antonio Stradivari labeled his first violin; Milton wrote “Paradise Lost” ; Isaac Newton experimented on gravitation, invented differential calculus and constructed the reflecting telescope; The Great Plague of London began, eventually killing 68,596; First cheddar cheese was made; and the Great Fire of London occurred.

Martha’s younger sister, Sarah Bradley is also an ancestress. Sarah married Samuel Brockett.

The children of Martha Bradley and Samuel Munson are:

1.        Martha Munson, AKA Borne Martha Munson, b.6 MAY 1667 at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT d.24 APR 1728      at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT  m. Thomas ELCOCK  
2.        Samuel Munson, b. 28 FEB 1668/1669 at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT d.23 NOV 1741 at: Wallingford, New Haven Co.,CT 
3.        Thomas Munson, b.12 MAR 1670/1671 at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT d.28 SEP 1746 m. Mary Wilcoxson  15 SEP 1694      
4.        John Munson,  b. 28 JAN 1672/1673 at: New Haven, New Haven Co., CT m. Sarah Cooper.
5.        Theophilus Munson,b. 1 SEP 1675  at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT d.28 NOV 1747 at: New Haven,CT m. Esther MIX  
6.        Joseph Munson, b. 1 NOV 1677 at: Wallingford, New Haven Co.,CT  d. 30 OCT 1725      at: Wallingford, New Haven Co.,CT 
7.        Stephen Munson, b. 5 DEC 1679      at: Wallingford, New Haven Co.,CT  
8.        Caleb Munson, b. 19 NOV 1682  at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT d.23 AUG 
9.        Joshua Munson, b. 7 FEB 1684/1685 at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT d. 9 DEC 1711 at: Wallingford, New Haven Co.,CT 
10.     Israel Munson. B. 6 MAR 1686/1687 at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT d. BEF 18 JUN 1697  at: New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT

 

Sarah Bradley

1665-1742

Mother of Seven

 

 

Sarah Bradley

John Brockett

Anna Brockett

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Sarah Bradley (William1) was born on 21 June 1665 in New Haven, Ct, the ninth child of William Bradley and Alice Prichard.  She was christened on 25 June 1665 in New Haven. Her sister is also an ancestress of the family.  Sarah Bradley and Samuel Brockett were married on 21 May 1682 in Wallingford, CT. when Sarah was 16.  Sarah’s Sarah died on 26 October 1742 in New Haven, Connecticut at the age of 77.

 

From Native Americans, Colonists learned to plant squash to counteract the debilitating effect of growing corn year after year in the same field. The words pumpkin and squash were used interchangeably. Although winter squash are the ones we hear about, summer squash were also popular and provided a welcomed addition to their diet. Unlike the winter variety summer squash could not be stored for long periods but its yield was so abundant it was also used as feed for cattle and other livestock.

 

Baked Glazed Squash

2 1/2 pounds of butternut squash
1/3 cup of brown sugar
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon paprika

Slice squash in 1 inch thick slices; remove seeds. Arrange squash rings in a 13x9x2 inch baking pan. Cover with foil. Bake at 350 until almost tender, 45 to 60 minutes. Meanwhile, in saucepan combine brown sugar, butter, paprika, 1/2 teaspoon salt and dash of pepper; cook until bubbly. Spoon over squash. Continue cooking uncovered until squash until squash is tender, about 15 minutes more. Spooning mixture over squash occasionally. Serves 8.

 

Sister Martha Bradley was also an ancestress. Martha married John Munson.

 

The children of Sarah Bradley and Samuel Brockett were:

 

  1. Samuel Brockett b.15 Feb 1682-
  2. Daniel Brockett b. 30 Sep 1684
  3. Joseph Brockett b. 28 Oct 1688;
  4. Josiah Brockett b. 15 Jul 1691;
  5. Alice Brockett b. 23 Apr 1693-d.13 Nov 1719
  6. Benjamin Brockett  b. 28 May 1697
  7. John Brockett b. 8 Nov 1685, d. 12 Jan 1753 in Wallingford, m. 1 Mar 1711 Huldah Earl (d. 29 Mar 1757 in Wallingford)

Major William Bradley

1619-1691

Immigrant Ancestor

                                             First Settler in North Haven, Connecticut

                                         Twice an Ancestor

     

William Bradley                           William Bradley

Martha Bradley                             Sarah Bradley

John Munson                                 John Brockett

Elizabeth Munson                         Anna Brockett

Nicholas Russell                           Jesse Hotchkiss

Riverus Russell ——————àCharity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.          Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell                             Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee                          Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh                      Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

 

The lobster-tailed pot, breastplate, buff coat and gauntlets worn by Cromwell’s Ironsides.

They were armed with a mortuary sword and two flintlock pistols

 

 

William Bradley (1) was born on 4 September 1619 in Bingley, Yorkshire, England. He was christened on 8 July 1621 in Shipley, Bradford, England. His parents were Daniel Bradley and Joanna Waddington. He married Alice Prichard, daughter of Roger Prichard, of Springfield, Massachusetts, and Milford, Connecticut, February 18, 1645 in Springfield. William died on 29 May 1691 in New Haven, Connecticut at the age of 72. He was buried in 1691 in Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, Connecticut. His will is recorded at New Haven. “Find a Grave.com” states Burial: Center Church on the Green Churchyard New Haven New Haven County Connecticut, USA

 

Puritans did not often wear black, as black fabric was very expensive.

 

In England, William served with Cromwell’s Ironsides. As Puritans, the Ironsides often attributed their glory in battle to God. Their religious beliefs extended to the field where they adhered to strict ethical codes. In quarters, they did not drink or gamble. They did not partake in the traditional spoils of war and did not rape, or pillage defeated opponents (although their religious zeal sometimes led them to be merciless to Catholic enemies).

William Bradley was unmarried when his mother died.

From A Compilation of Descendents of Roger Prichard: The Bradley family was from West Riding, Yorkshire, England, and were staunch Cromwell men. Sir William’s title and the right to bear arms were conferred by Henry VIII. [Since Henry VIII died in 1547 and Sir William was born in 1597, this conferrence must have been to his father or grandfather.] He was an officer in the Parliamentary Army. After his wife died, Sir William entrusted his eldest son, William, to Theophilus Eaton, William Davenport, and a small band of dedicated men to sailed to the New World in 1638 to found a new colony [New Haven].

William came to the colonies with his step-mother, who later married John Parmalee then John Evarts, both of Guilford, CT. (NEHGR 51:134) (After William Bradley died, Elizabeth married John “Paralee” on November 8, 1653; after his death, she married John Evarts on May 27, 1663. She had no children by either of these husbands.)

William was on the Board of Selectmen 1656-1680; Deputy to the Conn. General Assembly. Children of mentioned in his will: Joseph, Abraham, Benjamin, Nathaniel, Martha, Mary, Esther. . .

He joined Theophilus Eaton, William Davenport, and a dedicated group who sailed to Boston Harbor in 1638. They were supported by the Warwick Patent:

In June, 1638, the Company of Lords and Gentlemen all grantors of the Warwick Patent made John Winthrop, Jr., governor for them of the jurisdiction of Connecticut and sent him with a large amount of money and a great army of carpenters, masons, gardeners, and experienced engineers to found a settlement at the mouth of the Connecticut River with proper accommodations for themselves, but more especially to construct such houses as might be fit to receive gentlemen of quality presently come from England.

The construction of the settlement took three years. In 1641, Eaton, Davenport, Rev. Peter Prudden, the young William Bradley, and others finally reached New Haven.

Some interesting reading on the Warwick Patent and the history of the settlement of the mouth of the Connecticut River is available at the Old Saybrook Web site.

William Bradley settled early at New Haven, where in 1644 he took the oath of fidelity. He came from the West Riding of Yorkshire.  He arrived in America with his brothers, thought to be six or seven in number.

 

It is written he was the first settler in North Haven Ct.  The land had belonged to Governor Theophilus Eaton.

 

William was on the Board of Selectmen 1656-1680; Deputy to the Conn. General Assembly.

Children of William Bradley and Alice Prichard are:

 

  1. Joseph Bradley christened 4 Jan 1645 and died 1705
  2. Isaac Bradley born 1655 and died 10 Jul 1716
  3. Martha Bradley born Oct 1648 and died 1692/1693 m. Samuel Munson 26 Oct 1665 in New Haven, Connecticut
  4. Abraham Bradley born 24 Oct 1650 and died 19 Oct 1718
  5. Mary Bradley born 30 Apr 1653 and died 26 Sep 1724
  6. Benjamin Bradley born 8 Apr 1657 and died 1728
  7. Esther Bradley born 29 Sep 1659 in New Haven, New Haven, CT
  8. Nathaniel Bradley born 26 Feb 1661 and died 17 Aug 1743
  9. 9.        Sarah Bradley born 21 Jun 1665 New Haven, CT, m. Samuel Brockett ,died on 26 October 1742 in New Haven, Connecticut

Stephen R. Bradley: letters of a Revolutionary War patriot and Vermont senator

By Stephen Row Bradley, Dorr Carpenter, H. N. Muller

 

Amidst cultivated and pleasant fields: a bicentennial history of North Haven, Connecticut

by Lucy McTeer Brusic.

974.67 Brusic  (c 1986)

 

The Brockett Family of Connecticut

 
“It is a highly coveted privilege to number one's ancestors among the Fathers of the Republic.”
 
HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION

RELATING TO THE EARLY SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAVEN
AND WALLINGFORD, CONNECTICUT, THE HOMES
OF THE EARLY BROCKETTS.

Taken from the works of Edward J. Brockett and Sheila Wade

In 1620, when the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, New England was one vast wilderness, inhabited only by Indians and wild beasts. For the first decade immigration was very light, and but few settlements were made. The oppressive acts of King Charles I. led to quite an increase of immigration between 1630 and 1640. 

On the twenty-sixth of June, 1637, the ship Hector with its consort, arrived in Boston, bringing a company of immigrants, who received a warmer welcome than ordinary. 
It was composed of persons of opulence, intelligence, and business experience, who had come with their families and whole estates from England for a home in America.

The following is the passenger list for the vessel Hector, which brought the passengers accompanying John Davenport and Theophilus Eaton to Connecticut in 1637. (There is another ship called the Hector that brought the first Scottish Highlanders to Nova Scotia in the mid-1700’s, but the Hector Heritage Foundation in Nova Scotia states that the ship that brought the Davenport/Eaton party is a different vessel.)

The Hector that brought the Davenport party to Massachusetts was a new vessel of 250 tons, which had already made a previous passage to Massachusetts Bay. The records indicate that the ship actually arrived in Massachusetts, but other references mention that the Hector also took the party to Connecticut in late 1637 or 1638. A passenger ship list for the trip from Massachusetts Bay to New Haven, Connecticut has not been located.

The ship Hector brought several of our ancestors to the new world on her voyages, including:

Thomas Nash

Richard Sperry

John Brockett

John Cooper

Samuel Hotchkiss

Passengers on the Hector sold their belongings in preparation for the sailing, but then the English government impressed the ship for the service of the crown. The owners petitioned for its release in January 1637, but the ship was not freed until May. According to the records of John Winthrop of Massachusetts Bay, the ship arrived in Boston (from London, England) on June 26, 1637.

 

 

  • John & Elizabeth Davenport
  • Theophilus Eaton
  • Old Mrs. Eaton, his mother
  • Anne Eaton, second wife of Theophilus Eaton and daughter of George Lloyd Bishop of Chester and widow of Thomas Yale
  • The children of Anne Eaton by her former marriage
  • Edward Hopkins
  • Richard Malbon
  • Nathaniel Rowe
  • William Andrews
  • Henry Browning
  • James Clark
  • Jasper Crane
  • Jeremy Dixon
  • Nicholas Elsey
  • Francis Hall
  • Robert Hill
  • William Ives
  • George Smith
  • George Ward
  • Lawrence Ward
  • Ezekiel Cheever
  • Edward Bannister
  • Old Jewry
  • Richard Beach
  • John Brockett
  • John Budd
  • John Cooper
  • Arthur Halbidge
  • Mathew Hitchcock
  • Andrew Hull
  • Andrew Low
  • Andrew Messenger
  • Mathew Moulthrop
  • Francis Newman
  • Robert Newman
  • Richard Osborn
  • Edward Patteson
  • John Reader
  • William Thorp
  • Samuel Whitehead.


The Journey and Arrival

The bulk of cargo on the ships which left England for New England consisted of apparel, bedding food, arms, ammunition and seeds. Neat-cattles and goats were usually taken, and sometimes horses. The Massachusetts Bay Company had a rule, that a ship of two hundred tons should not carry above one hundred passengers and other ships adhered to the same proportions. The cost was 5 pounds for an adult and 4 pounds for a ton of goods. The voyage took usually two months and the Hector arrived in Boston on the 26th of June, 1637. Another ship traveled with them as was common. However, the name of that ship has been lost. Records of voyages tell of the seasickness.

They remained in Boston for about nine months. They were well received by their fellow Puritans and were asked to stay in Salem. It is important to note that Mr. Davenport arrived during the trial of Anne Hutchinson who was challenging the authority of the Church. She was a popular charismatic woman who held discussions in her home concerning the state of sanctified man. She held that “the fact that a man behaved in a sanctified manner, breaking none of God’s laws, was no evidence that he was saved” (Morgan, Puritan Dilemma. p.138).Mr. Davenport was involved in the trial and tried to convince Anne Hutchinson to conform. It appears that Anne was very intelligent and attracted followers. Her downfall may have been that she made a fool of those who were in charge. In any case Anne Hutchinson was banned to Rhode Island. Difference was not tolerated in the community. Anyone, who held differing points of view, was seen as a threat.

Whether this turmoil led to the decision for John Davenport and company to leave is speculative. It is recorded that,” Mr. Davenport and his companions gave as their principal reason for removing to New Haven after nine months’ stay in the older colony, that most of them were Londoners, who were not well fitted for an agricultural, as of a commercial, settlement: which they thought might be formed with better prospects at Quinnipiac than at any unoccupied place on the Bay” (McClure p.274). Scouts had been sent to survey the area of the harbor and to determine if the Native Americans were amendable to trade. Davenport did not have a Charter from England to settle this area. The Dutch were in New York and it was feared that they would come into the Connecticut area.

According to research found in Historic Connecticut by Marguerite Allis the arrival is described as follows: “In the Spring of 1638 a heavily laden sloop rounded the eastern point and crept up a little waterway, which at the time entered the bay near where the railroad now stands, and landed its passengers at a point where College Street now meets George.” (Allis, p.209)

The colonists spent 14 months erecting their homesteads and clearing the lands. The new settlers had two contracts to negotiate in their new settlement; one was with the Native Americans, the Quinnipiacs whose sachem was Mamouquin. The other contract was among themselves. They assembled on June 4, 1639 in a barn for the purpose of organizing a civil government. They signed their contract and twelve men of good standing lay the foundation of the new church. Only members in good standing of a Church were considered freemen of the colony and allowed to vote in local governance.

Rev. John Davenport had become celebrated in London, first as a preacher, second for his courageous residence with and care of his flock during the dreadful plague in 1625, when the clergy generally fled, and, third, for coming in conflict with Archbishop Laud on account of his non-conformist views and through whose persecution he was led to withdraw from the Established Church and form a Puritan congregation in London. 

Theophilus Eaton was a prosperous merchant, Deputy Governor of the East Land Company, and who for several years had resided in Denmark as an agent of King Charles I. On his return to London he left the Established Church and became a member of the Puritan congregation of the Rev. John Davenport. He had been one of the original patentees of the Charter of Massachusetts.

 Not only the people of Boston, but the whole Colony of Massachusetts were desirous that this company should settle within its Commonwealth and made liberal proposals to them, but this was not in accord with the purposes of either Davenport or Eaton. Davenport's idea seemed to be to found a colony which should be absolutely controlled by the church; only church members eligible to office, or even allowed to vote, transferring to this country the English idea of "Church and State"; only, instead of the Episcopal Church, it must be a Church of the Congregational order with which he was identified. 

During the summer of 1637 that portion of the southern shore of Connecticut, lying between Saybrook and Fairfield, had been discovered through the pursuit of the Pequots by the Colonists, and on the thirty-first of August, 1637, Theophilus Eaton headed an exploring party and came by water from Boston to the mouth of the Quinnipiac River. They were so well pleased with the locality that they left seven of their number to hold possession and prepare for the permanent occupation of the place. In the ensuing April (1638) the whole company, including John Brockett, whose descendants are given in this history, arrived from Boston. 

On the Sunday following their arrival the company assembled under the trees twice for public worship. Mr. Davenport preached from the text: "Then was Jesus led up of the Spirit to be tempted of the Devil," warning his hearers that even here temptations are to be encountered and the fight with Satan has not ended, though they have changed the battleground from London to the wilderness. Ever after public worship was maintained. 

Among their first acts they purchased from the Indians two tracts of land, one of which covered many miles on each side of the Quinnipiac River, extending northward ten miles. By a fair treaty and subsequent fair dealings the Colonists made firm friends of the Indians, and were never seriously molested. A town plan was laid out and house lots assigned to each planter, according to the number of persons in his family and the amount of estate on which he was able and willing to pay taxes. 

On June 4, 1639, " a meeting of all the free planters was held to consult about settling the civil government according to God, and the nominations of persons that might be found, by consent of all, fittest in all respects for the foundation work of a church which was intended to be gathered in Quinipiac."

At this meeting a covenant was entered into by the proprietors and in a formal and very solemn manner a resolution was adopted, "that only church members shall be free burgesses and they only shall choose among themselves the magistrates and officers." 

This covenant was signed by all the freeholders. Theophilus Eaton was elected Governor, and reelected each year from 1638 until his death in 1657. John Brockett, a civil engineer and surveyor, was appointed "to lay out the large square in nine equal sections”; also to lay out the "neck of land." Later, in the Colonial Records, mention is made of the accuracy of the angles and the equality of the sections as laid out by him. These remain to this day unaltered in boundaries, and comprise what is now known as the New Haven Green and the grounds of Yale University. 

On December 12, 1641, the town "ordered that a free school shall be sett up in this towne," which is said to be the first free school in New England. 

The interest of the colonists in education was further manifested in 1644 (fifty-seven years before Yale College was founded), in the passage of the following: "It is ordered that Joseph Atwater and William Davis shall receive of everyone in this plantation, whose heart is willing to contribute, a peck of wheat, or the value of it, for the reliefe of poor scholars at the College at Cambridge" (Harvard). 

Sunday was observed with the greatest reverence, no one being excused from attending "meeting" except for sickness. Non-attendance was punished by fines and sometimes by whipping. 

New Haven was from the first a compactly settled town of more than one hundred and thirty families, and many of its inhabitants not only refined but wealthy. New Haven excelled all the other plantations in New England in the elegance and costliness of its domestic architecture. 

Family worship was an important feature of domestic life in a Puritan household. It was important because of its frequency, regularity, and seriousness. Whenever the family came to the table for breakfast, dinner, or supper, there was a grace before the meat, and when they left it, a grace after meat, every person standing by his chair while the blessing was asked and the thanks were given. The day was begun with worship, which included the reading of Scripture and prayer, and ended with a similar service, all standing during the prayer. 

The simple, regular life of a planter's family was favorable to health. As compared with the present time, there was but little excitement and but little worry for man or woman. News from home was communicated to the neighbors by "letters of intelligence," an institution which during the existence of the colony began to give place to printed newspapers. These were passed from hand to hand. Corn was husked and houses were "raised" by neighborly kindness. The whole plantation sympathized with a family afflicted with sickness, and the neighbors assisted them in nursing and watching. 

Families entertained travelers after the manner of Christians of the first century, and highly prized their visits as seasons of fellowship and opportunities for learning the news of the day. 

In 1667 the General Assembly of Connecticut granted to "the town of New Haven, liberty to make a village on the East River, if they see it capable for such a thing, provided they settle a village there within four years from May next." 

In 1670 the same authority incorporated "New Haven Village" as a town, and named it Wallingford. 

It appears that Abraham Doolittle and John Peck were on the ground in 1668, and John Brockett and John Moss in the autumn of 1669, which fact was undoubtedly the cause of their being selected as a committee to superintend and manage the affairs of the new village, but it was not until the month of April, 1670, that the first permanent settlement at Wallingford was made. 

In May, 1672, after the planters had received their respective allotments, built their houses, and had assumed the form of a regular and settled community, the committee who had arranged all the preliminaries and incipient stages of the new plantation surrendered all their power and the title to the whole territory into the hands of the planters, who thereby became a corporate body; in other words, a town. The lands within the town limits became thus the property of the town, to be by them disposed of in such ways and to such persons as they might deem fit. 

In these various transfers of the land, from the Town of New Haven to the committee, thence to the associated planters, and ultimately to individual proprietors, no money or consideration of any kind was paid. The land was worth literally nothing until actually settled and cleared. From time to time, as families became larger and individuals became able to bring more land under cultivation, additional allotments were made by town vote to each planter. At various times there were 'divisions' in this manner, until the whole territory was occupied. 

In arranging these divisions, the whole population was classed into three 'ranks,' according to their ability to pay taxes. In all assessments, the first rank paid double the amount of tax charged on the 'lowest rank,' and one-third more than the middle rank. 

In the New Haven Colony Laws for 1656 we find that the head of the family should: "Duly observe the course, carriage, and behaviour, of every such single person, whether he, or she, walk diligently in a constant lawful employment." 

So careful were they in guarding the character of their new settlement that even the land which was appropriated to individuals as their private property was held under the condition that no sale was to be made to any stranger until the character of the proposed purchaser had been examined and approved by the town and leave granted by express vote of the town for such transfer of land. The restrictions in regard to the sale of property gave them a community of sterling integrity, religious character, and loyalty to each other and to their country. 

"The 'hopp ground land' was that which produced the materials for making hoops (A circular band of metal or wood put around a cask or barrel to bind the staves together.). Such land, though swampy, was then most valuable in the town. For in the great scarcity of a circulating medium, and of means for purchasing all foreign produce, these hoops and staves always found a great demand and a ready sale in the West Indies. Of course our farmers in trading with the New Haven merchants found these hoop-poles as useful as cash. Accordingly we find in the records of the town that these 'hopp ground lands' were most carefully managed, were granted out in very small quantities, and in the various grants recorded, each man was very careful that a piece of this precious land should be included in his farm. 

Hoops were made in large quantities in the winter season, when the farmers had nothing to do, and commanded from $20 to $45 per thousand in New Haven, according to their size and the wood from which they were made. Hoop poles twelve feet long brought $40 per thousand. 

It is difficult at the present day to imagine the immense difficulties our fathers had to undergo in traveling from one town to another. Over mountains, through swamps, across rivers, fording, or upon rafts, with no compass to point out their irregular way; now in the open space of the forest, where the sun looked in; now under the shade of the old trees; now struggling through the entanglement of bushes and vines, with perhaps a "bridle path" cut through the trees. Wherever a road had been built it was little better than none at all. 

Our ancestors wrought with a love and kindly fellowship with Nature. They planted and admired the Elm, the Oak, and the Chestnut for their beauty and for their long life. Their descendants seem to have inherited their love for these trees, as New Haven still abounds in its Elms and rejoices in being called "The City of Elms." 

The religious convictions of these early settlers influenced their social life. In view of the frequency with which the planters were convened in greater or less companies, it is evident that, however affected by their Puritanism, they were a social people. 

It is well, therefore, to trace the career of their descendants, who have been very respectable, well-to-do, religious, practical, temperate, industrious and honest.

Anna Brockett

1715-1762

Mother of Thirteen

 

Anna Brockett (AKA Hulda Earl Brockett)

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Born February 2, 1715 in Wallingford, New Haven CT, Anna(John3,Samuel2,John1) was the daughter of John Brockett and Hulda (Earls, Ells).  Anna married Captain Gideon Hotchkiss, Jan. 18, 1737 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT. She died 01 Aug 1762 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., CT, at the age of 46, shortly after the birth of her stillborn child “Benoni” (“Child of my sorrow”). He was her 13th child.

 

In Tuttle’s Genealogy she is spoken of as an “eminently pious woman”.

 

Gideon Hotchkiss’ devout and devoted wife Anna lived with him long enough to pass the silver anniversary.

 

“In Branson’s History of Waterbury there is noted in the family record the birth of this babe which was a boy, with the peculiar parenthetical note “(died before it was born)” and yet bearing a name Benoni, which biblically means “Child of my sorrow.” Anne Brocket was a genuine and original Colonial Dame and her motherhood has made children and children’s children even down to the present generation “rise up and call her blessed.”

 

A single instance reveals her piety and her faith in the power of prayer. On the morning of July 8, 1758, she forsook her family and went out into the forest primeval of Prospect, that she might spend the day interceding with God for the life of her husband, who was then a lieutenant and engaged in the French and Indian War. At dusk she returned, her face shining with a priory like that of Moses descending from the Mount, and she announced to her reverently subdued children that their father’s life would be spared and that he would return home in safety. That was the very day of the fearful carnage at Ticonderoga, through which Lieutenant Gideon Hotchkiss passed in safety and from which he did return to his family. How the assurance was revealed to her I know not, but shame on the one who suggests that it was superstition.”

 

Children of Anna Brockett and Gideon Hotchkiss:

 

  1. Jesse Hotchkiss Born: 09 OCT 1738 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 29 SEP 1776 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT  Spouse: Charity Mallory
  2. David Hotchkiss Born: 05 APR 1740 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT  Spouse: Abigail DOUGLAS; Peninah TODD
  3. Abraham Hotchkiss Born: 03 MAY 1742 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 03 MAY 1742 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT (29 30 31)
  4. Abraham Hotchkiss Born: 25 MAR 1743 in Waterbury, New Haven, Died: 29 OCT 1806 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Spouse: Hannah WEED
  5. Gideon Hotchkiss Born: 31 DEC 1744 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 06 JAN 1819
  6. Huldah Hotchkiss Born: 27 JUN 1747 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT \Died: 28 MAR 1774 Spouse: Joseph PAYNE
  7. Anna Hotchkiss  Born: 22 OCT 1749 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 17 FEB 1835 Spouse: Reuben WILLIAMS
  8. Amos Hotchkiss Born: 24 NOV 1751 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT \Died: 13 MAY 1820 Spouse: Abigail SCOTT
  9. Submit Hotchkiss Born: 02 JUN 1753 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Spouse: David PAYNE
  10. Titus Hotchkiss Born: 26 JUN 1755 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  11. Eben Hotchkiss  Born: 13 DEC 1757 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  12. Asahel Hotchkiss Born: 15 FEB 1760 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: in Sharon, Litchfield, CT Spouses: Sarah WILLIAMS; Phebe MERRIMAN Asahel was a drummer boy in the Revolutionary War.
  13. Benoni: still-born Hotchkiss Born/Died: 27 JUL 1762 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT

 

John Brockett

1609-1690

Immigrant Ancestor

One of the Principal Founders of

New Haven and Wallingford, Connecticut

And

Elizabethtown New Jersey

Graduate of Cambridge University

Appointed Surgeon during King Phillip’s War

 

John Brockett

Samuel Brockett

John Brockett

Anna Brockett

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John Brockett (1) was born in England in 1609. He married Mary Blackwell on 14 Aug 1635 in St. Michaels, Hertfordshire, England.  He signed a will on 3 Mar 1690 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT. and died on 12 Mar 1690 in Windsor, Hartford, CT. He is buried in the Center Street Cemetery, Wallingford CT. He was a surveyor, civil engineer, and surgeon.

Signature from his marriage license.

John and John Mott each pledged £100 to secure a license for John to marry Mary Blackwell. This was a large sum of money.

 

 

 

 

 

Bond

Latin English translation
1. Nouerint uniuersi per presentes nos Iohannem Brockett parochia Sancti Michaelis in Comitatu Hertf’

2. generosum et Iohannem Mott de villa Sancti Albani in Comitatu predicto Glouer

3. teneri et firmiter obligari venerabili viro Thome Westfield sacre Theologie

4. professori Archidiacono Diui Albani London’ diocesis in centum libris legalis monete Anglie

5. soluendis eidem Archidiacono aut suo certo Attornato – Executoribus Administratoribus vel Assignatis

6. suis Ad quam quidem solucionem bene et fideliter faciendam obligamus nos et

7. vtrumque nostrum per se pro toto et in solido heredes, Executores et Administratores nostros

8. firmiter per presentes sigillis nostris sigillatas date decimo quarto die mensis

9. Augusti Anno Regni domini nostri Caroli dei gratia Angliæ, Scotiæ,

10. Franciæ et Hiberniæ Regis fidei Defensoris &c vndecimo 1635

1. May everyone know by this document that we, John Brockett of the parish of St Michaels in the County of Hertford

2. Gentleman and John Mott of the town of St Albans in the same county, Glover,

3. are held and firmly bound to the venerable Doctor of Divinity Thomas Westfield

4. Archdeacon of St Albans in the diocese of London in £100 of legal tender of England

5. to be paid to the same Archdeacon or his certified attorney, executors, administrators or assigns

6. to making which payment indeed well and faithfully to do we bind ourselves and

7. each of us by himself for the whole [sum] and [we bind] for the whole our heirs, executors and administrators

8. firmly by this document sealed with our seals. Given on the 14th of the month

9. of August in the year the reign of our lord Charles thanks to God of England, Scotland,

10. France and Ireland king, defender of the faith etc the   1635

 

John was educated at Cambridge in England; (admitted 23 April 1634 at age 21) was a man of means and good manners, possessed tremendous courage and faith, believed in the rule of law, democracy and freedom for individuals to worship in the manner they chose. He gave up a safe, secure and comfortable life in England and helped to carve a city. John Davenport valued the individual and saw education and faith as a path towards success for everyone.

 

They legally purchased land from the natives or Indians, lived in peace with them and protected them from enemies. Over the years John and his fellow citizens built a city they called New Haven in the state we call Connecticut. John also assisted in building the city of Elizabeth, New Jersey. Then he joined 100 other hardy, brave and industrious individuals and ventured north from the safe and now comfortable confines of New Haven into the wolf and hostile Indian infested wilderness. Again they brought peace and prosperity to the natives while carving a new settlement from the forest that would eventually bear the name of Wallingford. Today over one million people live in the cities John helped to create. John raised his family in Wallingford with his wife, Mary Blackwell.  His story follows.

 

John Brockett, the first person of the name of Brockett, of whom any record can be found in this country, was born in England in 1609 and came to America in 1637, in the ship Hector, with Rev. John Davenport and Theophilus Eaton. The ship arrived in Boston June 26, 1637.

 

 In regard to the persons who accompanied Rev. John Davenport to this country and who joined him in the settlement of New Haven, G. H. Hollister, in his “History of Connecticut,” says,

 

“They were gentlemen of wealth and character, with their servants and household effects. They were, for the most part, from London and had been bred to mercantile and commercial pursuits. Their coming was hailed at Boston with much joy, for they were the most opulent of all the companies who had immigrated to New England.”

 

Shortly after the arrival of the Hector in Boston, Eaton and a few others, unwilling to join the Massachusetts Colony, explored the coast along Long Island Sound, selecting a tract of land near the Quinipiac River, the present site of the City of New Haven, on which they left seven of their number to hold it for the winter.

 

In the spring of 1638 (April 13,) Davenport with others, among whom was John Brockett, followed. They purchased the lands at Quinipiac of the Indians, and, “taking the Bible for their guide,” formed an independent government or “Plantation Covenant” upon strictly religious principles. Prosperity attended them and they laid the foundations of a town and called it New Haven.

t>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>John Davenport

John Brockett seems to have been one of the leading men of the company, as his name more often appears in the records of the New Haven colony than of any man in civil life, except that of Theophilus Eaton.

 

He was a man of good judgment and one in whom the people had confidence, as shown from the fact, that in cases of trouble, or difference of opinion, he was generally appointed by the Planters on a committee to adjust matters.

 

When the Indians made claims obnoxious to the Settlers, he was appointed “one of a committee of four to investigate and advise with the Indians.”

 

In 1660 when differences arose between the Conn. Colony at Hartford, and the New Haven Colony, as to boundary lines John Brockett was appointed one of the Commission to settle the troubles.

 

He had a widely extended reputation as a Civil Engineer and Surveyor, and in June, 1639, laid out the large square, (which is now the centre of the City of New Haven, including the Common and the site of the Yale College buildings) in nine equal sections. Mention is made in the Colonial Records of the perfection of this work, especially of the angles. The same boundaries still continue to be used.

 

The Nine Squares of New Haven, Connecticut (Follow link to larger map.)
John Brockett’s land is marked with a blue bar
Produced in 1641 Courtesy Yale University Library

The Brockett Map

A few years later the Governor of New Jersey deputed John Brockett “to lay out, survey, and bound the said bounds of Elizabeth Towne, (now the City of Elizabeth,) the planting fields, town lots, and to lay out every particular man’s proposition, according to his allotments and the directions of the Governor, for the avoiding of all controversies and disputes concerning the same, having had certain notice of the good experience, knowledge, skill and faithfulness of John Brockett in the surveying and laying out of land.”

 

This work was performed by John Brockett, and an allotment of land was made to him in the town of Elizabeth, which he held until 1670, when the record of its sale to Samuel Hopkins appears.

 

In order to perform this work, John Brockett removed temporarily to Elizabethtown in Dec. 1667, residing there until 1670. The First General Assembly of New Jersey convened in Elizabethtown and was constituted May 26, 1668. The town had chosen

John Ogden, Senior, and John Brockett to represent them in the House of Burgesses.*

 

There is very little of official record, in this country, concerning his birth. The tradition has existed, for two hundred years in New Haven, that John Brockett was the eldest son of Sir John Brockett, of Brockett Hall, Hertfordshire, England; that, on account of his Puritanical ideas, his father (who had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth) disinherited him and removed his name from all records, and that John then gave up all claims to the title and estates of the Brocketts in England, in order to join the Puritan band which came with Rev. John Davenport to America.

 

In one of the Connecticut religious papers, published in 1868, we find the following:

 

John Brockett, the eldest son of Sir John Brockett, of the county of Herts, Eng., who was a well known loyalist of the time of Charles I, becoming convinced of the truth of the Gospel as preached by the Puritans, relinquished his birthright and all his prospects of honor and fame, joined himself to the little company of Rev. John Davenport, emigrated to New England and settled at New Haven in 1637. Of him, as of Moses, it could be said that he preferred to suffer affliction with the people of God than to enjoy the pleasures of Sin for a season.”

 

This is disputed by Raymond W. Madsen here:

http://www.wheathampstead.net/brockett/index.htm

 

Mr. Madsen states that John Brockett is the son of John Brockett “of Mackrey End”, not Sir John Brockett. There is a family connection to Sir John in his theory.

 

So, does the ancestor John Brockett have royal blood? In my opinion, his vast accomplishments in his lifetime make the question of little importance.

 

It has been generally supposed that he was married in England before he came to this country, that his first son was born there, and that his wife followed him in 1644. We find, however, the tombstone of his first son (in the Montowese cemetery) states his death in 1720, aged 78 years, which would show that he was born in 1642. This, with the fact that nothing appears in the Colonial Records in regard to John Brockett (excepting his tax) from the middle of the year 1640 to the end of the year 1641, leads the writer to the opinion that he returned to England, spending a year or more there, during which time he married, and that his wife did not arrive here until 1644 or 1645.

 

In 1646 a seat was assigned in the church to “Sister Brockett” it is evident they married between 1640 and 1646.

 

Among the many items in the records of New Haven Colony regarding John Brockett we note the following:

 

June 4, 1639. The name of John Brockett appears as a Signer of the Covenant for Civil Government.

 

“Appointed to lay out the large square in nine equal sections.”

 

“Appointed to lay out forthwith the ‘Neck of land,’ according to the allotments.”

 

June, 1641. In the Tax list, against his name, 1 person, 15 Estates, Land in 1st division, 314 acres; Land on the Neck, y 2 of 2\ acres ; Land in Meadow, 5 acres. June, 1643. Fined one shilling for coming late to the Military Training. Feb., 1645. Ordered by the General Courte to survey certain lands. Oct., 1647. Appointed Inspector of Highways.

March, 1648. Awarded by the General Courte 10 shillings per 1000 for killing blackbirds.

June, 1649.

 

In second division of Upland, the “Meadow” is granted to John Brockett and Thomas Barnes. June, 1653. General Courte ordered “That as John Brockett has spent much time and provided many things for the Soldiers, the Magistrates of New Haven allow him therefore, as they see cause.” June, 1654. The General Courte appointed its proportion of Soldiers to co-operate with a fleet sent by Cromwell, against the hostile intentions of the Dutch on the Hudson River, and appointed John Brockett as Surgeon.

 

June, 1654. John Brockett was appointed one of the Commission to settle the troubles with the Indians. This Commission was kind to the Indians, and John Brockett helped them to survey their land and fence it in, that the cattle and hogs should not spoil their corn. June, 1660. The General Courte appointed John Brockett one of a Commission to settle the differences between the Colony at Hartford and the New Haven Colony, as to boundary lines. From June, 1675, to June, 1676, the bloody war against the Conn.

Troops called “King Phillip’s War” raged. Six hundred of the Colonists were killed and the cost was over $1,000,000. During this war John Brockett was under appointment as Surgeon.

                                                                

John Brockett was Deputy to the General Courte of Conn, during the years 1671, 1678, 1680 to ’82 and 1685. Year book of Colonial Wars, 1899- 1902.

 

In C. S. Livermore’s “Republic of New Haven” he states “That Governor Eaton proposed in court that an assize of bread should be established, to overcome the diminutive size of the baker’s loaves, about which there was much murmuring, and enquired if any one had a book that described the usual sizing of bread. John Brockett said that he owned one, and was requested to lend it to the Governor. This was one of the first deliberate reversions to English example on record, as the English plan, enumerating three lawful kinds of bread was embodied in the Colonial Record.”

                                                                                                                                               

As the land bought by the Colony of New Haven extended several miles from the town of New Haven, the plan of forming a new town on the location now known as Wallingford was agitated early in 1669. At this time wolves in thousands infested the few settlements in that direction, killing the cattle, carrying off the sheep and, by their unearthly howling at night, added horrors to the location. The Indians, who were very numerous, were only friendly as influenced by fear.

 

In the autumn of 1669 John Brockett with about one hundred persons from New Haven removed there. These settlers appointed “John Brockett, John Moss, Abraham Doolittle and Samuel Street to manage all plantation affairs in ye said village.”

 

It was necessary to erect houses and to fortify them, to make preparations for the covering and feeding their cattle, and roads had to be built. It was pioneer work, but the settlers who had left the old world to escape despotism were ready for hardship.

 

Authority was given by the General Courte to form a village and call it Wallingford. The same committee was instructed “to distribute the allotments of land, as shall best suit the conditions of the place and ye inhabitants thereof, and to procure some able and fit man to dispense the word of God among them.”

                                                                                                                                               King Philip’s War

In the first allotment of land 38 plots were given to 38 families, each receiving either 12 acres or 8 acres according to the location. John Brockett received 12 acres, and his son, John, 8 acres.

 

They found still greater trouble than New Haven had, in the matter of currency. Hoop poles were received by the New Haven merchants as cash, so we find that the raising of hoop poles was encouraged by the following enactment, “ordered that every planter should have, according to their rank, four, three or two, acres of the choice land upon the River called ‘hopp ground’ beginning at Pilgrims’ Harbor. Four acres of this hopp land, upon Pilgrims’ Harbor, on both sides of the river were granted to John Brockett thus showing that he was of the highest rank among the planters. When other settlers came they were not allowed to buy any land, until their application had been considered at a public town meeting and referred to a committee for investigation. If the committee, after careful examination, found the testimonials satisfactory, they recommended that a portion of land be allotted to the applicant.

 

In the establishment of Wallingford we find adopted many principles and laws which greatly influenced the lives of the residents and their descendants, and, of course, affected the descendants of John Brockett. While such laws seem, at this day, unnecessary, they demonstrate that the early settlers regarded character as of more importance than money, and this led to the gathering in Wallingford of men of such sterling integrity and religious principles that for several generations their descendants were greatly influenced thereby, and their moral tone was notably good.

 

In this new settlement John Brockett at once became one of the leading men, and was called to fill many public offices, and, after its incorporation, for many years represented the town in the General Assembly.

 

His house lot was “No. 1 at the extreme south end of the village 40 rods long and 20 rods wide, subsequently extended to Wharton’s Brook.”

 

An Indian deed dated May 24, 1681, gave to John Brockett, John Moss, Abraham Doolittle and John Peck, land two miles in breadth east and west, and the whole length of said Wallingford bounds.

 

Feb. 15, 1675 was observed as a day of fasting in Wallingford, with reference to the organization of a church, and 13 settlers were designated (John Brockett being one of the number) who decided “that there be a church of Christ gathered to walk according to the Congregational way.”

 

John Brockett died in Wallingford, Conn., March 12, 1690, aged 80 years. His will, made nine days before his death, reads as follows:

 

The Will of John Brockett

 

I, John Brockett, of the towne of Wallingford, being sound in body, yet having a composed, good understanding and memory, I do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner following:

 

I give to my eldest son, John Brockett, all my lands and housings that I have not given deeds of gift or now sold, and all such meadows.

 

Also, I give to my grandchild, John Brockett, that lives with me, two oxen, furthermore give to my son, John, the one half of my movable estate.

 

I give to my daughter, Silence Bradley, also a quarter part of my moveable estate.

 

Out of the other quarter, I give to my son Samuel 5 pounds sterling. Also to my son Jabez, two oxen, cart and plow, also to my son Benjamin’s two daughters 20 shillings each. To my daughter Mary Pennington 20 shillings. Also to John Payne (married Abigail) 20 shillings. And in case there should not be enough in this quarter part movables to pay my debts and funeral charges and these legacies, what wants must be taken out of the fore mentioned movable estate. Furthermore, I give my son John my wearing apparel and also appoint him to be my executor unto this will and testament, 3 Mar. 1689-90.

 

An Inventory of the estate of Mr. John Brockett late of Wallingford deceased …

 

Imprimis  
3 cowes with 3 calves. 12Ł. 15s / 2 cowes. 8Ł. / 3 two yeareolds. 6Ł. / 3 oneyeareold. 3Ł.    29:15:00
2 oxen 10Ł. The halfe of the house, barne & orchard & the land adjoining 56Ł    66:00:00
A farme of out land of 100 acres    25:00:00
A cart & wheels with all jrons belong thereto, one plow with all jrons
belonging thereunto, one yoake, 3 chains, a new plowshare & a colter
old jron tools, hoes, axes, horse traces, 3 augers & a payre of fetters
   09:02:00
One gun & sword 1Ł. 19s. one payr of stilyards. 18s / one brasse kettle. 4Ł.    06:13:00
One warming pan & brasse skimmer 14s. pewter & spoones & 2 candlesticks 4Ł. 8s    05:02:00
Two skilletts. 14s. one brass kettle 10s. / 3 jron potts, one jron kettle, one
jron skillett, 2 payre of pothooks & one tramell
   02:14:00
One fryeing pan, one spitt, fire shovell, tongs & one hamer
one gridjron, one axe & one morter
   01:00:00
A pewter still 12s. / wooden ware. 1Ł. 10s. earthen ware 4s.    02:06:00
A bed, bed clothing & linnens 14Ł. 14s. A trowell 2s. 6d half a thousand of pins 1s. 3d.    14:17:09
Sowing silke 1s. 10d./ 2 chests & a box 1Ł. 10s. thread & twine 3s. 9d.    01:15:07
by wearing clothes. 3Ł. 11s 1 cap. 2s. for neckclothes & caps 1Ł. 4s.    04:17:00
One box. 4s. cushins & a joint stoole 4s. Inkye & indyan corne 2Ł. 1 s. 1 acre wheat on the ground 1Ł.    03:09:00
   Apprized by us this 7th of Aprill 1690: Samuell Anderson
Tho: Curtisse       9 Townesmen
 172:11:04
An addition to the forementioned estate  
Imprimis  
For severall acres of meadow. 150Ł. / 2 oxen 10Ł. 10s. / 3 cowes & 3 calves. 13Ł  173:10:00
2 cowes & one bull 10Ł. / 2 stears. 7Ł. / 2 rugs, 2 blankets & 2 pillows 5Ł. 10s.    22:10:00
2 sheets & 2 pillowbeers 1Ł. 5s. / weareing apparrell, a hat & a payre of shoes. 2Ł    03:05:00
Two old curtains & two earthen potts    00:05:06
   Apprized by us this 8th of Aprill 1690:  199:10:06
        James Heaton  172:11:04
        John Barnes                                                                                                    Totall 372: 01:10

You may download Edward J Brockett’s book on the history of the Brockett family for free or read it online at http://www.archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc.

E.J. Brockett said: “This generation…is looking up…to catch an inspiration from the characters of those who laid the foundation of this [America], the most glorious nation of all times.” May our ancestors bring hope, faith and inspiration to you too.

 

Children of John Brockett and Mary Blackwell are:

 

1. John Brockett, b. 1642; m. Elizabeth Doolittle. Became a doctor. Died in Oct 1720

2. Be Fruitful Brockett was born 23 Feb 1645 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut died in 1645

3. Benjamin Brockett 23 Feb 1645, died 1645 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.

4. Mary Brockett, b. Sept. 25, 1646; m. Ephraim Pennington died in 1694

5. Silence Brockett, b. Jan. 4, 1648, m. Joseph Bradley at Milford, Ct.d.25 Oct 1667

6.Benjamin Brockett, b. Dec. 1648, m. Elizabeth Barnes. D.May 1679

7. Abigail Brockett, b. March 10, 1650; m. John Payne, Jan. 22, 1673; d. July 4, 1729

8.Samuel Brockett, b. Jan. 14, 1652; m. Sarah Bradley d.Oct 1742

9. Jabez Brockett, b. 1654; d. 1654.

10. Jabez Brockett, b. Oct. 24, 1656; m. Dorothy Lyman died on 6 Nov 1769

The descendants of John Brockett: one of the original founders of New Haven colony. Illustrated with portraits and armorial bearings; an historical introduction relating to the settlement of New Haven and Wallingford, Connecticut. The English Brocketts. “A pedigree of Brockett,” published in England in 1860

John Brockett

1685- 1753

 

John Brockett

Anna Brockett

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Son of Samuel Brockett and Sarah Bradley, John (Samuel2,John1) was born Nov. 8, 1685.  On the first of March, 1711, he married Huldah Elis (Earls). He died in 12 Jan 1753 in Wallingford, Ct. at the age of 68.

 

Children of John Brockett and Hulda Earls are:

 

  1. Daniel Brockett –Born April 3, 1712;
  2. David Brocket–Born November 28, 1714, died 1761, unmarried;
  3. Anna Brocket–Born Feb. 2, 1716, married Gideon Hotchkiss;
  4. Ebenezer Brocket–Born circa 1717, died 1761;
  5. Christopher Brocket–Born April 9, 1718, lived at Weathersfield, Conn.;
  6. Mehitable Brocket–Born April 3, 1719, died before 1759;
  7. Lois Brocket–Born 1721, married a Mr. Dudley;
  8. Mable Brocket–Born circa 1723, married a Mr. Green, died April 21, 1806;
  9. Elisha Brocket–Born May 31, 1726;
  10. John Brocket–Born Feb. 14, 1728, married Jemima Tuttle.

 

                                                                                     

 < New  Haven Circa 1700

 

 

 

 

Stockings were an important part of a man’s outfit. Fashionable men wore white or grey silk stockings whereas working men wore more durable and less expensive stockings of linen or wool. The shapeliness of a man’s calves, appearing below the tight knee band of the breeches was a desirable trait. Stockings were designed to show off shapely calves. Padding was sometimes added to accentuate a man’s leg.

 

Some form of knee breeches had been worn in European dress since the mid 1600’s. In the 1760’s and 1770’s, breeches were worn fairly full in the legs and the seat, fastened snuggly at the knee. The breeches could be tightened at the back of the waistband with laces or a buckle to make the waistband tight enough to rest on the hips. Thigh length waistcoats concealed the waistline of the breeches.

Neither breeches nor trousers closed with a fly front. A vertical opening was used in the early 1700’s but was not re-introduced until the nineteenth century when it was considered rather risqué. Instead the front opening was formed by a flap or fall of cloth which buttoned to the waistband with three buttons.
For ordinary wear, breeches were made of linen or tow cloth in the summer and wool for cold weather. Fashionable breeches might have been wool broadcloth or silk satin; they fastened at the knee with decorative buckles. The breeches sometimes were made to match the coat but contrasting white breeches were also popular.

 

 

Samuel Brockett

1652-1742

Large Land Owner

Samuel Brockett

John Brockett

Anna Brockett

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Samuel Brockett (John1), son of John Brockett and Mary Blackwell, was born in New Haven, Jan. 14, 1652; bap. Jan. 18, 1652. He married Sarah Bradley on May 23, 1682. He died in Wallingford Oct. 27, 1742. 

He was a public spirited man and, took much interest in the political affairs of the times. He was also a large Real Estate owner. 

In the Colonial Records frequent mention is made of his name. He was appointed Commissioner to determine what highways were needed in the Colony; was awarded 55 acres of land in the distribution of land. His name appears as one of the original proprietors at Wallingford and as owner of valuable "hopplands” at Pilgrims' Harbor. 

In 1701 he was taxed on the Grand List at Wallingford on £82. Sept. 27, 1680, his father, John Brockett, deeded land "to his well beloved son, Samuel." March 27, 1712, he bought from his brother, John, land in Wallingford. 

Children of Samuel Brockett and Sarah Bradley:

1.        Samuel Brockett, b. Feb. 15, 1683; m. Rachel Brown. 
2.        Daniel Brockett, b. Sept. 30, 1684; probably d. Feb. 8, 1740. 
3.        John Brockett, b. Nov. 8, 1685; m. Huldah Ells. 
4.        Joseph Brockett, b. Oct. 25, 1688. 
5.        Josiah Brockett, b. July 25, 1691; d. young. 
6.        Alice Brockett, b. April 23, 1693; probably m. Stephen Curtis, March, 1714.

“The descendants of John Brockett, one of the original founders of New Haven colony: illustrated with portraits and armorial bearings and historical introduction relating to the settlement of New Haven and Wallingford, Connecticut. The English Brocketts. “A pedigree of Brockett,” published in England in 1860″

Nancy P. Brown

1812-1873

Canadian

Mother of Ten Children

 

Nancy Brown

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Nancy Brown was originally from Canada. She was born 30 DEC 1812, and married Israel Shepard, of Montgomery New York June 14, 1833. Nancy died 02 MAR 1873 in Camden, Hillside, Michigan. She is buried in Berg Cemetery, Montgomery, Hillsdale County. Plot: Section 4 Lot 69. Headstone says: Wife of Israel, age 60y 3m 2d

I seem to recall a story about Nancy, that she was born in Ireland, and had a twin sister. On the voyage to America (Canada) her sister died and was “buried at sea”. I can’t find any documentation on this. After their marriage they removed to Genesee County, and later to Ohio. Benjamin, the second son, was born in Bloomfield, Seneca Co., Ohio, Jan. 22, 1848, and the family moved in the spring of 1859 (or 1851 per Hillsdale Cty Biography of son Charles.) to Michigan.

 

Nancy and Israel Shepard were the parents of ten children, three sons and seven daughters.

 

They settled on a farm in Palmyra, Lenawee Co., but two years later removed first to Ransom Twp. and then to Camden Twp., Hillsdale County. Nancy and her husband spent their last years in Hillsdale County.

They lived where the present town of Montgomery stands.

Nancy died on the 2d of March 1873 of spinal meningitis. Mar. 2, 1873  

               Fashions of 1859

Children of Nancy Brown and Israel Shepard are:

 

  1. 1.        Hanna L. Shepard Born in Mont Maos Co., NY 13 Mar 1834, Married Daniel Bernard Kroh
  2. Israel Shepard (possibly the Israel Shepard that was the husband of Sarah, father of Eugene, Alice (Blount) Albert and Benjamin. If that is he, he was born in 1838 and died in 1892, Hillsdale, MI. This is likely because he is buried close to Hannah. Alice (Shepard) Blount attended the funeral of Hannah Shepard, who would have been her Aunt. Also, Henry Kroh, Hannah’s son, purchased land from the heirs of Israel Shepard and his widow, Sarah
  3. 3.        Benjamin Shepard: On the 25th day of October, 1844, he was married to Jane N. Newkirk, at Bloomfield, Fairfield Co., Ohio. He was a lawyer in Hillsdale MI, then a judge. He was one of the trustees of Hillsdale College since it was founded
  4. Eva Loretta Shepard b. 17 may 1856, Republic, OH d. 14 Mar 1946, Married Walter B. Keefer. She was a native of Seneca County, Ohio, who in her girlhood days accompanied her parents, Israel and Nancy Shepard, on their removal to Hillsdale, Michigan.
  5. Charles A. Shepard b. April 17, 1856 Seneca Cty Ohio ; Prosecuting Attorney of Hillsdale County in1888; law partner of his brother, B. P. Shepard, and became Assistant Prosecuting Attorney under the latter. Upon his brother’s death, he was appointed, by Judge Howell, Prosecuting Attorney for the unexpired term. Politically, he is a strong Republican.
  6. Philinda Shepard, married February 9, 1860 to Warren Severance (Mr. Severance was married February 9, 1860, to Philinda Shepard, a daughter of Israel and Nancy (Brown) Shepard, who were the parents of the following named children: Hannah, who married D. B. Kroh; Mary, deceased, who married James McDuell; Israel, also deceased; Mrs. Severance; Lucinda, who married J. Z. Woodworth; and Eva, who married W. B. Keefer. Mr. and Mrs. Severance became the parents of two children: E. W.; and Clara M., who is the widow of C. A. Weatherford. Mr. Severance mourns the loss of his wife, who passed away May 10, 1904.)
  7. Mary Shepard married James McDuell
  8. Lucinda Shepard, married J. Z. Woodworth
  9. Melissa J Shepard Birth: 1851, Death: Dec. 10, 1870, age 19y 9m 15d Burial: Berg Cemetery Montgomery Hillsdale County Michigan, USA Plot: Section 4 Lot 69
  10. Unknown daughter

 

 

http://www.migenweb.org/hillsdale/bios/bios-s.html

http://books.google.com/books?id=yW5ntLrIIvoC&pg=PA653&lpg=PA653&dq=nancy+brown+shepard+canada+twin+%22new+york%22&source=bl&ots=kLBFbqAIZC&sig=UlEmxHOZD3OxZ-wR8Qx72dCT6OQ&hl=en&ei=bJSfTIjAKoeVnAec94ygDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CDIQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=nancy%20brown%20shepard%20canada%20twin%20%22new%20york%22&f=false

 

http://www.kieffernews.org/deaths/keeferohiodeath.html

 

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA115&lpg=PA82&dq=%22Benjamin%20P.%20Shepard%22%20Hillsdale&sig=en-PiBnxHLGU4L5vrT2krL5RDAA&ei=z1ujTKWRCIugsQOzhaH6Bg&ct=result&id=_Ld5AAAAMAAJ&ots=wUB4chslfs&output=text

 

History of Hillsdale County, Michigan, with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers:

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA115&lpg=PA115&dq=Nancy%20Brown%20and%20Israel%20Shepard&sig=jovu1iC7oGA5qmhg7x9d7b01nqY&ei=hVejTN2SJpGLnQfWhuW6Aw&ct=result&id=_Ld5AAAAMAAJ&ots=wUB4chqp8r&output=text

History of Huron County, Ohio:

Its progress and development, with biographical sketches of prominent citizens of the county, Volume 2

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA246&lpg=PA246&dq=Nancy%20Brown%20and%20Israel%20Shepard&sig=fYDlvFlChZphlZ-MQV8XURtBmbU&ei=R1WjTLS0PJHungeNyqnhAw&ct=result&id=bzwVAAAAYAAJ&ots=slTAcrG5KM&output=text

The Bunnell Family

 The Bunnell / Bonnell Family in America, Second Edition: William Bunnell of Massachusetts Bay and New Haven Colonies, Comprising Full Accounts of the First Six Generations

 

Lydia Bunnell

1647-1708

Indentured Servant

Lydia Bunnell

Elizabeth French

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Lydia Bunnell (William1  ) was born about 1647 in New Haven, CT. to William Bunnell and Ann Wilmot. She was christened/baptized in 1647 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.  On 10 Apr 1661 Lydia married Francis French, son of Capt. Capt. William French and Elizabeth Godfrey, in Milford, CT.  Lydia died on 1 Apr 1708 in Derby, CT.

 

Lydia was indentured to Samuel Whitehead when her father abandoned his family and returned to England. A great number of people were indentured servants, having pledged their service in return for a ticket to the American Colonies. Conditions in Europe improved after 1650, reducing the supply of indentured servants, while at the same time increased competition in the slave trade was lowering the price of slaves (See DeWolf family).In some sense the colonies’ early experience with indentured servants paved the way for the transition to slavery. Like slaves, indentured servants were not free, and ownership of their labor could be freely transferred from one owner to another. Unlike slaves, however, they could look forward to eventually becoming free.

Town records of Derby, Connecticut, 1665-1710:

aprel 25 1693 at a law town meeting a derby the town have granted to Lide French widow a peice of pasture land on of Treneh est side of her cank wood so called which she has fenced in.

 

The children of Lydia Bunnell and Francis French are:

 

  1. Lydia French (21 Aug 1662-7 Sep 1669)
  2. Elizabeth French (20 Jun 1664-18 Nov 1739) in Derby, CT
  3. Anna French (10 Aug 1666-Dec 169–)
  4. Mary French (7 Sep 1668-16 Jan 1688/9)
  5. Lydia French (28 Sep 1670-)
  6. Samuel French (Died young) (6 Jan 1672-26 Oct 1677)
  7. Susanna(h) French (6 Jun 1675-)
  8. Francis French (11 Feb 1677-11 Sep 1751)
  9. Jane French (18 Nov 1679-4 May 1750)

Keeping it in the family:

Benjamin Bunnell, brother to Lydia: Born abt.1642 in New Haven, CT. Benjamin was baptized in First Congregational Society, New Haven, in 1690.He was baptized as an adult. Benjamin died ca 1696 in New Haven, CT. Benjamin first married Rebecca Mallory, daughter of Peter Mallory (ca 1627-between 30 Aug 1697 and 24 Nov 1701) & Mary Preston (ca 1629-Dec 1690). Born on 18 Mar 1649[/50] in New Haven, CT. Rebecca died in New Haven, CT, on 12 Mar 1691; she was 40.

http://www.oxfordpast.net/oxf10.html

 

 

 

 

William Bunnell

Abt. 1610-1674

Wuss Immigrant Ancestor

(Went Home to England)

Farmer, Tanner, Mechanic and a

Burden to Society

William Bunnell

Lydia Bunnell

Elizabeth French

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

William Bunnell (1 ) was born Abt. 1600 in Cheshire, Eng, He married Anne Wilmot Abt. 1642 in New Haven, CT, daughter of Benjamin Wilmot and Anne Ladd. He died in 1674 in England.

 

William “Bonnel” (Bunnell) immigrated to America in 1638. He took the oath of fidelity in 1648 at New Haven, CT. He was a farmer and a Mechanic. He returned to England sometime after his wife Anne’s death in 1654.

 

Probably born about 1600 in Cheshire, England, William arrived in New England with the Winthrop Fleet of 1630. William Bunnell was in Massachusetts Bay Colony on 28 September 1630 for jury duty.

 

William and Anne Bonnell may have been among the very earliest settlers of New Haven CT. See the History of New Haven. William Bonnell, described by the Virkus reference as a “farmer and tanner”, married Anne Wilmot, in 1640 in New Haven CT. However, the Coate Dudick reference indicates that William and Anne were married in about 1635 in Wallingford CT (about 10 miles upriver from New Haven), but Wallingford was not settled until 1669. It is not known where Anne was born (most probably in Europe) and when and where she arrived. It might be supposed that Anne was also in the Puritan group which settled New Haven. However, it is also possible that she arrived on the ship Elizabeth and Ann to Boston in 1639, and subsequently moved to New Haven.

 

It was probably the same William Bunnell of the Massachusetts Bay Colony who, for unknown reasons, did not support himself or his family well and was a constant and frustrating burden on society.  In 1640 the General Court of the Colony asked the town of Watertown to provide William Bunnell a lot, and to fund the initiative if William could not.  In 1645 that same court appointed a committee to arrange disposition of Goodman Bunnell’s children, if their grandfather (Benjamin Wilmot) would not, and to dispose of certain goods to the benefit of Goodman Bunnell.

 

In May 1646 William Bunnell returned to England, apparently abandoning his wife and children, and the General Court agreed to pay for 30 shillings worth of clothing when he arrived there.  Ann (Wilmot) Bunnell moved to New Haven Colony to live with her parents, testifying years later that William “left little or nothing to maintain them” and telling her that the children were as much hers as his and, thus, that he was leaving them with her.  Because her father did not feel able and willing to support the additions to his family, one of the two boys, probably Benjamin, was indentured to Nicholas Elsy, and Lydia was indentured to Samuel Whitehead.

 

In 1649, if not before, William Bunnell returned to Massachusetts Bay Colony from England and followed his family to New Haven Colony, where he, apparently, was able to reconcile with his wife.  On 3 April 1650 the New Haven Court relieved William (“Goodman Bunill”) from having to pay his poll tax because he was poor, old, and weak.  The following month, May 1650, Ann (Wilmot) gave birth to Mary Bunnell, and in August 1650 William was fined for not reporting the birth, as prescribed by law.  A few months later, 7 January 1651, William’s landlord, sought help from the Court to evict William Bunnell for failure pay his rent.  Though an eviction arrangement was ordered, William did not comply, and the Court had to intercede again.  The matter was finally resolved without further Court action.

 

In October 1651 William asked the New Haven Court to terminate the indentures of his two children, but his request was denied, probably because nothing had changed with regards to William’s ability and/or willingness to support his family.  In fact, in the following months New Haven authorities agreed to provide William two shillings per week to help him support his family, and they considered what to do with William’s son who was still at home (probably Nathaniel), “who now for want of due nurture growes rude and offensive.”  Many felt this son should also be indentured away from William, and one townsman offered William a cow if he would release the boy to him for a number of years.  When William refused that offer, New Haven halted William’s weekly assistance.

 

William and Ann had a third son, Ebenezer, on 28 August 1653, but he died soon after, and New Haven authorities remained concerned with William’s household “both for the good of the children (who are not educated as they should) & for the easing ye Towne of charge.”  Ann died in February 1654, and on 1 May of that year William asked the Town of New Haven for help in returning himself to England, where he claimed to have friends.  Townsmen saw the long term benefits of supporting his request and passage was secured on a ship bound for England via Newfoundland.  Assuming William took that ship and arrived in England, he probably died there.

 

William’s children remained in New Haven.  Whether the two youngest were “put out” into indentured status, like their older siblings, is unknown.

 

Children of William Bunnell and Anne Wilmot are:

 

  1. Nathaniel Bonnell (abt. 1640-1711)
  2. Lydia Bunnell born about 1647 in New Haven, CT.  christened/baptized in 1647 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, m. 10 Apr 1661, Francis French, son of Capt. William French & Elizabeth Godfrey, in Milford, CT.  d. 1 Apr 1708 in Derby, CT.
  3. Benjamin Bunnell (abt. 1642-ca 1696)
  4. Mary Bunnell (4 May 1650-20 Jul 1724)
  5. Ebenezer Bunnell (Triplet)(Died soon) (28 Aug 1653-ca 1654)
  6. Eleazer BUNNELL –(Triplet) was born on 28 AUG 1653 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. He died in MAY 1654 at New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.
  7. Elizabeth BUNNELL (Triplet) born on 28 AUG 1653 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.

 

Elizabeth Butcher

Immigrant Ancestress

1625-Abt 1685

Elizabeth Butcher

John Perkins

Aaron Perkins

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Elizabeth Butcher (1 ) was born about 1625 in Warwickshire, England, married Edward Perkins 20 MAR 1649 in New Haven Colony, and died about 1685 at about age 60. It is unknown if she came with her family to the Colonies, but it is unlikely that she came to America alone.*

 

Life Expectancy in the Colonies
Average life expectancy was significantly higher in 17th-century New England than for either England or the Chesapeake region. Average life expectancy at 21 for colonists born in Andover was 64.2 for men and 61.6 for women. For their counterparts in Plymouth Colony, the ages were 69.2 for men and 62.4 for women. Figures were much lower for immigrants to the Chesapeake region. For people who arrived there in their 20s, average life expectancy for men was 48; for women, 39.

*Online source states:” There was an Elizabeth Butcher mar. Edward Perkins, (bap. 1625/6 in Brighton, England), on 20 Mar. 1649 in New Haven, Ct. He was son of Edward Pirkines. This Elizabeth was probably a daughter of one of Catheryn Butcher’s brothers, John or Roberte and therefore Catheryn’s niece, who mar. John Budd.  Butcher can be spelled “Butclier”.”

 

Children of Edward Perkins and Elizabeth Butcher:

 

  1.  John Perkins, born Aug. 18, 1651.
  2.  Mehitable Perkins, born Sept. 21, 1652.
  3.  Jonathan Perkins, born Nov. 12, 1653.
4.         David Perkins, born Oct. 3, 1656; Died: 27 OCT 1732 in New Haven, CT Spouses: Deliverance Bliss; Sarah Johnson


The Descendants of Edward Perkins of New Haven, Conn.

By Caroline Erickson Perkins, Perley Derby

http://www.archive.org/stream/descendantsofedw00inperk#page/n7/mode/2up

Sources:

  1. Title: warwickshire, EngRe: [Butcher] Time for a roll call?
    Author: RAMOS, Shirley
    Publication: http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/butcher/2001-03/0985026625
    Repository:
    Media: Electronic
  2. Title: “English Origin of Six Early Colonists by the Name of Perkins”
    Author: MORTENSEN, Paula Perkins
    Publication: © 1998 Paula Perkins Mortensen (Higginson reprint)
    Repository:
    Media: Book
    Text: b.c. 1622
  3. Title: “Descendants of ED Perkins New Haven Conn”
    Author: PERKINS, Caroline Erickson
    Publication: Rochester, NY: 1914\ http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/1063/\ http://www.heritagequestonline.com/prod/genealogy/fullcitation?docID=Genealogy-glh15509337
    Repository:
    Media: Book
  4. Title: “Families of Ancient New Haven” (9 vols)
    Author: JACOBUS, Donald Lines
    Publication: New Haven, 1922-32; Baltimore, 1974, 81
    Repository:
    Note: FTM CD 179
    Media: Book
  5. Title: “English Origin of Six Early Colonists by the Name of Perkins”
    Author: MORTENSEN, Paula Perkins
    Publication: © 1998 Paula Perkins Mortensen (Higginson reprint)
    Repository:
    Media: Book
    Text: m 1648/49

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scperkins/PerkinsDNA.html

 

Ursula Carter

1590-1666/67

Immigrant Ancestress

Ursula Carter

Henry Dillingham

Deborah Dillingham
Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Ursula (Drusilla) Carter (1 ) was born on 20 Jun 1590 in Kempston, Bedfordshire, England.  Ursula married Edward Dillingham at Cottesbach, Feb. 14, 1614.  Ursula died on 6 Feb 1655/56 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA and was buried on 9 Feb 1655/56 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA.

 

Several authorities have listed her as “Drusilla”. The original records are difficult to read.

Edward and Ursula, and three of their children came to Boston in 1632, settled in Lynn, and later in Sandwich, Massachusetts. Three daughters of Edward and Ursula remained in England.  Edward died between 1 May 1666 and 5 June 1667 at will & proved, Sandwich, Plymouth Colony.

17th Century Recipe:

Plague-water

(A cordial made with white wine & herbs)

Take a pound of Rue, of Rosemary, Sage, Sorrel, Celandine, Mugwort, of the tops of red Brambles, of Pimpernel, Wild-draggons, Arimony, Balm, Angelica, of each a pound. Put these Compounds in a pot, fill it with White-wine above the herbs, so let it stand four days. Then still it for your use in a Limbeck (The alembic (limbeck) is a kind of still that has been used since ancient times and continues to be used even today in the production of cognac.)

Children of Ursula Carter and Edward Dillingham are:

 

  1. Elizabeth Dillingham, b. Apr. 2, 1616 Cotesbach, England.  Married John Wing. D.Jan. 31, 1692. (She is mentioned in her grandfather Henry’s will, 1624.)\
  2. Marie Dillingham, b. Dec. 2, 1618 Cotesbach, England; Cotesbach, England died the same year.
  3. Oseth Dillingham, b. Feb. 10, 1622 Cotesbach, England, Cotesbach, England as “Osee”, Her name in the Sandwich records has been read as Oseah, but the parish register of Cottesbach gives the names of her aunt and grandmother as Oseth. It is likely she was named for them and should be Oseth.
  4. Henry Dillingham, b. Oct. 13, 1624 Cotesbach, England. m. Hannah Perry d. July 26, 1705 Sandwich Plymouth Colony
  5. Sarah Dillingham, b. June 23, 1627 Cotesbach, England; bur. Feb. 1, 1628.
  6. John Dillingham, b. May 1, 1629 Cotesbach, England; bur. May 9, 1629.
  7. John Dillingham, b. May 1, 1629 Cotesbach, England; m. Elizabeth Freake 24 March 1651, Snadwich, PC d. May 27, 1715, in Harwich, Mass. Rank: Lieutenant

 

Elizabeth Cleverly

Abt.1629-1681

Immigrant Ancestress

Young Love

Mother of Six Children

Elizabeth Cleverly

Joshua Hotchkiss

Stephen Hotchkiss

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Elizabeth Cleverly(1 ) is thought to have been born about 1629 in Essex, England, the daughter of John or Henry Cleverley. She married Samuel Hotchkiss 7 September 1642 and died in 1681 in New Haven, Connecticut. I can not find any adult Cleverlys in New Haven, but she was very young, and did not come to the Americas alone.

 

Some sources have her birth in 1622/3 (and one in 1624) however that would have made her twentyish on her wedding day. A major part of the flap about her “dalliance” with Samuel was that she was underage. I suspect the 1629 date to be closer to the truth, as that would have put her at age 13 or 14 when she had to be granted permission to marry.Regarding Samuel and Elizabeth’s public display, the following:

 

A COURT THE 7th OF SEPT. 1642, HELD ATT NEWHAVEN.

Samuell Hoskins and Elizabeth Cleverley, being desireous to joyne together in the state of marryage, and nott being able to make prooffe of their parents consent, butt seeing they both affirme they have the consent of their parents, and w’h all haveing entred into contract, sinfully and wickedly defiled each other w*h filthy dalliance and vnclcane passages, by wch they have both made themselves vnfitt for any other, and for wch they have both received publique correctio, vpon these considerations, granted them liberty to marry.

~ ~ ~

Life was hard in the colonies. Nights were cold, beds were in short supply, and settlements were far apart. Therefore, if a young man came a-calling, instead of his belle’s parents sending him home (through woods crawling with Native Americans eager to renegotiate unfavorable real estate deals with a hatchet or knife); requiring the couple to stay up all night and waste the family’s entire supply of firewood; or forcing the poor guy to sleep in the barn and die of hypothermia, they would tuck the young couple into bed together. Some sources insist the lovers were wrapped up like mummies and separated by a “bundling board”. A bundling board is a slab of wood placed upright in the center of a bed to prevent physical contact between two people sharing a bed. The practice of bundling members of the opposite sex sharing a bed while fully clothed has ancient roots but was most common in colonial America.

Bundling boards were generally made by hand to fit the bed they would be placed in. Some were permanently installed. Others were simply propped up in the center of the bed as a quick fix to an uncomfortable situation. A few beds had long slots to allow a bundling board to easily be added and removed as the situation warranted. Most bundling boards were quite tall to make climbing over them a difficult task.

The source of this particular custom is lost in the mists of history. While some writers maintain that it was Dutch immigrants in Hudson River Valley who first introduced bundling (or “queesting,” as it was known there) to America, others say that the custom was present from the time of the first colonies in New England.

Children of Samuel Hotchkiss and Elizabeth Cleverly are:

  1. 1.        John Hotchkiss, b. 1643; d. WFT Est. 1690-1735, New Haven, Connecticut. M. Elizabeth Peck
  2. 2.        Samuel Hotchkiss, b. 1645, New Haven, Connecticut; d. WFT Est. 1646-1735, Connecticut. M. (1)Sarah Talmadge (2) Hannah Thompson
  3. 3.        Sarah Hotchkiss, b. 1647, New Haven, Connecticut; d. WFT Est. 1675-1741, Connecticut; m. Jeremiah Johnson, WFT Est. 1675-1709, Connecticut.
  4. 4.        Joshua Hotchkiss, b. September 16, 1651, New Haven, Connecticut; d. December 22, 1722, New Haven, Connecticut. M (1) Mary Pardee (2)  Hannah Tuttle (3) Mary Ashbun
  5. 5.        Thomas Hotchkiss, b. August 31, 1654, New Haven, Connecticut; d. WFT Est. 1655-1744, Connecticut. M. Sarah Wilmot
  6. 6.        Daniel Hotchkiss, b. June 08, 1657, New Haven, Connecticut; d. WFT Est. 1658-1747, Connecticut. M. Esther Sperry

Christopher Cook

1562-1640

Immigrant Ancestor

Christopher Cook

Christopher Cook

Joanne Cook

Joanna Slocum

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Christopher Cook, son of Christopher Cooke and Margaret Garland was born 1562 in Thorne, Devonshire, England. He married Joane Coplestone (b. 1562, died in the year 1642 in England), daughter of Richard Copplestone and Alice Kellsey (or, Kelley) in about 1585 in Woodland, Devonshire, England. He died 1640 in Portsmouth, Newport , Rhode Island.

 

Portsmouth was settled in 1638 by a group of religious dissenters from Boston Colony. It is named after Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. It was founded by the signers of the Portsmouth Compact. Its original Indian name was Pocasset. It was officially named Portsmouth on May 12, 1639.

 

I do not know why Joane died in England. Perhaps she came to America with her husband, and returned to the Mother Country after his death, or refused to come at all.

 

Children of Christopher Cook and Joane Coplestone are:

  1. Christopher Cook, b. 1603, England, d. 1676, Portsmouth ,Newport , Rhode Island. m. Elizabeth Cooks

Christopher Cook

1603-1676

Immigrant Ancestor

Christopher Cook

Joanne Cook

Joanna Slocum

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Christopher Cook was born in 1603 in England, the son of Christopher Cook and Joane Coplestone. He married Elizabeth Cooks (b. 1604 in England, daughter of Edward Cooks and Jane Clements) in 1623 in England. Christopher died in 1676 in Portsmouth, Newport Co., Rhode Island.
     

Child of Christopher Cook and Elizabeth Cooks is:

 

  1. Joanne Cook (AKA Joan) born Abt. 1620; died 31 Aug 1679 in Portsmouth, Newport Co., Rhode Island; married Giles Slocum 1635 in Portsmouth, Newport Co., Rhode Island

Joanne Cook

1620-1679

Quaker

Joanne Cook

Joanna Slocum

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 
Joanne Cook (Christopher2, Christopher1) (Also known as Joan Cook) was born about 1620 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island. Her parentage is in dispute, but most agree that she is the daughter of Christopher Cook and Elizabeth Cooks. She married Giles Slocum about 1635*, and died 31 Aug 1679 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.

Religion:  16 AUG 1673 Excommunicated by the Baptist Church at Newport.  Became a Quaker along with her husband.

Quakers are individualists. How to praise, how to pray, and other worship details have always been left up to the individual. No Quaker will have any objection to using a particular book of prayers or of hymns.. Unprogrammed Meetings typically leave such decisions to the individual worshipper. This is in keeping with the Quaker belief that the greatest Teacher is within each person, that there is that of God in everyone.

Each family and each individual Quaker has their own traditions. Quakerism would never think of prescribing such details for them. Most Quakers believe that too rigid conformance to matters of observance tends to kill the Spirit rather than culture it. Note carefully that it is conformance that kills, not observance. Everyone is free to observe that which conscience shows to be helpful to spiritual progress.

 

17th Century Recipe

To make a Foole.

DESCRIPTION: A popular dish of cream, eggs, & wine

Slice a Manchet* very thin and lay it in the bottom of a dish, and wet them with Sack, boyle Creame, with Eggs, and three or foure blades of  Mace; season it with Rosewater and Sugar, stir it well together to prevent curdling; then pour it on the Bread and let it coole; then serve it up to the Table.

*Manchet, or manchette or michette (French), is a wheaten yeast bread of very good quality. These became the ‘ancestors’ of eighteenth century french bread.

Children of Joanne Cook and Giles Slocum are:

 

  1.  Joanna Slocumbe b. 16 Mar 1642 Old Cleeve, Somerset, England d. 6 Jan 1727 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island m. Jacob Mott
  2.  John Slocumbe b. 26 Mar 1645 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA d. 2 Feb 1702 Monmouth, Tennant, New Jersey,
  3. Giles Slocum b. 25 Mar 1647 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island d. 1 Jan 1713 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  4. Ebenezer Slocumb. 25 Jun 1650 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, d. 13 Feb 1715 Conanicut Island, Jamestown, Rhode Island, USA
  5. Nathaniel Slocum was born on 25 Dec 1652 in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island. He died on 31 Aug 1702 in Shrewsbury, New Jersey. Nathaniel Slocum married Hannah Tucker about 1685 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co. Massachusetts
  6. Peleg Slocumwas born on 17 Aug 1654 in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island. He died in 1731/1732 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co. Massachusetts. Peleg Slocum married Mary Holder in 1679/1680 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co. Massachusettes
  7. Samuel Slocum, born on 6 Apr 1657 in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island. He died in 1700 in Jamestown, Rhode Island.
  8. Mary Slocum  was born on 3 Jul 1660 in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island Usa. She died on 25 Sep 1689 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co. Massachusetts Usa and was buried in Dartmouth, Bristol Co. Massachusetts Usa. Mary Slocum married Abraham Tucker.
  9. Eliezer Slocum was born on 25 Oct 1664 in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island. He died on 30 Jul 1727 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co. Massachusetts. Eliezer Slocum married Elephell FitzGerald on 26 Nov 1687 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co. Massachusetts

 

* 1641 in some sources

Elizabeth Cooks

1604-1679

Immigrant Ancestress

Elizabeth Cooks

Joanne Cook

Joanna Slocum

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Elizabeth Cooks (1) (or, Cooke, Cook) was born in 1604 in England, the daughter of Edward Cooks and Jane Clements. She married Christopher Cook in 1623 in England. Elizabeth died in 1679 in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.

 

 

 17th Century Recipe

Apricocks Green

DESCRIPTION: A pie made of green apricots

To bake Apricocks green:

Take young green Apricocks, so tender that you may thrust a pin through the stone, scald and scrape the outside, oft putting them in water as you peel them till your Tart be ready, then dry and fill the Tart with them, and lay on good store of fine Sugar, close it, and bake it, scrape on Sugar, and serve it up: before you close it, cut your lid in branches, or works, that it may look somewhat open, and it will look the greener.

 

           Reproduction of a 17th Century Home

 

Child of Christopher Cook and Elizabeth Cooks is:

 

  1. Joanne Cook (AKA Joan) born Abt. 1620; died 31 Aug 1679 in Portsmouth, Newport Co., Rhode Island; married Giles Slocum 1635 in Portsmouth, Newport Co., Rhode Island

The Coopers

The surname Cooper is of occupative origin, derived, as were most of these very ancient names, from the occupation of an early ancestor and recorded as surnames after the coming of William the Conqueror had established the custom of the name. In the lists of those employed in the making of casks, tubs or “cups,” the name designated was Couper, Cupare, Cupper, Cowper, and various other forms of spelling. The Hundred Rolls, A. D. 1273, contain the names of Alan le Cupere of Cambridgeshire, Henry le Cupper of County Motts, and Richard le Cupare of Oxfordshire. Soon the Norman French “le” was dropped, and the name became greatly ramified in its native country. Later generations, assuming the modified form of the name, have spelled it Cooper.

John Cooper Sr.

1610 – 1689

Immigrant Ancestor

Founding Family of New Haven

Town Whiner and Cryer

 

John Cooper

John Cooper

Sarah Cooper

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

John Cooper (1) was born in England on July 22, 1610 in London, England, the son of Thomas (or Stephen) Cooper. John married his first wife, Mary Woolen (1614-1668), in England around 1635 and she was the mother of all of his children. Mary’s father was John Woolen, born in England around 1575. John married his second wife, Jane (Woolen) Hall, about 1679 in New Haven. She was the widow of John Hall of Wallingford, Connecticut. John Cooper died November 23, 1689, in New Haven, Connecticut. He and his first wife had four known children:

John Cooper came to Boston on June 26, 1637 on the Hector with several other founders of New Haven. John Cooper was one of the original 63 signers of the covenant of June 4, 1639, founding New Haven. His residence was on the west side of Church Street, at the corner of Grove Street in New Haven and was still living there in 1665.

In 1643 his household was comprised of three persons and an estate of 30 pounds which included nine acres of upland, 1 1/2 acres in the Neck and 3 acres of meadow, plus 12 acres upland from the second division. In the first division of land in 1641, he received 9 acres in the first division, 1 ¾ acres in the neck, and 3 acres in the meadow with 12 acres in the second division. His annual tax for this land was 6 shillings and 7 pence.

 

John is listed in attendance in the general court of July 1, 1644, as well as March 10, 1646. In the court of April 7, 1646 he was fined 6 pence for improper military equipment along with William Ives, James Bishop and several others.

John held a number of roles in the town. In 1643, he was appointed by the New Haven court as the first town chimney sweep. According to Levermore (The Republic of New Haven), every chimney in continual use had to be cleaned once a month in winter and once every other month in the summer. The cost of cleaning was related to the height of the chimney. If the owner wanted to do the job themselves, that was okay but then John inspected their work. If it was not done well then John re-did the job at double the regular fee. Also, every home owner, under five shilling fine, had to have a ladder leaning against the chimney at all times that provided access to any part of the roof and the chimney to provide access for fire prevention. After a few years John requested the town to name a successor in the chimney swipe role, since had several other town roles, but they could not find anyone. Finally, in 1658, the court declared that no one had to be the town chimney sweep.

In 1644 he was fined for coming late to a meeting with his arms, and again in 1647 for not having a gun rest.

John was also appointed the Town Crier in 1646 to proclaim the news. This role was eventually replaced by the newspaper. At the court of Oct. 26, 1646, he was chosen, along with Brother Mansfield, surveyor “for the other side of town.” In 1648 John Cooper was appointed “to begin to view and look to the fences presently, and when he gives warning to any quarter that he will view the first time, they are to go with him, show him every man his fence, and if they neglect, they shall pay 12 pence a man.” His role, supervising all the fence viewers was referred to as the “Public Pownder” because he and his two assistants would “overlook a convenient compase of ground on every day, and who should take and pound all the cattle and hogs they put there, mending any small defect in any fence or acquainting the owner with any breach.”

Later that same year John Cooper informed the court that “there is a great deal of fence down about Mr. Evans farm…the court ordered that it be made up with speed.” He also sited others for down fences. The next year John was “advised to view all the fences well, and where he sees them failing and not likely to keep cattle out of the corn, that he warn the owner of them and if they be not mended sufficiently between this and the next court, that they be warned to answer it.” He was also ordered to drive the neck and to “pound those cattle which are not orderly put in.” John also requested that the court appoint a man in each quarter “to know the quantity of corn every man hath sowen or planted this year, that he is to be paid for.”

At the court of Nov. 6, 1649 John Cooper complained that Thomas Osborne let his four of hogs “go abroad in the summer for the most part, contrary to order. Thomas Osborne could not deny it. The court ordered that he pay to John Cooper 12 pence a hog.” At the same court, John Cooper also complained that David Atwater and William Wooden let their hogs abroad in the summer contrary to order and that they have not been ringed, according to the last order. “The court witnessed against their disorderly walking, and they are to pay John Cooper for each swine which he found abroads of theirs, 12 pence, and for each swine not ringed and marked according to order.”

In 1652 John Cooper appealed the verdict of a Southampton jury regarding a bill which was not authentic. In court again in 1655, he was found to have “unjustly molested, grieved, & dissparaged” Jonas Wood, for which he was ordered to pay 40 pounds. In 1659 he was fined 5 shillings for excessive drinking. In 1664 John Scott charged him with “high treason”. He was commissioned as Corporal of the New Haven train band during unrest between the Dutch & the English, but he never saw action.

Levermore writes that one winter John Cooper summoned a large portion of the town for defective fences. So many influential townspeople were accused that the court, while complimenting John for his work, wiped out all the fines and gave every one a clean slate. John informed the court of June 11, 1666 that the corner in the beaver field was in danger of spoiling by hogs with the dam broken and requested the liberty of five or six men to go and make up the fence there and this granted to him.

John was also involved in a number of estates. He was the overseer of the estate of William Bassett with Abraham Dickerman in his will of Jan. 1, 1679. He took the inventory of the estates of: Joseph Dickenson with Samuel Hemingway on May 10, 1683, Joseph Potter with Thomas Yale on Aug. 17, 1669, Thomas Powell with Abraham Dickerman on Oct. 10, 1681, Elizabeth Rose (widow) with John Winston on Aug. 2, 1677, John Rose, Sr. with Samuel Hemingway on May 10, 1683, John Harriman, Sr. on Dec. 6, 1681 with Abraham Dickerman, Widow Hitchcock on June 5, 1685 with John Winston, Sr, Thomas Hogge on June 5, 1685 with Thomas Kimberly, Andrew Low on Feb. 12, 1670 with William Bradley, William Luddington (no date) with Matthew Moulthrope, Richard Miles on Dec. 28, 1666 with Roger Alling, Elizabeth Morris (widow) on Nov. 8, 1681 with Jeremiah How, Matthew Moulthrope on Dec. 1668 with William Andrews, Francis Newman on Jan. 8, 1660/1 with Richard Miles and John Wakeman, William Osbornoe on April 29, 1662 with Richard Miles, George Smith on Dec. 20 with Roger Alling, Benjamin Stabbe on April 30, 1678 with Henry Glover and Thomas Trowbridge, John Thomas, Sr. on Jan. 4, 1669 with Roger Alling, John Tuttle, Sr. on Sept. 12, 1683 with John Winston, Sr. He also witnessed the will of Christopher Tod on March 25, 1686 with Abraham Dickerman.

On Sept. 6, 1664 he presented the inventory of the estate of John and Elinor Vinton. The court was concerned for the welfare of their children, also John and Elinor. The court asked who they would like to be guardian or overseers of their estate. They requested John Cooper and Thomas Yale and the court approved it. Then the court concerned the disposition of the children, now orphans. The court received a letter from Purchase Clarke, who was at the ironworks in Lynn, MA that was read and kept on file. It said he had much affection for the children and that they formerly lived in Lynn and had other fiends there. He promised to take care of them and see that they were disposed of for their good. John Cooper said to the court that Purchase was an able man and of good repute for godliness. The court approved that the children be sent to Purchase and ordered to Thomas Yale and John Cooper to see that the children were comfortably provided for the voyage there. The record said that later word was received by Patrick, formerly servant to Purchase that they children were lovingly received by Purchase and well disposed for their good.

On June 23, 1654, he was appointed corporal of a military company then organized for a contemplated expedition against the Dutch on the Hudson, and served as deputy for New Haven to the Colony’s General court, May and August, 1661; May and November, 1662. John was representative to the Connecticut General court in April and October, 1665; October, 1666; May, 1671; October, 1674, and May, 1675. He was judge of the New Haven Town court in 1661, and a member of the committee to settle disputes between the town and individuals. The court of Nov. 11, 1667 appointed John Cooper, along with James Bishop, John Nash, and John Morse to meet with men from Branford and settle the boundary dispute and appointed again to a committee for the same purpose in April 26, 1669. An agreement was reached and read at the December 6, 1669 town meeting.

This same 1667 court appointed John Cooper and a number of others to act as attorneys for the town to make sure the covenants for grinding at the mill were properly upheld as there had been complaints. In February 1668 he was appointed to a committee, along with James Bishop, to settle the boundary dispute with Milford. In the court of March 1, 1669/70, he served on a jury in a dispute between William Chatterton, plaintiff, and Grace Mattocke, defendant.

In April 26, 1669 he has selected as a townsman (selectman) for the year, along with Abraham Dickerman and they were reappointed on June 26, 1671, April 27, 1695, and April 1677; John was chosen again in April 26, 1681. At the 1671 meeting, John Cooper presented a proposition form the widow Browne they a cart lot be built through her land. There was discussion about whether the neighbors should maintain it and nothing was concluded at the meeting. At this same meeting John Cooper informed the town that he and Moses Mansfield had viewed the land that John Nash wanted to fence in by the Mill River and they saw no inconvience to the town if he did this as long as there was access to cut hedge there on occasion. The town then granted John Nash this right to build a fence around his land as long as there was the access that John Cooper mentioned. At this meeting John also requested the town grant him a piece of land near Stony Rover farms in exchange for his second division grant. The town appointed Moses Mansfield and Matthew Moulthrop to look into the situation and make a return to the town.

Later, at the December 1674 town meeting, John stated that the land he was granted toward Stony River was not available for him because of the way Captain Clark laid out his land. He requested liberty to take land up toward Solitary Cove instead. The town again appointed Moses Mansfield and Matthew Moulthrop to look into the situation and to make sure there was sufficient highways and passages to the woods and meadows.

In 1673 he dissented from an agreement on the boundaries of New Haven in regard to the meadow. He signed with his mark, “JC”.

At the April 1677 town meeting it was reported that John and Captain Rosewell had laid out a highway from the ferry to the farms at the ironworks. John Cooper was also interested in the iron works at East Haven, and removed to Stony River about the time the iron works was established there. He received 50 acres of land in the third division of land in 1680. John was listed as a Proprietor of New Haven in 1685.

This is what the court records of the day looked like”

[221] A Generall Court The 30th Of October, 1648.

John Cooppr was desired to acquaints the court wheither ho be willing to be a generall pounder for the towne. He answered yea, so that the towne would sett him in a way what to doe <fe how he might be payde. He was desired to acquaints the court what he desired, he sd iff he made it his whole imployment he could not doe it vnder 301 a yeare, but the court thought not meete to laye forth so much yearly vpon this worke, therfore it was propounded that he might spend two dayes in a weeke to view all ye fences, & pound catle & swine, & that for his paye he might have 2d vpon every acr of land that is improved for corne w’hin y° two mile, and that he gitts for pounding catle beside, wch was propounded to Jn° Coppr and he accepted it. Whervpon the court ordered that for y« yeare to come John* Coppr be publique pownder for ye towne, to be vnder oath to view the fences aboute the corne feilds belonging to ye towne w’hin the two mile, one every weeke, if no extraordinary providenc hinder. The time for his view is left to himselfe, so as maye be most for ye benifite of the severall quarters, and to tell every man whose fenc is defective one every weeke, but if any man hath had warning of his fenc to be defective, & it is not mended before the next weeke he view againo, (their being a weekes time betwixt his view,) the fine to bo 12d for every post & length of rayles that is defect ive or downe, & 6d a time for Jn° Coopprs comeing to tell them, and if yet it be neglected it is counted a contempt and they must answer it at the court; and what damadge comes by it to be pd by ye owner of the fenc beside. And for his paye the court ordered & he accepted, that he have 2d for every acr of land w’hin the two mile that is improved for corne, house lotts or other, and what swine or catle he poxinds according to order, to have the poundage beside, wch is ordered to be 4d a beast as ox, steere, cow or calfe, & 12d a horse, & for swine according to the order following; and thoughe the swine or catle of any sort wch transgrese the order be not pownded, but the owner told of them, they must paye as if they were pounded.

Children of John Cooper and Mary Woolen are:

1. Mary Cooper born was born in 1636 in England, baptized on August 15, 1641, and died in New Haven on January 4, 1705, married Abraham Dickerman (1634-1711) on Dec. 2, 1658 in New Haven. They had eight children: Mary (1659-1728), Sarah (1661), Hannah (1665-1708), Ruth (1668-1725), Abigail (1670-1751), Abraham (1673-1758), Issac (1677-1758), Rebeccah (1679-1757). All were born in New Haven.

2. Hannah Cooper born 1638 in New Haven, CT, baptized in New Haven Colony on August 15, 1641, and died on June 15, 1675. She married John Potter (1635-1711) in 1661 in New Haven. They had nine children: Hannah (1661-1662), John (1663-1664), Hannah (1665), John (1667-1713), Samuel (1669-1669), Samuel (1670-1671), Samuel (1671-72), Samuel (1675-1737). All were born in New Haven.

3. John Cooper was born in New Haven Colony on May 28, 1642, and died in 1703. He married Mary Thompson (1652-1714) on Dec. 27, 1666 in New Haven. They had nine children: Mary (1669-1670), John (1670-1693), Sarah (1673-1736), Samuel (1675-1762), Mary (1677-1761), Hannah (1681-1772), Joseph (1683-1747), Rebecca (1689-1770). All were born in New Haven.

4. Sarah Cooper born before Sept, 21, 1645 and baptized on that date in New Haven, CT, married Samuel Hemmingway (1636-1689) on Mar. 23, 1661 in New Haven. They had ten children: Sarah (1663-1725), Samuel (1665-1666), Mary (1668-1691), Abigail (twin 1672-1737), Elizabeth (twin 1672-1685), John (1675-1736), Hannah (1676-1740), Jacob (twin 1683-1754), Issac (twin 1683-1685). Elizabeth (1685). All were born in New Haven.

http://billives.typepad.com/ives_family_history_blog/cooper_bios/

John Cooper Jr.

1642-1703

Proprietor of New Haven

John Cooper

Sarah Cooper

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John Cooper (John1) was born 28 May 1642 in New Haven, Connecticut. He was baptized on May 28, 1642 at the First Congregational Church. John was the son of John Cooper and Mary Woolen. He married Mary Thompson (1652-1714), widow of Samuel Lines, on Dec. 27, 1666 in New Haven, CT. died in 1703 in New Haven, CT and is buried there.

The town meeting of Feb. 7, 1670 appointed him as pounder (fence viewer) for the little quarter toward the hill. He was appointed constable at the September 18, 1676 meeting after getting equal votes as John Morris but there were some disagreements on the decision and responsibilities. John Cooper refused and presented reasons for this that were not accepted and he had to pay a forty shilling fine for not serving. At the March 13, 1676/77 meeting he was appointed surveyor of the highways for the coming year. He received 37 ½ acres of land in the third division of land in 1680. He is listed as a Proprietor of New Haven, CT, in 1685.End Notes

The children of John Cooper and Mary Thompson are:

  1. Mary Cooper, born Nov.15, 1669 in New Haven, died 1670 in New Haven.
  2. John Cooper, born Feb. 23, 1670 in New Haven, died 1693 in New Haven, married Sarah Thomas (1672-1757) on Jan. 4, 1693. They had six children: Elizabeth (1695-1776), John (1699-1724), Mary (1701-1726), Thomas (1703-1784), Caleb (1708-1746), Jude (1714-1781). All were born in New Haven.
  3. Sarah Cooper, born Apr. 26, 1673 in New Haven, died 1736 in New Haven, married John Munson (1672-1749) on Nov. 10, 1692 in New Haven. They had nine children: John (1702-1775), Elizabeth (1693-1746), Hannah 1697), Joel (1702-1775), Anne (1704), Amy (1704-1790), Ruth (1707-1785), Mehitable (1709-1779), Sarah (1713-1737). All were born in New Haven.
  4. Samuel Cooper, born June 20, 1675 in New Haven, died 1762 in New Haven, married Elizabeth Smith (1676-after 1719) on Nov. 15, 1699 in New Haven. Elizabeth was the sister of Abigail Smith who married Samuel’s brother Joseph. Samuel and Elizabeth had nine children: Mabel (1700-1777), Timothy (1702-1725), Samuel (1704-1781), Issac (1707), Desire (1709), Obedience (1712-1771), Joel (1715), Sarah (1716-1778), Abraham (1719). All were born in New Haven. Abraham served in the French and Indian War in 1760 in the Sixth Company from New Haven under Capt. Hitchcock. After Anna died Samuel married Sarah Pardee (1695-1749), the widow of John Thompson.
  5. Mary Cooper, born Sep. 11, 1677 in New Haven, died on 1761 in New Haven, married Samuel Smith (1678-1753) on Aug. 14, 1700. They had nine children: Lamberton (1701-1779), Obedience (1705), Mary (1707-1788), Amy (1709), Margaret (1711-1803), Desire (twin 1712-.1799), Thankful (twin 1712-1769), Obedience (1714), Amy (1720-1796). All were born in New Haven.
  6. Abigail Cooper, born Oct.3, 1679 in New Haven, died on 1724 in New Haven, married Issac Johnson (1672-1750) on April 25, 1699. They had ten children, all born in New Haven: Rebecca (1700-1723), Eunice (1703-1725), Issac (1705-1758), Dorcas (1707-1723), Abigail (1709-1748), Ezra (1712-1753), Obed (1714-1760), Rachel (1716-), Lois (1719-1750), David (1721-1758).
  7. Hannah Cooper, born Aug. 10, 1681 in New Haven, died on 1772 in Woodbridge, CT, married John Lines (1676-1718) on De. 27, 1700 in New Haven. They had six children: (Ruth (1701-1788), Mary (1703-1790), Helena (1706-1736), Samuel (1708-1735), Daniel (1712-1793), Keiza (1715-1782). All were born in New Haven.
  8. Joseph Cooper, born Sep. 11, 1683 in New Haven, died on 1747 in New Haven. He married Abigail Smith, they had nine children, all born in New Haven: Phebe (1707-1750), Lydia Cooper (1708-1790), Joseph (1710-1761), Stephen (1712-1791), Joel (1717-1722), Abigail (1719-after 1746), Thankful (1721-1808), Joel (1723-1808), Mary (1725-1789). (see above)
  9. Rebecca Cooper born 1689 in New Haven, died on 1770 in New Haven, married Daniel Alling (1688-1756), they had eight children: Timothy (1712-1772), Mabel (1714-1737), Rebecca (1716-1802), Esther (1720), Sarah (1722), Phebe (1724-1788), Daniel (1728-1821), Silas (1734-1817). All were born in New Haven.

 

Sarah Cooper

1673-1736

Mother of Nine Children

Sarah Cooper

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Sarah Cooper (John2,John1) was born 26 Apr 1673, New Haven, Connecticut. She was the daughter of John Cooper and Mary Thompson. Sarah married John Munson on Nov. 10, 1692, in New Haven Colony and died in 1736 in New Haven, Connecticut, at age 62. She was buried at the Center Church on the Green Churchyard; no headstone remains.

 

  Stained Glass Window in the Center Church on the Green

             w/Reverend Davenport

On that first Sabbath on April 25, 1638, the Puritan settlers gathered beneath an oak tree (near where today is the corner of College and George Streets).

The Reverend John Davenport preached on the text “Then Jesus was led up of the Spirit into the wilderness”, and it was believed that in the midst of the Long Island Sound wilderness, they were forming a new Jerusalem.

Children of Sarah Cooper and John Munson are:

 

  1. John Munson, Jr.; b. 7 Jul 1693 in New Haven, Connecticut. d. 1745 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
  2. Elizabeth Munson was born on 15 May 1695 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died after 1765.
  3. Hannah Munson was born on 9 Feb 1696/1697 in New Haven, Connecticut
  4. Joel Munson was born on 18 Aug 1702. He died in 1775 in (prob.) Hamden, Connecticut
  5. Anne Munson was born on 18 Sep 1704 in New Haven, Connecticut.
  6. Amy Munson was born on 18 Sep 1704 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died after 1790 in Woodbridge, Connecticut.
  7. Ruth Munson was born on 30 Jan 1706/1707 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died on 21 May 1785.
  1. Mehitable Munson was born on 17 Oct 1709 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died on 26 Feb 1779 in New Haven, Connecticut.
  2. Sarah Munson was born on 27 Sep 1713 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died in Cheshire, Connecticut.

Sarah Crowell

Abt. 1592-1659

Mother of Eleven

Sarah Crowell

Hannah Perry

Deborah Dillingham
Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Sarah Crowell (Crowe) was born about 1592 in County Devonshire, England daughter of John Crowell and Elishua [Unknown] Sarah married Edmund Perry in 1613 in (prob.), Bridford, Devonshire, England. She died on 8 Jun 1659 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts and was buried in 1659 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts.

< 17th Century New England Village

 

Most researchers indicate that all her children were born in Devonshire between 1613 and 1634. Some researchers have Edmund’s death at 1636 (age 49) in Plymouth, Mass. An alternate story is that Edmund died in England about 1636 and his widow Sarah Crowell Perry, brought five of their youngest children to America including Ezra, Edward, Margaret, Deborah and probably Anthony. That would take a strong woman to come to America so early in our countrys development. They settled in Sandwich, Massachusetts in the Plymoth colony on Cape Cod. Sarah was a Quaker and came from Bridford, Devonshire, England. Some researchers have reported that Ezra Edward, Margaret, Deborah and Anthony were born in Massachusetts. If their births were in America it would argue for Edmund and Sarah coming to America in about 1624 and having five more children with Edmund dying in 1636.

Children of Edmund Perry and Sarah Crowell are:

  1. Arthur Perry, tailor, born 1615; died in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, 9 October 1652; married in 1636, Elizabeth Crowell, daughter of John and Elishua (Yelverton) Crowell, born about 1625; died in Boston, 22 February 1698. Arthur was town drummer; one of the original members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company (1638); freeman (13 May 1640). By wife Elizabeth he had Elishua (1637), Seth (1639), John (1642), Elizabeth (1647), Sarah (1647), and Deborah (1649). See Savage, 3:399.
  2. John Perry, born in Devon, England, 1616; died 21 September 1642 (Stafford, CServe message, 21 April 1997). Note, however, that there was a John Perry rated as able to bear arms in Taunton in 1643 (NEHGR 4:259) and a John Perry who died in Watertown in 1674, age 61 (NEHGR 38:73).
  3. William Perry, born 1620; died about 1693; married Susanna Carver, daughter of Richard and Grace Carver. Appears to have been a resident of Scituate from 1637 and of Marshfield from 1657. A recurrent error has this William and/or Thomas Perry married to Sarah Stedman, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Stedman. However, as shown by Robert S. Wakefield in “The Family of Isaac Stedman of Scituate and Muddy River, Massachusetts,” TAG (July 1994), pp. 155-159, this Sarah actually married Samuel Perry, son of John and Anne (Newman) Perry. Susanna Carver emigrated with her parents from Norfolk County, England, to Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1637.
  4. Elizabeth Perry, born about 1622; married John Hanchett.
  5. Margaret Perry, born in Devon, 1623; died in Sandwich, 5 November 1688; married Edmond Freeman, 18 July 1651. Edmond Freeman was Deputy to the General Court for Sandwich (1666-1673) and Assistant to the Governor, 1666-1686 and 1689-1691.
  6. Anthony Perry born in Devon, 1625; died in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, 1 March 1683; married Elizabeth Perry in 1646. Grand Juryman, May 1654; on a committee to buy Joseph Peck’s house to make it fit for the ministry, 2 November 1663; constable for Rehoboth, 1665 (Peirce’s Colonial Lists. Civil, Military and Professional Lists of Plymouth and Rhode Island Colonies); received one share of the land granted to Rehoboth by Plymouth Colony Court on 10 April 1666 (Bowen, Early Rehoboth, VI, 40-41); on a committee to finish the meeting house (1678) and then to sell it (1680); Deputy to the Court, 1673; Surveyor of Highways for Rehoboth, 1679 (Pierce’s Colonial List); Townsman, 8 May 1680. Representative to the General Court in Boston; made a donation of £14 2d to “Phillips War.”
  7. Ezra Perry born in Devon, England, 1627; died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts, 16 October 1689, the day he made his will; married in Sandwich, 12 February 1652, Elizabeth Burgess
  8. Edward Perry born in Devon, 1630; died in Sandwich, 16 February 1695; married Mary Freeman (1631-1695). Progenitor of Naval heroes – Captain Oliver Hazard Perry, Commodore Matthew Perry, and others.
  9. 9.        Hannah Perry born 1632; died in Sandwich, 9 June 1673; married Henry Dillingham, 24 June 1652. Hannah and her husband are supposed to have become Quakers.
  10. Margaret Perry born in Devon, 1623; died in Sandwich, 5 November 1688; married Edmond Freeman, 18 July 1651. Edmond Freeman was Deputy to the General Court for Sandwich (1666-1673) and Assistant to the Governor, 1666-1686 and 1689-1691.
  11. Deborah Perry born in Devon, 28 November 1634; died in Sandwich, 14 October 1665; married Robert Harper, 9 May 1654, in Sandwich.

Phoebe Dayton

    – Abt.1720

Mother of Eight

Phoebe Dayton

Thomas Beardsley

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Phoebe Dayton married Joseph Beardsley in 1665 in Brookhaven, Long Island, New Yorkand died Aft. 1680 in Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut. Some records have her first name as Elizabeth, some as Abigail. I picked Phoebe because I like that name! Perhaps at some future date, someone will have better information. There are so many different records of her birthdate and birthplace, I choose to do without.

.

Long Island Life circa 1665

A few Indians roamed the Neck seeking deer, bear, partridges, or quail, fishing in the creeks, digging in the bay for clams that served a two-fold purpose: the meat for food and the shells as a medium of exchange. By 1650 there were not many white families in this little wilderness.

Life on Long Island must have been much the same as in other American colonies. Economically, it was a farming-pastoral, home-industry community; it was governed by the Town Meeting with the blessings of the Crown; socially, life centered in the church and the taverns.

Course clothing was made on the old spinning wheel and shoes were cut from crudely tanned hides of the farm cattle. Food was grown in the garden patch, hooked from the waters of Parsonage or Milburn Creek, dug from the shallows of the Bay, hunted against the fall skies above the marshes or along the woodland trails. Wood was the tableware of the common folk, supplemented by copper or iron cooking pots and pans. Evenings were short. Eight o’clock found everyone in bed – in winter, in the company of the warming pan!

Politics, education and religion were closely entwined in the colonial Long Island structure. Church attendance was compulsory; absence was punished by fine, or by banishment for the habitual offender.

Children of Phoebe Dayton and Joseph Beardsley are:

 

  1. Joseph Beardsley, born 10 June 1666 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 1745 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT
  2. Jonathan Curtis Beardsley, born 01 November 1668; died in Connecticut.
  3. Hannah Beardsley, born 30 April 1670 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died in Connecticut; married Thomas Harvey
  4. Elizabeth Beardsley, born 1672 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died Abt. 1772 in Ridgefield, CT; married (1) Edmund Prilford; married (2) Abraham Pullin.
  5. 5.        Thomas Beardsley, born May 1674 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 28 September 1773 in Huntington, CT; married Sarah Dimic.
  6. Ephraim Beardsley, born 1677 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 1733 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT.
  7. John Beardsley, born 1681; died 29 November 1735 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT.
  8. Josiah Beardsley, born 1681 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 1769 in Connecticut.

The Denmans

John Denman

 Abt. 1621-1691

Immigrant Ancestor

 

John Denman

Philip Denman

Sarah Dimic

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John Denman was born in Retford, Nottinghamshire, England 16 January 1620/21 to John Denman and Judith Stoughton. He married Unknown (possibly Mary) abt. 1640/42 in Salem Colony, MA or South Hampton, LI, New Netherlands. He died 1691.

 

The name Denman originated from a term given them by the English, who called them "Dane men" because they came from Denmark. The original Denmans in America trace their ancestry back to the year 1620, at which time John Denman and Judith Stoughton, of England, were married. The son of this worthy couple, by name John, on 30 September 1635 left London, England, and embarked on the Dorset, (Mr John Flower, Master) bound for Bermuda at age 14, with his (again) widowed mother, his sister Mary, and half brother William Smead. Later, William was “lost amoung the Indians”. Their final destination was Boston, where his uncles, Israel and Thomas Stoughton, (brothers of Judith), resided. The Stoughtons were much involved the the founding of Harvard College. ( Further research: Stoughton Hall)  They had to pretend to be headed to the West Indies, as by that time, England was wary of so many people immigrating to America. John Denman of Dorchester, Massachusetts, was the original progenitor of the Denman family in America and was the father of three sons, John, Philip and William. 

 

Children of John Denman and (possibly) Mary are:

1.        John Denman;  Born: abt. 1643 at:  Salem Colony, Essex Co., MA   Died:  Dec. 1713  at:  Newtown, Queens Co., Long Island, NY Spouse: MARY GANO/ Mary Gannaugh, of Long   Island, and they had three daughters and four sons, namely: Martha, Mary and Elizabeth, and William, Philip, Thomas and John III
2.        Philip Denman; Born:  abt. 1644/46 at: New Haven, CT  Died: at:  Derby, New Haven Co., CT Spouse:  Hasadjab Slough. 
3.        William Denman

http://www.archive.org/stream/denmanfamilyhist00harr#page/1/mode/1up
 

Philip Denman

1644-1698

Philip Denman

John Denman

Sarah Dimic

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Philip (John1) son of John Denman and (possibly) Mary, was born about 1644/46 at: New Haven, CT. Phillip married Hasadiah Slough, (“Miss Hasadink”) (daughter of William Slough and Elizabeth Prudden) between 1676 and 1695. He died in 1698 in Derby, New Haven Co., CT

They lived in Derby, Ct, where Philip was frequently mentoned as a “free-holder” (land owner).  In 1681 he owned five tracts of land.  On 1 Oct. 1683, he and Francis French took an inventory of the estate of John Jackson, of New Haven, CT.  Philip’s will was dated 20 Aug. 1698.

 

Derby was settled in 1642 as an Indian trading post under the name Paugasset. It was named after Derby, England in 1675.

 

Children of Philip Denman and Hasadiah Slough are:

 

  1. Mary Denman, b. in Apr. 1678.
  2. Elizabeth Denman, was b. in July 1680 in Derby, New Haven Co., CT.  On 27 Dec. 1704 she married Zachariah Blackman (or Blakeman),of Stratford. Elizabeth died 23 Mar. 1731/32.
  3. Sarah Denman, was b. 15 Sept. 1682.  On 18 Dec. 1707 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT, she married Thomas Beardsley.
  4. Micah Denman, had no birth or baptismal record and was b. abt.1684.  Micah’s will, dated 5 Feb. 1763 and proved in May 1769, named his nephew, John Coe, of Derby, as his heir.
  5. Unknown Son b. Feb. 11, 1685
  6. Hamish (Some records have Hannah) Denman b. 1698

 

The DeWolfs

Wherever they came from, The DeWolfs kept a love of adventure and of the sea, and were inveterately independent and stubborn.

The family of de Wolf, one of the most ancient in Rhode Island, is of ancient New England lineage, and has been especially identified with shipping and commerce. Long before the revolution the de Wolfs were traders with the West Indies and in the carrying trade to various parts of the world. By alliance with many of the oldest and proudest New England families it has bequeathed to its representatives the best blood of the nation throughout the generations. The name is unquestionably of French origin, and the characteristics of the Huguenot ancestors are found conspicuously represented in the descendants of the present day.

A Baron DeWolf was chosen 1517 tcommissioner of the House of Saxe to settle boundaries of various principalities of the Imperial Diet, an ability Balthasar and two of his sons including Edward apparently inherited. Joseph DeWolf became Admiral in the Dutch Service and then Governor of the Dutch East Indies.  (Supporting this claim would be evidence he had a son named Balthasar b abt 1620, who cannot be otherwise accounted for.)  The way Esther has it worded, it sounds as if he went to England and served in Parliament? and had a son Sir Drummond DeWolf, member of Parliament, Envoy Extraordinary, Minister Pleipotenentiary to Turkey, and High Commissioner to Egypt.

Joseph Henry DeWolf was son of Maximilian DeWolf. B. est 1557-1600 d est 1598- (dates from FTM) married est. 1581-1638.  He son of Frederick DeWolf, Maximilian Baron of the 
Holy Roman Empire,  who had lands conferred upon him by Emperor Charles the fifth and took up residence in Belgium in 1535.  His oldest son was Baron Charles de Wolf.  Frederick DeWolf was the son of Emile DeLoup.  b est 1409-1486 d est 1445-1561. He was the son of Louis De Saint Etienne.  Grandson of Louis de Saint Etienne had the title of Baron conferred upon him in 1427 by the Duke of Saxony, changed his name from French to German "DeWolf".  His chldren were Frederick and Francis.

According toWorld Family Tree, Louis de Saint Etienne saved the life of Charles V of France while hunting from an attacking she-wolf, and he was knighted Sir Louis de Loup (Wolf) WFT CD #6 has this pedigree. Etienneis French for Stephen, and an old city in south-central part of France. The story goes, Louis De Saint Etienne, of the French noble family of that name, was one of King Charles the fifth’s attendants on a hunting expedition. During the chase, a wolf cub crossed the King’s path; Charles threw his lance at the cub, mortally wounding it, and breaking the weapon against a tree. An enormous she-wolf, seeing her cub wounded, rushed from the forest, pouncing upon the King, who had nothing but a hunting knife with which to defend himself. Louis De Saint etienne rushed between the wolf and the King and dispatched it with his sword, thus saving the King’s life. As a reward, the King Knighted Louis, who from that time on was called De Loup (The Wolf), and was ancestor of the noble French family of that name. “Burke’s Complete Armory” gives the DeWolf coat of arms, showing that the family had been for many years an English family. The DeWolf motto is Vincit qui Patitur…he who is patient, wins.

"In Traces of the Trade”, a movie about persons in our family tree, Producer/Director Katrina Browne tells the story of her forefathers, the largest slave--trading family in U.S. history. Given the myth that the South is solely responsible for slavery, viewers will be surprised to learn that Browne's ancestors were Northerners. The film follows Browne and nine fellow family members on a remarkable journey which brings them  face-to-face with the history and legacy of New England's hidden enterprise.

"From 1769 to 1820, DeWolf fathers, sons and grandsons trafficked in human beings. They sailed their ships from Bristol, Rhode Island to West Africa with  rum to trade for African men, women and children. Captives were taken to plantations that the DeWolfs owned in Cuba or were sold at auction in such ports as Havana and Charleston. Sugar and molasses were then brought 
from Cuba to the family-owned rum distilleries in Bristol. Over the generations, the family owned 47 ships that transported thousands of Africans across the Middle  Passage into slavery. They amassed an enormous fortune. By the end of his life, James DeWolf had been a U.S. Senator and was the second richest man in the United States.

"The enslavement of Africans was business for more than just the DeWolf family. It was a cornerstone of Northern commercial life. The Triangle Trade drove the economy of many port cities (Rhode Island had the largest share in the trade of any state), and slavery itself existed in the North for over 200 years. Northern textile mills used slave-picked cotton from the South to fuel the Industrial Revolution, while banks and insurance companies played a key role throughout the period. The DeWolf family story is a quintessential representation of this multi-faceted New England story. 

While they were one of only a few "slaving" families, the network of commercial activities that they were tied into involved an enormous portion of the Northern population. Many citizens, for example, would buy shares in slave ships in order to make a profit.

"The film follows ten DeWolf descendants (ages 32-71, ranging from sisters to seventh cousins) on a journey that is both literal and existential. Over several weeks during the summer of 2001 the family members retraced the steps of the Triangle Trade, visiting the DeWolf hometown of Bristol, Rhode Island, the slave forts on the coast of Ghana, and the ruins of family plantations in Cuba. The family met with scholars and held inter-racial dialogues in each country. "

The DeWolf slave traders were not in our direct line, which branched off with Edward’s daughter, Hanna.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:HqMx_zTbf60J:freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~villandra/OldGeocities/Readyhough/dewolf.html+%22Edward+DeWolf%22+slave&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a


 Balthasar DeWolf

1620- 1696

Immigrant Ancestor

A First Settler of Newhaven, Wethersfield, Lyme, and Saybrook, CT.

Witch Hunter, Tavern Keeper

 
Balthasar DeWolf

Edward DeWolf

Hannah DeWolf

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Balthasar DeWolf’s (1) origins are uncertain, many have been suspected.  He is thought to possibly be of an ancient and quite widespread European aristocratic family. Specific theories include Livonia, England, France, and Germany.  He wrote with an English style and hand typical of British upper crust, and gave all of his children English names, though that wasn't unusual in imigrants to New England of non-English stock. His name is Dutch or possibly German.  During the Protestant Reformation, many people from Holland ended up in both Germany and England, and people from France scattered in every direction, often through Belgium and Holland to Germany. People from England were likely to end up in Holland and eventually Germany, until the imigration to New England was well underway; only people with real resources could get to New England. Another thought is that the DeWolf family in Livonia (in the area of Finland) reputedly has a young son who ran away to sea at this time. Balthazar DeWolf, the American DeWolf ancestor who first appears in Hartford in 1643, presumably was the Livonia DeWolf who had run away.At least, this was the premise of a DeWolf family researcher earlier this century.

There is a view forming that that Balthazar was born in Germany to Joseph DeWolf, b est 1557-1604, d est 1598-1681 or 14, son of Joseph Henry DeWolf.  This is theory of Esther Clark McDermott at GenForum, she cites Carol McGinnis, Dolphs and DeWolph (1990's), Family Tree Maker, and a researcher named Sally Ann Joiner.

Balthasar married Alice Peck. His marriage to Alice Peck is recorded in “The Ancestors of Alex Lorenzo Tremble” (FTM Gen SiteRecorded in Port Jervis Union, 21 Dec 1910: Balthazar DeWolf joined the New Haven Colony but was too young to sign the New Haven Compact in 1639.

In "Records of the Particular Court of Connecticut" (Jan 1650-June 1663) it has several notations about Balthazar. On 5 Mar 1656: included among "those presented for smoaking in the street contra to law...Baltazar de Woolfe, presented by Will Marcum, constable for Mattabesick." The court fined him...and as tradition has it...he paid his fine, lit his pipe, and went out! He is mentioned and in Lyme, Court records in 1668, was living in 1695.

He owned a good deal of land in Lyme and Saybrook, and an entire island. He served in the militia.  Researchers point out that whoever he was, he was in a position to marry his children to the wealthiest and most prominent of his neighbors.  He owned Calves Island in Conn R at Old Lyme. Ct. Records; Widow Whiting, wife of Merchant Major Whiting of Hartford, won a suit against Balthazar for non payment of a debt. Recorded in Colonial Records Vol 2: 11 May 1671 Court of Election; He is recorded as a Freeman: 30 Jan 1663 Whethersfield, and Freeman 11 May 1671 Lyme. In 1677 he was chosen “Committee of the town”. Recorded in “Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England” p 44;DeWolf, Bathazar, of Wetherfield 1664, removed to Lyme 1668, has a daughter of age to live in a neighbors family. Sons, Edward, William, and Stephen join with him in 1678 as men of the town train band. Recorded in Saybrook Records; Vol 1 p141, 07 Jul 1662: Balthazar sold to Rev.(Joseph) Peck, 12 acres of calves pasture, 8 acres in 1,000 acres field bounded East by William Lord, on the South by the great highway to Oyster River, on the West by the highway to the mill, and on the North by the stone pits, with 150 pounds right in ox pasture, 150 pounds commonage in Town Commons, and 114 pounds right in Hamonasat, now Madison whatsoever shall LO belonging to the premises as above said as specified in bill of sale. Note signed by Joseph Peck above said record confirming 114 pounds of the right of Hamonasat was a mistake and of no validity. Rec. 01 May 1666. On 31 Mar 1674 to 23 Dec 1678, Balthazar was licensed to sell spirits on Lyme Road. Probate Records (23 Mar 1668) Balthazar submits letter quoting bible against Hannah’s employer. Balthazar gave his home lot and his wife’s meadow to Simon for care in his old age.

Balthazar’s occupations included:

  • ·          Attorney: 26 Sep 1656 became Attorney to Matthew Price in Whethersfield to collect debts owed in CT and NH
  • ·          Horse Breeder
  • ·          Tavern Keeper
  • ·          Townsman ( 24 Oct 1672, and 08 Jan 1673),  
  • ·          Commissioner, and Scrivener of Lyme (1674). A scrivener writes contracts or deeds.
  • Surveyor of Highways with Richard Smith Jr. (08 Oct 1675 and 04 Mar 167
  • ·          Tax Assesor 05 Aug 1679)
  • ·          Rate / debt Collector 27 Dec 1686)
  • He was also a member of the Lyme Train Band and the local Millitia. (In 1668 he signed a Militia Petition). Balthazar was also later noted as being a “witch hunter”.
 Children of Balthasar DeWolf and Alice Peck are:

1.        Edward Nathan DeWolf b 1646 Guilford CT d 1709/10 New London,CT 
2.        Simon DeWolf b ca 1648 Weatherfield, Hartford Co, d 1695 m 11/12/1682 m. Sarah Lay, daughter of John Lay, "a    great landowner".
3.        Stephen DeWolf b ca 1650 Weatherfield, d 10/17/1702 Lyme, New London   Co, CT m (1) Sarah Terry abt 1689 (2) Hannah Jones aft 1701 
4.        Mary (Marah)DeWolf b 1/10/1655/1656  Middletown,CT d 10/27/1724 Lyme, New Haven Co. m. as 2nd wife to Thomas Lee of Saybrook, said to have been very attractive. She m. 2 Matthew Griswold, her daughter Hannah Lee m Judge John Griswald, she had Gov. Matthew Griswold, and Phoebe Griswold who m Rev. Jonathan Parsons, ancestor of Blackhal line of Griswold family.
5.        Susanna DeWolf b 12/22/1664 East Saybrook, CT d aft 1735 New Haven  m (1) 1684 Henry Champion m (2) John Huntley 1709
6.        Joseph DeWolf : It apears from Middletown,CT records that  he is the Joseph De Wolf who drowned in a voyage to Antigo, 10/4/1719.  In 12/1742 his widow maried Daniel Merwin of Wallingford, CT.  He m 3/11/1713-4 Elizabeth Hubbard daughter of Richard Hubbard. He moved from Lyme to Middletown, bought land in Middletown, 1714. A son died as an infant, two girls.
7.        Hannah b 1652 Middletown,Middlesex,CT  d 3/28/1712 East Guilford,CT m William Stone 2/20/1673/4  in Guilford,Ct
8.        Daughter De Wolf b 9/5/1661 Middletown, in East Saybrook, New London, Connecticut d aft 9/5/1661 
9.        Alice De Wolf b 1658 Middletown, d 1661.
10.     Peter De Wolf b: ABT. 1670 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut

At a quarter court held at Hartford, September 5, 1661, Nicholas Jennings of Bride Plaine and his wife Margaret, of Saybrook, were indicted for “having entertained familiarity with Sathan… and by his help done works of above, ye course of nature, to ye loss of ye lives of several persons and in priculer ye wife of Reinold Marvin, and also the death of a daughter of Balthazar DeWolf, by “bewitching them both to death” with sorceries.” The jury did not agree; “the majority of them found them guilty and the rest, strong ground for suspicion.”

http://books.google.com/books?id=EMDabpjdotYC&lpg=PA98&ots=pjOzdnn1AB&dq=Nicholas%20Jennings%20witchcraft&pg=PA98#v=onepage&q=Nicholas%20Jennings%20witchcraft&f=false

(Source: Drake, Frederick C. "Witchcraft in the American Colonies, 1647-62" American Quarterly 20 (1968):694-725)
Ascendents and Descendants of Joseph De Wolf of Granby, Connecticut"; compiled by Oratia J. De Wolf; Coraopolis, Pennsylvania; 1902)

Charles DWolf of Guadaloupe, his ancestors and descendants. Being a complete genealogy of the “Rhode Island DWolfs,” the descendants of Simon De Wolf, with their common descent from Balthasar de Wolf, of Lyme, Conn. (1668). With a biographical introduction and appendices on the Nova Scotian de Wolfs and other allied families, with a preface by Bradford Colt de Wolf (1902)


 Edward DeWolfe

1646-1712

Carpenter, Millwright, Mill Owner & Tavern Keeper

 

Edward DeWolf

Hannah DeWolf

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Edward Nathan DeWolf (Balthasar1)was born ABT 1646 in Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut to Balthasar DeWolf and Alice Peck , He married Rebecca (Alice) Tinker, daughter of John Tinker and Alice Smith  (Rebecca was born about 1650 in Middletown, Middlesex, Connecticut.) Edward also married Rebeckah Masuer (Measure). Edward died 24 Mar 1712 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut. He is buried in the Duck River Cemetery in Old LymeNew London County Connecticut.

 
Edward fought in King Phillips War during the Great Swamp Massacre with his brother Steven . The Great Swamp Fight (also known as the Great Swamp Massacre) was a crucial battle fought during King Philip's War between the combined colonial militia in New England and the Narragansett tribe. For their service, they were granted the township of Narraganset, CT., now Voluntown, CT.

 

His headstone reads, “Here Lieth the body of M. Edward Dewolf Who died March the 24 1712, in the 66 year of his Age”, which would make his approximate year of birth 1646. The surname is a very old one in the Lyme area, and has been spelled in various ways. “Family-Histories and Genealogies’” by Edward Elbridge Salisbury, 1892, says the author was sent the autographs of Balthasar DeWolf and his son Edward, written thus: ‘Baltasar dewolf’ and ‘Edward dewolfe’.

 

Edward "was a man of property, like his father living in Lyme, and highly respected. He was not only a carpenter, but a millwright, the builder and operator of two saw-mills, and a grist-mill. That his high standing, integrity and good judgment,' says Mr. Dolph, were well known is proven by the fact that in 1682, after long delays and difficulties between the people of New London and their contractors for building their new church, Edward de Wolf, of Lyme...were called upon to go to New London and arbitrate between the builders and the people. ...in May, 1686, the town of Lyme laid out to Edward DeWolf twenty-two acres of land on account of his work for the town in the matter of the new meeting house. In 1688, Edward settled upon the Eight Mile River, and in the same year...built a grist mill. He subsquently built a second saw-mill near his hiome on the Eight Mile River." (Perry)

He belonged to the Congregational Church First Society Of Lyme. Edward DeWolf became disabled and William Measuer took care of him.

Children of Edward Nathan DeWolf and Rebecca Tinker are:

  1. Simon DeWolf was born 28 Nov 1671 in Middletown, Middlesex, Connecticut, and died ABT 1704 in New London, New London, Connecticut. He married Alice BOLT.
  2. Charles DeWolf was born 18 Sep 1673 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut, and died 5 Dec 1731 in Middletown, Middlesex, Connecticut.
  3. Benjamin DeWolf was born 3 Dec 1675 in Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut.
  4. Rebecca DeWolf was born ABT 1676 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut. She married Jonathan BECKWITH 26 Apr 1696 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut, son of Matthew BECKWITH and Elizabeth Mary LYNDE. He was born 26 Dec 1673 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut, and died ABT 1732
  5. Hannah DEWOLF was born ABT 1676 in Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut, and died 17 Dec 1755 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut. She married Benjamin HULL 17 Dec 1735 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, son of Benjamin HULL and Elizabeth ANDREWS. She married Benjamin STONE. She married Joshua Parmelee 23 Apr 1693 in Connecticut, son of John Parmelee and Hannah PLAINE. He was born ABT 1661 in Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut, and died 13 Jun 1729 in Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut. She married Thomas HART.
  6. Edward John DeWolf was born ABT 1677 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut, and died ABT 1724 in Middletown, Middlesex, Connecticut. He married Susannah DOUGLAS ABT 1708 in New London, New London, Connecticut, daughter of Robert DOUGLAS and Mary HEMPSTEAD. She was born ABT 1683 in New London, New London, Connecticut. He married Hannah ELY. She was born in New London, New London, Connecticut.
  7. Stephen DeWolf was born ABT 1679 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut, and died ABT 1709 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut. He married Elizabeth DOUGLAS.
  8. Mary DeWolf was born ABT 1681 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut, and died ABT 1704 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut. She married Edward STOCKER ABT 1698 in Connecticut.

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=8EFXoPQaD7YC&lpg=PA36&ots=19fCc6RM8Y&dq=%22Edward%20DeWolf%22%20slave&pg=PA34#v=twopage&q&f=true

Bodges Soldiers in King Phillips War Pg. 440-444

 Hannah DeWolfe

Abt. 1676-1755

Did Her Best to People the Colonies

 

Hannah DeWolf

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hannah DeWolfe (Edward2, Balthasar1) was born about 1676 in Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut, to Edward DeWolf and Rebecca (Alice) Tinker. . She married Benjamin Stone. She married Joshua Parmelee 23 Apr 1693 in Connecticut. She married Benjamin Hull 17 Dec 1735 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, son of Benjamin Hull and Elizabeth Andrews. Possibly married Thomas Hart after 1741. Hannah died17 DEC 1755 in Wallingford, New Haven County, CT.

 

The connections between the HILL, PARMELEE, and STONE families appears through industry and first families. A good number of towns incorporated at the same time: 1639. The tracing of vital and court records are the only definitive. Dorchester, MA families trace back to the Mayflower in many instances.

Dorchester, MA was historically known for the aggressive nature of its inhabitants toward industry. Windsor, CT history speaks to it the most because the Dorchester people literally pushed the Windsor people out of town. In tracing Dorchester, MA families you will find them fanning out wherever there was first industry (water-powered mills). The colonial families of Parmelee and Stone were known milling families. New England first colonial families – those who signed covenants and invested in the establishment of the towns with their personal wealth – married like London merchants, to keep title, land, and power close to the hearth.

The formation of Windsor, Stratford and Woodbury had much to do with industry but also to do with the formation of Puritan church. Stratford church history records a major split in the “standing order” or Congregational Church (Puritan) whereby Rev Zachariah Walker took over 100 followers to Woodbury (mid-1600’s). In the colonial period no town in the Colony of Connecticut could settle inhabitants without the consent of the General Assembly and a means to collect taxes. The connection to Walker demonstrates Hill to be Calvinist Puritan as were the members of families they married.

 

Goshen, CT borders Litchfield were Parmelee and Stone had mills. Goshen was a big milling town; the Parmelee’s led the industry there. Wallingford is yet another major milling town in CT. Given the fact that Hannah (De Wolfe) Stone Parmelee married Dr. Benjamin Hull of Wallingford, I can see where the connections would continue there as well as where other Parmelee’s migrated.

 

Children of Hannah DeWolfe and Benajah Stone are:

  1. Patience Stone was born 12 Nov 1703 in Guilford, New Haven Co., CT, and died 6 Nov 1767. She married Joseph Chittenden Jr. 14 Nov 1726, son of Joseph Chittende  and Mehitabel PIERCE. He was born 3 Jan 1709 in Guilford, New Haven Co., CT.
  2. Abraham Stone was born 24 Feb 1706 in Guilford, New Haven Co., CT, and died 4 Jan 1787 in Guilford, New Haven Co., CT. He married Martha HUBBARD 1734. She died 28 May 1793 in CT.
  3. Benajah Stone was born 25 Sep 1708 in Guilford, New Haven Co., CT, and died BEF 7 Nov 1757. He married Mary CHITTENDEN 28 Feb 1730 in Wallingford, New Haven Co., CT, daughter of Joseph CHITTENDEN and Mehitabel PIERCE. She was born 26 Mar 1710 in Guilford, New Haven Co., CT.
  4. Elisha Stone was born 14 Oct 1709 in Guilford, New Haven Co., CT.
  5. Hester Stone was born 1711 in Guilford, New Haven Co., CT. She married Isaac HILL.

 

Children of Joshua Parmelee and Hannah DeWolfe are:

 

  1. Lieutenant Jehiel Parmelee, b. June 13, 1718, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. January 15, 1776, Litchfield, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA.
  2. Hannah Parmelee, b. January 14, 1719/20; d. December 17, 1755; m. Benjamin Hull, December 17, 1735, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. Unknown.
  3. Charles Parmelee, b. July 3, 1722, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. Aft. 1748; m. Elizabeth Ennis, March 3, 1744/45, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; d. November 13, 1748, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.Notes for Charles Parmelee:Charles is listed on the Pennsylvania muster roll of the company of foot soldiers commanded by Captain John Shannon in September 1746 in King George’s War. He enlisted June 27 of that year as a carpenter.
  4. Lucy Parmelee, b. August 19, 1725; m. Joseph Parker, February 23, 1742/43, Wallingford;
  5. Sybilla Parmelee, b. March 29, 1727; d. 1775, Mississippi Territory; m. Ethan Lewis, June 18, 1746, Farmington, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA; b. 1724; d. 1775.
  6. Joel Parmelee was born 1679 in Durham, Connecticut, USA, and died July 20, 1748 in Durham, Connecticut, USA. He married Abigail Andrews June 30, 1706 in Durham, Connecticut, USA.
  7. Mary Parmelee, b. 1706; d. 1781.

 

Children of Hannah DeWolf and Dr. Benjamin Hull are:

 

  1. Lauren Hull (male)
  2. Charles Hull.

Deborah Dillingham
1660-Aft.1731

Deborah Dillingham
Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Deborah (Henry1) was born at Sandwich, Plymouth Colony, on 21 February 1660. She was the daughter of Henry Dillingham and Hannah Perry. She married Daniel Wing at Sandwich, Barnstable, Plymouth Colony, in 1686. She died at Sandwich, Barnstable, MA, after 1731.
Children of Deborah Dillingham and Daniel Wing are:

 

  1. Edward Wing b. 10 Sep 1687, d. b 26 Feb 1733/34
  2. Samuel Wing b. 12 Aug 1690, d. 12 Feb 1732/33
  3. Jemima Wing b. 14 Oct 1692
  4. Dorcas Wing b. 6 Oct 1695, d. b 22 Mar 1737
  5. Rebecca Wing b. 1 Jul 1700
  6. Zaccheus Wing b. 3 Apr 1703, d. 15 Mar 1784
  7. Hannah Wing b. 29 Oct 1705, d. 3 Mar 1778

 

Edward Dillingham

1595-1667

Founding Family of Sandwich MA

Henry Dillingham

Deborah Dillingham
Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Edward Dillingham  (1) (son of Henry Dillingham and Oseth) was born Dec 06, 1595 in Bitteswell, Leicestershire, England, baptized Dec. 6, 1595, at Cottesbach, Leicestershire, England. He married Ursula Carter on Feb 14, 1614 in Cotesbach, Leicestershire, England. Edward died 1667 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts.

From Frederic William Dillingham’s application to Sons of the Revolution:

Edward Dillingham of Bitteswell, Leicestershire, England who settled at Plymouth, 1632, Ipswich 1634, Saugus 1636 and Sandwich 1637 in the colony of Plymouth on or about the 2d day of April 1637. He was born in 1595, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Edward Dillingham, Deputy of Sandwich 1643 d.1667 Edward Dillingham, Gent, was freeholder of Bitteswell in 1630. Wife Drusilla d.Feb 6, 1656 (another note says wife Ursula d.Feb 9, 1656) Apr 3 1637 ten men including Edward made record of settlement at Sandwich. Number of families from Lynn, Duxbury and Plymouth. Mr Dillingham had 8 acres of meadow in Sandwich. Edward and brother John came in the fleet with Winthrop in 1630. Were first in Boston, then Ipswich. [This is wrong; John came in 1630, Edward in 1632. ED] Another note cites New England Historical and Genealogical Register Dillingham, Edward, Lynn, Witness at Salem Court in 1637, joined in the founding of Sandwich, propr. 3 Apr 1637. Wife Ursula d. Feb 9, 1656. Will, May 1, 1666 probated 5 June 1667 was in the form of a deed of gift to his two sons Henry and John. Property in his hands whose owners, specified, res. in Bitteswell and other places in Lancashire, Eng.

Another note, probably by Dean Dudley, refers to Savage’s Gen Dec New England Edward Dillingham came to Lynn Mass from Bitteswell in the County of Leicester England where he had an estate. [This agrees with my conclusion that Edward Dillingham Gent Freeholder was also Edward Immigrant. See my notes under The Rev Henry Dillingham. ED] The exact date of his arrival is not given but we find him in Lynn in 1636 and in 1637 he removed to Sandwich. He was a Rep to the Gen [unreadable] 1642. Had two sons, Henry and John, the latter born in England in 1630. [Another source gives Henry’s birth as 1627 ED] His will is dated May 1, 1666 probated Jun 1 1667 an abstract of which is printed in the New England His + Gen Reg Vol VII p 225.

From a letter from FWD to George Halsey Thompson, Registrar of OFPA …

As to his coming to this country Savage says Edward and John were probably brothers but Richard Saltonstall in a letter to Governor Winthrop 1636 says they were brothers. This in a letter to me from Dean Dudley. Savage further says they were relatives of Richard Saltonstall and Samuel Appleton. Dudley in another letter to me says they were brothers and came in the same ship. You know how badly Winthrop’s papers were scattered and destroyed but there is a fragment which says John Dillingham came in the Abigail, being No. 71 on the list.

I wrote my father’s sister Maria who told me the origin of the family was in three brothers who came from England. One settled in Mass., one in Vermont and the third in Maine. Maine was cut off from Mass in 1820, leaving us no ancient Maine lineage. Edward Dillingham and his brother John appear to have come from Bitteswell in Leicestershire, England. The family were landed gentry there before 1600, as may be seen in Nicholl’s History of that County. Their arms were: arg, ten fleur de lis, 4, 3, 2, 1, ppr. Edward was a legatee of his brother John of Ipswich, who died early, and Sir Richard Saltonstall and Governor Thomas Dudley helped to settle his estate. In 1632, Edward took cattle of Emanuel Downing of London for a third of the increase.

In 1637, Mr Dillingham was living at Saugus (Lynn), and with nine other men was by the Plymouth court, granted liberty to view a place in the old colony to sit down on, and have sufficient land for three score families, on the conditions propounded to them by the Government and Mr Winslow. These nine men were Edmond Freeman, Henry Feake, Thomas Dexter, William Wood, John Carman, Richard Chadwell, William Amey, Thomas Tupper, and George Knott. Most of these men settled at Sandwich, and in a list of Freemen of Sandwich, in 1643, are the names of Dillingham, Feake, Freeman, Knott, Chadwell and Tupper.

Mr Dillingham brought over from Bitteswell a herd of cattle which he took from his neighbors on shares; that is, he was to return the cattle with part of their increase in subsequent years. The fulfillment of this agreement is provided for in his will.

He was elected Deputy of Sandwich in 1643. Mr D. was one of the founders of Sandwich and a much respected citizen. His daughter Osea married Stephen Wing, who was town clerk of Sandwich in 1669. His wife’s name was Drusilla, who died 6 February 1656. Mr D. died in 1667. From ED: Of the list of founders and freemen of Sandwich, the names of Feake, Freeman and Tupper appear among the wives of later generations of Dillinghams. The document above identifies Drusilla as his wife, but as indicated above this is probably a copying error, because he married Ursula Carter in England and she was the mother of his children. No mention of a second marriage is found. The document quoted above was clearly a pamphlet genealogy “Dillingham Family” published in Yarmouthtown, Mass by C. W. Swift, Publisher and Printer in 1912. It is reprinted in the Cape Cod Library of Local History and Genealogy. From Alexander, pg 18a Son of the Rev Henry and Oseth ____, baptized 6 Dec 1595, at Cottesbach, Leicestershire, where his father was rector. He was made executor of the will of his father, who died in 1625, and was nearly all his property, becoming thereby a freeholder in Bitteswell, an adjoining parish. He married at Cottesbach, 14 Feb 1614, Ursula Carter, by whom he had at least seven children. But three of these came with him to America, Oseth, Henry and John. All the others probably died young, although the oldest, Elizabeth, may have married and remained in England. The parentage of Ursula Carter was not found, but in the parish record of Cottesbach, in the list of rectors, immediately preceding the record of death of Rev Henry Dillingham, is given “Edward Carter, 1601″. It may be found that Ursula was his daughter. [DILLIN.GED]

An Inventory of the goods of Sara Pery of Sandwich lately deceassed taken and prissed [appraised] this 8 of June 1659 by them whose names are under written.
l.-s.-d. [pounds-shillings-pence]
Imprimise five Cowes at …………………………………………… 17-00-0
It on 2 yeare old steere ……………………………………………. 02-05-0
It two yeare old Calves …………………………………………….. 03-00-0
It 12 yards of sarge …………………………………………………. 03-00-0
It on chest with some Cotton wooll &, divers other
smalle thinges ……………………………………………. 02-00-0
The whole some …………………………………. 27-05-0
[signed]
Edward Dillingham [father of Henry Dillingham,below]
Henry Dillingham, [husband of Hannah Perry, daughter of Edmund Perry and Sarah]
Thomas Burge [father-in-law of Ezra Perry, executor of Sarah Perry’s estate]

 

Edward was made executor of the will of his father, who died in 1625, and was left nearly all of his property in Bitteswell, and adjoining parish.

Edward and his family travelled onboard the ship William & Francis, arriving in Boston, MA in 1632. In 1637 he was one of ten residents of Lynn, MS to receive a grant of land from the general court that was to become Sandwich. Edward Dillingham was appointed on April 16, 1641, to divide the meadow land in Sandwich, of which eight acres were awarded to him. On September 27 of the following year he was chosen deputy from Sandwich to the general court at Plymouth, and in 1643 was on the list of those liable to bear arms in Sandwich. In 1647-48 he was one of those who made an inventory of the estate of James Holloway and George Knot. He was appointed in 1654 an associate of Richard Bourne to act in behalf of the town in a contract with Thomas Dexter for building a mill. At the same time he was appointed on a committee to frame a petition to the general court for a grant and assistance in the purchase of Mohamet. On May 18 of the next year he, with Thomas Dexter, was appointed to make a rate (tax) that would suffice to bring the town out of debt. He was also one of those who signed an invitation for a clergyman to settle at Sandwich, and in 1658 he was a member of a committee to determine the true boundary of the land of every inhabitant in Sandwich. In that year he was sued by an Indian because of injury to the latter, caused by Dillingham’s horse.

Edward died in Sandwich between May 1, 1666 and June 5, 1666, the dates of drawing and proving his will. His will is recorded in Book 4, Colonial Records, and published in the New Eng. Hist. Gen. Society’s Register, vol. VII, page 225.

 

Children of Edward Dillingham and Ursula Carter are:

  1. Elizabeth Dillingham, b. Apr 02, 1616, Cotesbach, Leicestershire, England, d. date unknown. (She is mentioned in her grandfather Henry’s will, 1624.)
  2. Marie, Dec. 2, 1618; probably died young.
  3. Oseth, Feb. 10, 1621-2, as “Osee”, Her name in the Sandwich records has been read as Oseah, but the parish register of Cottesbach gives the names of her aunt and grandmother as Oseth. It is likely she was named for them and should be Oseth.
  4. Henry Dillingham, b. 13 Oct 1624, Bitteswell, Leicestershire, England, d. Jul 26, 1705, Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts.
  5. Sarah, June 23, 1627; bur. Feb. 1, 1628-9.
  6. John, May 1, 1629; bur. May 9, 1629
  7. John, b. about 1630; d. May 27, 1715, in Harwich, Mass.

Children all baptized in Cottesbach, Leicestershire, England

The Ancestors of Robert Abell and Vol. III, pp. 1112-1114 of Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs, edited by Cuyler Reynolds (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911).
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wingfamilyofamerica/p377.htm#i2002939

http://capecodhistory.us/genealogy/wellfleet/i724.htm

http://www.genealogyofnewengland.com/f_1b7.htm#89

http://www.landersgen.com/landers/29/2759.htm

 

Henry Dillingham
1624- 1705

Immigrant Ancestor

Henry Dillingham

Deborah Dillingham
Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

 

Henry Dillingham (1) was born at Cotesbach, Leicester, England, on 13 October 1624. He was the son of Edward Dillingham and Ursula Carter. He married Hannah Perry at Sandwich, PC, on 24 June 1652. He died at Sandwich, Barnstable, MA, on 26 July 1705.

 

He left will dated Aug 1702; proved 21 Aug 1705.
Children of Henry Dillingham and Hannah Perry:

 

  1. Mary Dillingham b. 23 Dec 1653, d. a Aug 1702
  2. John Dillingham (II) b. 24 Feb 1658, d. 11 Sep 1746
  3. Deborah Dillingham b. 21 Feb 1660, d. a 1731
  4. Edward Dillingham b. 21 Apr 1665, d. 28 Mar 1739

Sarah Denman

1682-Aft 1773

Sarah Dimic

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Sarah Dimic (AKA “Sara” Denman, Denmin, or Dunning) (Philip2,John1) was born 15 Sep 1682 in Derby, New Haven, Connecticut  to Philip Denman and Hasadiah Slough. Sarah married Thomas Beardsley 18 July 1707, and died in Trumbull, Fairfield County, Connecticut. I don’t know where the “Dimic” comes from; her father was Philip Denman, and all the records in books I have seen refer to her as Denman. However, many of the online resources refer to her as “Dimic”, (while still giving her father the Denman name) which is a middle European name.

 

“She was dismissed to Ripton (now Huntington) Church in 1724, whither they had probably removed a short time before.”

 

 Children of Sarah Dimic and Thomas Beardsley are:

 

  1. Israel Beardsle born 03 December 1708 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; died 1791 in Newton, CT
  2. Sarah Beardsley, born 24 March 1708/09; married Icabod Lewis.
  3. Mary Beardsley, born 1712 in Stratford, CT; died in Trumbull, CT; married Peter Mallory 1730 in Connecticut.
  4. Hannah Beardsley, born 28 May 1715; died 23 February 1784 in Redding, CT; married Jacob Lane 02 August 1733 in Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT; born 1712; died 1762
  5. Elizabeth Beardsley, born 26 October 1716; married George McEwen
  6. Esther Beardsley, born Abt. 1718; married Benjamin Deforest.
  7. Henry Beardsley, born 19 May 1720
  8. Thomas Beardsley, born 19 May 1720.
  9. Thankful Beardsley, born 08 July 1729; died 08 June 1787 in Huntington, CT.

A history of the old town of Stratford and the city Bridgeport, Connecticut, Volume 2

 

Mary Elizabeth Edwards(?)

Est. 1685-1751

 

Mary Elizabeth Edwards

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Elizabeth Edwards* was born  about 1685. She married Daniel Mosher in 1704 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., MA Mary Elizabeth died: 1751, Dartmouth, Bristol Co., MA.

 

Children of Daniel Mosher and Mary Edwards are:

 

  1. Benjamin Mosher, born April 19, 1706; died Unknown.
  2. Daniel Mosher, born July 01, 1709; died Unknown.
  3. Micah Mosher, born September 27, 1711; died Abt. 1712.
  4. Constant Mosher, born September 11, 1713; died Unknown.
  5. Rachel Mosher, born June 14, 1715; died Unknown; married ? Herinden; died Unknown.
  6. George Mosher, born May 09, 1717 in Dartmouth, Massachusetts; died 1784; married Hannah Wing August 09, 1741.
  7. Ephraim Mosher, born December 28, 1718; died Unknown.
  8. Roger Mosher, born March 30, 1720; died Unknown.
  9. Hugh Mosher, born March 17, 1721/22; died Unknown.
  10. Patience Mosher, born June 29, 1724; died Unknown; married ? Brownell; died Unknown.
  11. Mercy Mosher, born October 12, 1726; died Unknown; married ? Trafford; died Unknown.

 

*Some sources have this person listed at Elizabeth Edwards. Middle names were not commonly used in this era, and did not really come into vogue for nearly 100 years. I don’t know which (if either) is correct.

 

Hulda Earl

Abt. 1700-1757

Mother of Ten

 

Hulda Earl

Anna Brockett AKA Hulda Earl Brockett.

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hulda Earl (AKA Earls,Eels, Ells, Ellis)was born about 1700,  and her family history is unknown. She married John Brockett on 1 Mar 1711.  Huldah Earl died 29 Mar 1757 in Wallingford CT.

 

Children of John Brockett and Hulda Earls are:

 

  1. Daniel Brockett –Born April 3, 1712;
  2. David Brocket–Born November 28, 1714, died 1761, unmarried;
  3. Anna Brocket  AKA Hulda Earl Brockett–Born Feb. 2, 1716, married Gideon Hotchkiss;
  4. Ebenezer Brocket–Born circa 1717, died 1761;
  5. Christopher Brocket–Born April 9, 1718, lived at Weathersfield, Conn.;
  6. Mehitable Brocket–Born April 3, 1719, died before 1759;
  7. Lois Brocket–Born 1721, married a Mr. Dudley;
  8. Mable Brocket–Born circa 1723, married a Mr. Green, died April 21, 1806;
  9. Elisha Brocket–Born May 31, 1726;
  10. John Brocket–Born Feb. 14, 1728, married Jemima Tuttle.

Mary Katherine Elithorpe

1592-1688

Immigrant Ancestress

Founding Family of Milford, CT

 

Mary Katherine Elithorpe

Martha Miles

Mary Pardee

Stephen Hotchkiss

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Katherine (AKA Catherine, AKA Katherine) Elithorpe (or Ellithorpe)

 was born in 1592 in Wormley, Hertfordshire, England. She was christened on Nov 5 1606 in Gisburn, Yorkshire, England. She was married to Mormonduke Constable (a descendant of Charlemagne)on May 17 1632. She was married to Richard Miles in 1641/42 in New Haven, Fairfield,  Connecticut. She died on Jan 27 1688 in , Milford, New Haven, CT.

 

She was the second or third wife of Richard Miles, and he was (probably) her second husband since she is also called “widow Constable” . I have read that she had children of this marriage, but can not find any.
In 1646, Sister Myles is assigned to sit in the 4th seat in the women’s section in the middle seats of the Meeting House. Richard Miles sold land belonging to his wife (widow Constable) on Oct. 5, 1652 to Moses Wheeler in New Haven. Catherine is named in the will of Richard Miles in 1666.

 

February 1, 1639, is the date the area then known as “Wepawaug” was purchased from Ansantawae, chief sachem of the Paugusset Tribe. Settlers began arriving shortly thereafter and began to build the town known as Milford. Buried treasure is said to exist on a small island the Indians called “Poquahaug”, just a mile off Silver Sands Beach. It is a recognized fact that Captain Kidd and other pirates sailed and hid along the Connecticut coast about the time that Katherine lived there.
Pictured above is a stone on the Memorial Bridge over the Wepawaug River in Milford honoring Richard & Katherine Miles as founders of Milford.

Children of Richard Miles and Mary Katherine Elithorpe were:

  1. Francis MILES was born on Jan 24 1627/28 in Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. She was buried on Sep 15 1628.
  2. Anne MILES, b. about 1630 in England
  3. Martha Miles    christened on 11 June 1632 at Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. She was born circa 1633 at Wormley, Hertfordshire, England., m. George Pardee, d. 1662
  4. Mary Ince MILES, was christened on Aug 30 1623 in Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. She was born in 1635 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. She died on Sep 12 1730 in New Haven, New Haven, CT. She was buried on Oct 24 1983. She was married to Jonathan INCE on Dec 12 1654 in , New Haven Co., Connecticut.She was married to Thomas HANFORD Rev. on Oct 22 1661 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.
  5. Richard MILES,  was born in 1637 in Wormley, Hertfordshire, England. He died in 1669 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, m. Experience COLLICATT on Sep 8 1659
  6. Samuel MILES, was born on Apr 12 1640 in Milford, New Haven, CT. He was christened on Apr 22 1640 in Milford, Fairfield Co., CT. He died on Dec 24 1678 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. He was married to Elizabeth DOWSE on Oct 16 1659 in Boston, , Mass.He was married to Hannah WILMOT on Apr 9 1667 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
  7. Anna MILES, was born on Oct 7 1642 in Wallingford, Fairfield, Conn., Connecticut. She was christened on Oct 7 1642 in Wallingford, Fairfield, , Connecticut. She died on Apr 11 1687 in Wallingford, Fairfield, , Connecticut. She was buried on Apr 11 1687 in Wallingford, Fairfield, , Connecticut. She was married to Sammuel STREET on Nov 3 1664 in New Haven, New Haven, CT. Hannah MILES, was born on Oct 7 1642 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut. She was christened on Oct 7 1642 in , Milford, New Haven, CT. She died on Jul 19 1730. to Samuel STREET on Nov 3 1664.
  8. John MILES Capt.. was born in Oct 1644 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. He was christened in Oct 1644 in Congregational, Church, New Haven, Conn.. He died on Nov 7 1704 in Nh, Nh, CT. He was buried in Grove St Cem, New Haven, CT. He has Ancestral He was married to Experience HERRIMAN on Apr 11 1665 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts.He was married to Mary ALSOP on Nov 2 1680 in New Haven, New Haven, Conn.

 

Elizabeth French

1664-1739

Elizabeth French

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Death: Nov. 18, 1739
age 76 yrs
Inscription on a red sandstone in the old cemetery at Wallingford:
Here lieth ye Body of Elizabeth ye Wife of Joseph Holt.
She departed this Life November ye 18, 1739 in the 76th year of her age.

Only the footstone with her initials E.H. remains in the Holt row

 

Elizabeth French (Francis2, William1)was born on 20 Jun 1664 in Derby, CT, the daughter of Frances French & Lydia Bunnell. On November 20, 1684 when Elizabeth was 20, in Wallingford or New Haven, CT, she married Joseph Holt.. She married Joseph Doolittle on 5 Oct 1720. Elizabeth died in Wallingford, CT, on 18 Nov 1739; she was 75. She is buried in Center St. Cem., Wallingford.

 

Public Records of the Colony of Conn, Vol. 4, p. 253, May, 1698

This court grants liberty and full power to Elizabeth Holt, widow and relict of Joseph Holt late of Wallingford deceased to make sale of 25 acres of unimproved land belonging to the estate of her deceased husband, for the payment of a debt due the said estate.

The children of Elizabeth French and Joseph Holt are:

 

  1. Joseph Holt (10 Jun 1685-2 Jun 1767)
  2. Daniel Holt (6 Oct 1687-1749)
  3. Capt. Benjamin Holt (3 Sep 1690-28 Oct 1742)
  4. Mary Holt (29 Jan 1693/4-ca 1729)
  5. Elizabeth Holt (23 Mar 1696-3 Jun 1768)

 

Francis French

Abt. 1625-1691

Immigrant Ancestor

Frances French

Elizabeth French

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Francis (sometimes spelled Frances) French (William1)was born about 1625 in England to Capt. William French & Elizabeth (Eliza) Elizabeth Symmes (or Godfrey in another source) * of Billerica, MA, He married Lydia Bunnell 10 Apr 1661 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. Francis died on 14 Feb 1690/1 in Derby, CT. (Lydia died on 1 Apr 1708 in Derby, CT.)
From old text: Francis, son of William French, came to Milford, probably in 1650, with Edward Wooster, who may have been his brother-in-law, and settled in Derby with Wooster in 1654, being then twenty nine years of age. Here he continued, working to establish his home in the wilderness, until 1661, when, on April 10th, he married Lydia Bunnell, of Milford, and brought her to his home; which constituted the third or fourth family in the plantation.

His house was located on the hill east of the old Jonathan Jackson farm, near Merritt Clark’s, who now owns most of the old farm, which remained in the family until some time in the present century. Here on the hill he toiled to clear the forests to make the beautiful fields as they now appear on that western slope. His almost solitary axe sounded over the spreading valley to the opposite hills, several years when scarcely another sound of the kind could be heard across the whole amphitheatre, which is now become a marve’ous wonder of life and business. How lonely then, yet how grand the mighty forests stood, covering all those beautiful hills; but how magic-like the change to the present animated theatre of gayety, refinement, riches and enjoyment, as well as marvelous skill of toil and industry. No prophetic poet could have pictured to Francis French and his bride, in his new home, a hundredth part of the royalty of useful learning, art and skilled science that should, within two hundred years, sit in the valley at their feet and touch with the thrill of business life the utmost ends of the earth. The gold of India, China, Japan and the islands of the sea springs into life at the skilled movement of the ready hands of the people of this beautiful valley.

In 1655, Edward Riggs, also of Milford, built a stockaded house, a mile east of Woosters, on the hill, at what is now Pulaski Highway, across from Upland Terrace. Here, the English refugees, judges Whalley and Goff, sought refuge from King Charles I., in 1661, whom they had condemned earlier. This is the new sight of Ansonia High School. Shortly afterward, his brother-in-law, Thomas Langdon, built his home at the northern edge of this hill settlement, later called Squabble Hole, so named, for two feuding families by the name of Weed. Old stone walls and foundations can be found as evidence of those early settlers. Francis French built the fourth house on the western edge of Squabble Hole, and settled there with his new bride, in 1661.

These four homesteads, along with Wooster’s, were the only ones between New Haven and Massachusetts at that time. It was a 20-mile walk to the Milford settlement for Sunday worship services, which were obligatory, in those days. Settlers were expected to pay taxes and support the church, the clergy and the meeting house. In May (1672), the thirty settlers voted to establish and support their own local church and clergy. In 1673, they purchased a lot at Squabble Hole, and six months later, built a £ 100 dwelling for the Reverend John Bowers.

Francis French did his work faithfully and manfully, without show or public notoriety, and left the stage of action Feb. 14, 1691, aged 66 years. His widow Lydia Bunnell continued some years the care of those committed to her love, and departed this life April 1, 1708.

This deed brought into the Recorders office the 15 day of December in the year— 1709

p me Abel Gunn town dark

To all to whome these presents Shall come Know yee that wee Lydya ffrench ye relict of Frances ffrench off Derby deceased & Frances french Son off ye afore Said Frances french both off ye Towne off Derby in ye countie off New haven in his majesties Colony off Connecticot in New England for & in consideration of Six & thirty pounds & eighteen Shillings in hand receved of Mr alexander Bryan off Milford decesed & divers other good & well advised considerations us there unto moveing have Sould & do by these presents fully freely & absolutely Sell alienate assigne Set over give grant & confirme unto mrs. Sybil Bryan off Milford ye relict off mr Alexander Bryan afore sd & to her heires excecators administrators & assigns all our house & home Stead in Derby Scituate by ye meadow gate containing two acers more or lesse bounded east with ye comon west with Capt. Johnson low land South with ye bureing place North with ye meadow high way For her ye afore Sd Relict Bryan her heirs & assigns to have hold use occapy possess & enjoy as her & their own proper estate & Inheritance from ye date of these presents for ever with out any manner off let hinderance molestation disturbance denyal challenge Clayme eviction ejection trouble demand off or by us the foresaid Lydia ffrench & Frances ffrench our heirs executors & administrators or from or by any other person or persons for from by or under us affirming our Selves to be ye true proprietors off ye aboveSd house & home Stead & shall we have in our selves good right & full power to Sell ye Same & do free & clear & freely & clearly acquit exonerat & discharge ye a bove sd house & homestead from all other & former gifts grants bar. gaines sales mortgages joynters dowries wills entailes rents taxes & encumbrances w’ Sover and we do futher ingage & Covenant firmely by these present for our Selves our heirs executors & administrators to & with ye a foreSd Relict Bryan her heirs assignes to Signe Seal & deliver any other firmer deed & conveyance off ye afore Said house & homes Stead as ye Said Relict Bryan her heirs & assignes Shall be advised by their council learned in ye Law and for ye confirmation off all which wee have to these preses put to our hands & Seals this furst day off Febuary one thousand seven hundred & one or tow

She maintaining ye fence there unto belonging in the general line

Signed Sealed & delivered lidia a french

in the presence off us her mark (Seal)

Stephen person ffrances french (Seal

Adino Strong

lyda french and frances french both apeared before me and acknowlledg the Above and within writen instrement to be their one act and deed this twelft: day of febuary the year Above written

Ebenezer Johnson Justis

Children of Francis French and Lydia Bunnell are:

 

  1. Lydia French b.21 AUG 1662 in Derby, New Haven, CT d.07 SEP 1669 in Derby, New Haven, CT Died age 7
  2. Elizabeth French  b.20 JUN 1664 in Derby, New Haven, CT d.18 NOV 1739 Spouse Joseph Holt
  3. Anna French  b.10 AUG 1666 in Derby, New Haven, CT d.DEC 1690 Spouse: Thomas WHEELER
  4. Mary French b.07 SEP 1668 in Derby, New Haven, CT d.16 JAN 1689 in Derby, New Haven, CT did not marry
  5. Lydia French  b.28 SEP 1670 in Derby, New Haven, CT Spouse: Samuel BOWERS
  6. Samuel French b.06 JAN 1672 in Derby, New Haven, CT d: 26 OCT 1677 in Derby, New Haven, CT Died age 5
  7. Susannah French b.06 JUN 1675 in Derby, New Haven, CT
  8. Francis French  b.11 FEB 1677 in Derby, New Haven, CT d.: 11 SEP 1751 in Derby, New Haven, CT Spouse: Anna BOWERS He lived on his father’s homestead; was high sheriff of the town was a man of positive character, and stood high as a Royal Arch Mason.
  9. Jane (AKA Hannah) French  b.18 NOV 1679 in Derby, New Haven, CT d. 04 MAY 1750 in Derby, New Haven, CT Spouses John TOWNER (ancestors of Charles GOODYEAR).

 

*There is speculation that Francis was the adopted son or nephew of William. http://www.frenchfamilyassoc.com/FFA/CHARTS/Chart002/

 

The history of the old town of Derby, Connecticut, 1642-1880: With biographies and genealogies Samuel Orcutt, Ambrose Beardsley

Town records of Derby, Connecticut, 1665-1710: copied and compared with the original by Nancy O. Phillips

 

 

Lt. William French

Abt. 1605-1681

Immigrant Ancestor

Deacon, Author, Tailor, Servant

Eight Children Predeceased Him

William French

Francis French

Elizabeth French

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Lt. William French was was born in Halsted, Essex County, England, Abt. 1606 (another source: March 15, 1603) to William French. He married Elizabeth Symmes (or Godfrey in another source) (believed to be Elizabeth Symmes, sister of Rev. Zachariah Symmes), in England about 1623 or 1625. Elizabeth died on 31 March 1668 in Billerica, Middlesex Co., MA. William, at age 66, took his second wife on May 6, 1669 at Billerica, MA. He wedded Mary Lothrop (b. Oct. 4, 1640), widow of John Stearns of Billerica, Middlesex Co., MA, and daughter of Thomas Lothrop and Mary (Learned) Ewer. Mary had 6 children by her first marriage (John, Isaac, Samuel, Isaac, Nathaniel, and Thomas), and married third 1684 Isaac Mixer, Jr.married (6 May 1669) Mary, dau. of Thomas and Sarah Lothrop (name later written Lathrop) and widow of John Stearns. William French died November 20, 1681.

One if his decendants, namesake William French has been called

 “The first martyr to the cause of American Independence.”

William French came in the Defence, landing at Boston Oct. 3, 1635. They embarked on 4 July 1635 with his family: “Elizabeth French, 30; Elizabeth French, 6; Marie French, 2-1/2; Francis French, 10; Jo: French, 5 mo.” were all listed as beng from Fenchurch, London, Middlesex, England. They sailed from London.  Master of the ‘Defence‘ on the voyage departing England on Aug. 10, 1635 was Thomas Bostock. (Edward Pearce was first listed as master, but it was later changed to Mr. Bostock). The family settled at Cambridge. William was with his wife Elizabeth, his eldest child Francis, aged ten years, and three other children, down to the baby, four months old, from Essex, England. This is shown by the record in the Custom-House. William and his family came to America with Rev. Thomas Shepard and his brother Samuel, Roger Harlakenden, and George and Joseph Cooke.

William French was one of the original settlers of the beautiful town of Billerica, eighteen miles north of Boston. William’s home in Cambridge was on the westerly side of Dunster Street, between Harvard Square and Mt. Auburn Street, purchased in 1639 and sold Jun. 19, 1659.  He removed (an old fashioned word for “moved”) to Billerica, Middlesex Co., MA in 1652.  He was a Freeman Mar. 3, 1635/6; Sergeant 1642, nominated Lt. 1645 and confirmed 1647; and representative of Billerica 1660, 1663 and 1664.

He held many offices of trust, showing that much confidence was placed in him when to hold office was to bear great responsibility.

 

William’s first 4 children were born in England, but we do not have those records of births. William, his wife Elizabeth, and these 4 children immigrated in the winter. “Now one cause of our going at this time of winter was, because we were persecuted in Old England for the truth of Christ, which we profess here. We durst not stay to make ourselves known, which would have been at the baptizing of the child. Hence we hastened for New-England.” Because of this statement, we know few baptisms were accounted for at this time.

 

He was the first man chosen “to sit in the deacon’s seat,” 1659; A tailor by trade, he had two ‘families’, with 8 children born by 1646, and 4 more born 1670-1676 when he was age 67-73.William French, christened 6 Apr 1606 in Halstead, England, as the son of William French. See image below.

 

We know that William was aged 30 at time of his migration in 1635 and aged “about seventy & six years” on 5 June 1679. William had a brother named John who was in Cambridge by 1637 and had a daughter named Sarah.

 

On 3 July 1635, William French, 30 and Elisa, his wife, 32 were mentioned as servant to Roger Harlakenden, who took the Oath of Allegiance & Supremacy from the Minister & Justice of Peace. William, being a servant, would not have been eligible to take this oath. Once freed from Harlakenden’s servitude, William became a tailor.

 

We know that William was educated, since he signed his will. More importantly, he sent to a friend in England “the relation of one Indian of two years profession, that I took from his own mouth by an interpreter, because he cannot speak or understand one word of English; this document was then included in a pamphlet: “Strength Out of Weakness; or a Glorious Manifestation of the Further Progresse of the Gospel among the Indians of New-England Held Forth in Sundry Letters from divers Ministers and others...” This tract was published in London in 1652. As seen by his title, William served in the local militia. He was admitted to Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Boston, Suffolk co., MA (still extant!) in 1638 and quickly moved up the ranks — which indicates more popularity with his fellow soldiers than military prowess. He became Sergeant on 27 September 1642; was nominated as Lieutenant on 1 October 1645and confirmed as such on 26 May 1647 He was still a Lieutenant at the time of his daughter Abigail’s birth in 1673. There seems to be no support in the colonial records for a title of Captain, and his estate inventory and settlement papers consistently name his as Lt. William French.

 

His inventory included an “old musket & gun barrel” valued at 12s.. William took the Freeman Oath on 3 March 1635/6 — seventh in sequence of 11 Cambridge men. His town service in Cambridge, Middlesex co., MA consisted of serving on the petit jury of 3 December 1639. William was “Comitioner to establish the cuntry rates” the same year; one of the first selectmen in 1660, and served nine years; committee to examine children and servants in “Reading, religion, and the catechism,” 1661; the first deputy, or representative of Billerica in the general court at Boston, chosen in 1660, and taking his seat in 1663.

 

Once he moved to Billerica, Middlesex co., MA in 1652, his town service picked up considerably. He was empowered to marry others in Billerica, Middlesex co., MA on 15 May 1667 and in Billerica & Chelmsford, Middlesex co., MA on 18 October 1659. Finally, he was a deputy (much like a local representative to the State Legislature) from Billerica, Middlesex co., MA to the Massachusetts Bay General Court on 19 December 1660, 27 May 1663 and 3 August 1664.

On 23 May 1655, the General Court considered a petition to which William French was a signer, asking that the residents of Shawshin (once part of Woburn, Middlesex co., MA and now the town of Burlington, Middlesex co., MA) be freed of all taxes and rate from the town of Cambridge.

William was admitted to the Cambridge Church prior to taking his Freemanship oath on 3 March 1635/6. In January 1658/9 list of Cambridge church members are “William French & Elizabeth his wife both are members in full communion, Their children [:] Elizabeth now Elliot & now joined at Dedham. Mary baptized in England between 2 and 3 years old at her father’s joining. John baptized by Mr. Hooker in Cambridge. Sarah, Jacob, Hannah born and baptized in this Church”[William first settled in Cambridge, Middlesex co., MA but in 1652, he moved to Billerica, Middlesex co., MA. He made many real estate transactions and so is easy to track through deeds and land records. In Cambridge, he had one house on the 8 February 1635/6 list of “those men who have houses in the town”[On 6 February 1636/7, he was granted two acres of land in Cambridge.In 1639, he held two parcels of land: “bought of Mr. Richard Champnes, one dwelling house & garden”; and “given by the town two acres of land in the New West Field” By 1639, William French had sold to John Sill “one house with garden and backside in the town”.

In the Cambridge land inventory of 6 September 1642, William French held four parcels : “in the town one dwelling house with about half a rood of ground”; “in the New West Field two acres”; “on the south side of Charles River, eight acres more or less being the seventh lot in the lower division of lots”; and “in the upper division of those lots eight acres more or less being the three and fiftieth lot there”[30].

In 1645, William French was granted “six acres & half” “on the west side of Monotamye [Menotomy – a now-extinct twon which comprised parts of Cambridge, Somerville and Arlington, Middlesex co., MA] River”; on or soon after 10 December 1646, William French sold to Edward Winship :”in the lots beyond Menotomy six acres & half”[32].

On 15 August 1646, William French sold to Andrew Stevenson “four acres of land more or less in New West Field”[33]. On a later unknown date, William French held five acres in Fresh Pond Meadow. In the division of “Shaw Shine” [the aforementioned “Shawshin”, now Burlington, Middlesex co., MA] on 4 June 1652, “Lt. William French” received Lot #24, 150 acres.

On 27 Feb 1654/5 William French of Cambridge, tailor, sold to Gilbert Crackbone of Cambridge, husbandman, “four acres of land…in a planting field commonly called there West Field”.

On 10 June 1656 “William French of Cambridge…, tailor,” saold to “William Barret of the same place, tailor,…my now mansion house situated in Cambridge before named with about half a rood of land adjoining to the same…, also a barn and outhouse standing on the east adjoining the highway with about half a rood of land adjoining thereto”37.

On — February 1667/8, “William French of Billerica…in consideration of a valuable sum of money, to me well and truly paid, by Sgt. John Parker (now deceased) sometimes of Billerica aforesaid, for the use and behoof of Jonathan Danforth” of Billerica, deed to Jonathan Danforth a parcel of meadow in Billerica “containing by estimation one acere and three quarters”.

On 29 November 1678, “William French of Billerica…for and in consideration of the love & affection he beareth to his son Jacob French, as also for the full & final accomplishment of a contract & agreement made between the said W[illia]m French & Elder Richard Champney of Cambridge deceased, upon the marriage of the said Jacob French to Mary, the daughter of the said Elder Chamney, ” deeded to Jacob French a parcel of land in Billerica “containing by estimation twenty-five acres lying on the Pine Plain”[39,40].

On 2 April 1650 the “Court granted W[illia]m French right and power of administration upon the estate of his brother John French deceased, and do confirm and allow of his disposal of the children”.

In his own will, dated 5 June 1679 and proved 20 December 1681, “W[illia]m French of Billerica, aged about seventy & six years,” declared that “I have already given to all by children that have been already married their portions, I only add to them as followeth: to the eldest son of John French, to W[illia]m the son of Jacob French, to Elizabeth daughter [of] Richard Ellis, to Jonathan the son of Jhonathan Hides, to the eldest daughter of Jonathan Peake, to Marah the daughter of John Brackett, which are all my grandchildren, to each person as aforesaid twenty shillings”; residue to “my beloved wife, & to those children born to me by her, to be divided to each at the discretion of our honored county court after my decease”; “my beloved wife & my son Jacob French” executors; at the time of probate, there was “allowed to the [illegible] of the children £6 13s. 4d., to the widow 1/3 the remainder, to the widow the remainder 2/3 equally to be let out by Lt. Jonath[an] Danforth, Joseph Thompson & Josiah Converse to each his part & the widow to have the benefit of the children’s portion for the bringing up & education until they come of age to choose thier guardians.”

The inventory of the estate of “Lt. W[illia]m French of Billerica who deceased 20 November 1681 being his 78 year of age”, taken 6 December 1681, totalled £231 12s. 10d. (against which were debts of about £25), of which £104 was real estate: “house & barn, homestead, meadows & outlands,” £104; presented 8 December 1681 by “Mary French executrix to the estate of Lt. French her deceased husband”.

On 6 December 1687, “the estate of Lt. William French of Billerica (who deceased the 20.9 m.1681)” was divided, “to the widow one-third part of the whole estate and to the three children the remaining two-thirds, equally, ” the widow receiving £60 14s. 10d., “Mary French (now Sharp),” £40 10s., “Sarah French” £40 10s., and “Hannah French” £40 10s.; this division was acknowledged on 20 August 1722 by “Sarah Crosbey, Mary Dunklin & Hannah Child (daughters of the within mentioned Will[ia]m French deceased)”.

William died aged 78, having had ten children born in America. His will was made Jun. 5, 1679, and proved Dec. 20, 1681. William died in Billerica, Middlesex co., MA on 20 November 1681; he was “in [his] 78th year”.

The children of William French and Elizabeth Symmes are:

 

 

  1. Francis French (1624-1691) m. 4/10/1661 Lydia Bunnell (nine children)
  2. Elizabeth French(1629-   ) m. 1650 Richard ELLIS   Dedham, Massachusetts  (7 children)
  3. Mary (or Maria) French (1633-5/27/1672) m. Jonathan HYDE   Cambridge, MA   (14 children)
  4. John French (2/ /1635-10/ /1712) m.Abigail COGGIN (       -4/5/1662)m. 2nd 7/3/1663  Hanna BURRAGE (       -7/7/1667)m. 3rd  1/14/1768 Mary ROGERS (       -6/16/1677) m. 4th  1/16/1678 Mary KITTREDGE (        -1719)
  5. Sarah French (3/ /1638-       ) m.  Jonathan PEAKE      (10 children)
  6. Jacob French (3/16/1640-5/20/1713)  m.9/20/1665 Mary CHAMPNEY Billerica, MA (10 children) m. 2nd Mary CONVERS (  -6/18/1686)  (one child)  m. 3rd Mary m. 4th Ruth
  7. Hannah French  (4/12/1641-6/20/1642)  died at fourteen months
  8. Hannah French (2/16/1644-5/9/1674)  m. 9/6/1661  John BRACKETT  (nine or ten children)
  9. Samuel French  (12/3/1645-7/16/1646)  died at seven months
  10. Samuel French  (1648-11/4/1727) m. Elizabeth CHAMPNEY   (perhaps a sister of Jacob’s wife) m. 2nd 12/24/1682  Sarah CUMMINGS  (1/28/1661-)

 

Children of William French and Mary Lothrop are:

 

  1. Sarah French (10/29/1671-       )  m. Joseph CROSBY    (12 children)
  2. Abigail French (4/14/1673-4/13/1674)    one year
  3. Hannah French (1/25/1676-        )  m. John CHILD   Watertown, Massachusetts This was the third daughter named Hannah.  William was 72 when she was born.
  4. Hannah French  m. ….. FAY     (child: Jonathan FAY)

 

Of his 14 children, only six were living at the time of his death: John, Jacob, Samuel, Mary, Sarah, Hannah.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

A descendant of Lieutenant William French through his second son, John, himself named William French, a resident of Dummerston in the New Hampshire Grants, was the celebrated victim of the “Westminster Massacre” in 1775. As this was the direct result of the first organized resistance to British authority in the American colonies, William French had been claimed as the first martyr to the cause of American Independence. On his tombstone is still to be seen the following quaint inscription:

1n memory of William French.
Son to Mr. Nathaniel French. Who
Was shot at Westminister March ye 13th.
1775, by the hands of Cruel Ministerial tools
Of Georg ye 3d. 1n the Outhouse at 11 a clock
at Night 1n the ‘-‘M year of his Age.

“HERE WILLIAM FRENCH his Body lies.
For Murder his Blood for Vengeance Cries
King George the third his Tory Crew
tha wilh a Bawl his head Shot threw.
For Liberty and his Countrys Good,
he Lost his Life his Dearest blood.”

*Read “Strength Out of Weakness” here:  http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924028652224#page/n11/mode/2up

Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of Worcester County, Massachusetts:

with a history of Worcester Society of Antiquity, Volume 2 Ellery Bicknell Crane,The Lewis Publishing Company, 1907

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s, Source Publication Code: 263 Primary Immigrant: French, William Annotation: Part 1, pp. 1-43, is a study of emigration to New England in colonial times; part 2, pp. 45-207, lists passengers and the ships they arrived on (3,600 passengers on 213 ships). From the Custom House records of English ports. Much of the information is from Source Bibliography: BANKS, CHARLES EDWARD. The Planters of the Commonwealth; a Study of the Emigrants and Emigration in Colonial Times: To Which Are Added Lists of Passengers to Boston and to the Bay Colony; the Ships which Brought Them; Their English Homes, and the Places of Their Settlement in Massachusetts, 1620-1640. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1930. 231p. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1961. Repr. 1984. Page: 168

THE PLANTERS OF THE COMMONWEALTH A study of the Emigrants and Emigration in Colonial Times to which are added Lists of Passengers to Boston and to the Bay Colony; the ships which brought them; their English Homes, and the Places of their Settlement in Massachusetts. 1620-1640 By Charles Edward Banks Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Co., 1961. Pages 167-170.

Title: Jacobus, Ancient Families of New Haven Page: p. 624.

Title: History of Billerica, MA with as Genealogical Register Author: Rev. Henry A. Hazen Publication: A. Williams and Co., Old Corner Bookstore Boston, MA 1883 Page: p. 56.

Lineages of the Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. Vol. Two Author: Compiled by Bruce Campbell MacGunnigle, Dep. Gov. Abbrev: Ships List American Planters & Colonies.

American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) about William FRENCH Name: William FRENCH Birth Date: 1603 Birthplace: Eng, Massachusetts Volume: 58 Page Number: 484 Reference: Gen. Column of the ” Boston Transcript”. 1906-1941.( The greatest single source of material for gen. Data for the N.E. area and for the period 1600-1800. Completely indexed in the Index.): 15 May 1901, 4703; 19 Jun 1901, 4929; 7 Apr 1902, 5437; 7 Sep 1904, 7445; 7 May 1906, 8543; 11 Jun 1906, 8154; 13 Aug 1906, 8659; 28 Nov 1906, 8904; 16 Jan 1907, 8904; 30 Jan 1907, 8904; 20 Feb 1907, 8904; 6 Mar 1907, 8904; 20 Mar 1907, 9184; 10 Apr 1907, 9184; 6 May 1907, 8904; 3 May 1909, 8904; 19 May 1909, 516; 21 Feb 1910, 881; 6 Apr 1910, 1217; 18 Apr 1910, 1217; 17 Aug 1910, 1504; 11 Jan 1915, 4441; 29 Sep 1915, 4996; 25 Oct 1915, 4996; 1 Mar 1922, 632

The History of Boston, Massachusetts.

The history of the old town of Derby, Connecticut, 1642-1880  By Samuel Orcutt

 

Alice Gridley

1735-1821

Alice Gidley

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Alice Gridley (Henry 3, Hezekiah2, Henry1 ) was born at Dartmouth, Bristol, MA, on 9 September 1735. She was the daughter of Henry Gidley and Elizabeth Sherman. She married Samuel Mosher at Dartmouth, Bristol, MA, on 27 October 1763. She died at Providence, Saratoga, NY, on 28 May 1821, Age 85y 08m 08d. . Her body was interred at Woodward Cemetery, Saratoga County New York, USA. Or Hagadorns Mills Cemetery (Providence) Saratoga County

 

Children of Alice Gidley and Samuel Mosher are:

 

  1. Elizabeth Mosher b. 2 Nov 1766, d. 23 Sep 1848
  2. Abigail Mosher b. 5 May 1768, d. 10 Oct 1848
  3. Ruth Mosher b. 1770, d. 18 Mar 1847
  4. Alice Mosher b. 17 Mar 1772, d. 13 Oct 1812
  5. Samuel Mosher Jr. b. 10 Aug 1774, d. 16 Apr 1854
  6. Esther Mosher b. 28 Sep 1775, d. 10 Jan 1840

 

 

1790’s Fashion

 

http://saratoganygenweb.com/Bixby_Providence.html

 

Henry Gidley

Immigrant Ancestor

– 1678

Henry Gidley

Hezekia Gidley

Henry Gidley

Alice Gidley

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Henry (1) was (possibly) born in Devonshire, England. He married Joane (Unknown), married Mary,  and died Oct. 22, 1678.

 

Henry is (possibly) from Devonshire, England. The name Gidley perhaps first arose from the appelation "of Gidleigh," a parish in Devon. The name Henry Gidley appears often in Buckfastleigh parish registers in the IGI. However, not all Devon parish records have been input into the IGI. Unfortunately, the Devon probate records were destroyed in 1942, so making the correct identification of our Henry Gidley, if indeed he did come from Devon, may be difficult. There was no marriage of Henry and Joan in the Buckfastleigh registers.

Vital Records of Chelmsford [Deaths] GIDLY, Henry, Oct. 22, 1678

History of Chelmsford, Mass. By The REV. WILSON WATERS, M. A., B. D. :pp. 40-41

 

"This was the road over 'which the Groton people passed in going to Boston. All of this road which lies in Chelmsford is still in use, although upon some parts of it the travel is very limited. Another road started on the south side of Robins hill and, passing around on the west side of the hill and into the road above described, at what is now John Byam's place. The description given in the records of this is: 'Ith: 8: month :: 1673: Laid out by the selectmen the Day above for the use of the Town a high-way which is Bounded Between Henry Gidleys Lott and John Blanchards meadow and so all a Long between the meadow and Robbins hill Runing into the way that coms from George Biams to the meeting hous' This road accommodated Thomas Barrett, who had come from Braintree with his father, Thomas, and bought, ten years before, a house and land on the south side of Robins hill, where C. W. Byam now lives. Henry Gidley may have lived at the Wm. Fay place, although there are marks of one or two old cellars on that road, over one of which his house may have stood."

pp. 89-90
"The following powder account of 1674 is found in the Town Records, and shows the names of Chelmsford's able-bodied men at that time.An act of Powder sould to the inhabitants of Chelmsford the 1 Day of september, 1674.
...
henry Gidly 1 6"

Children of Henry Gidley and Joane (Unknown) are:

 

  1. 1.  Hezekiah GIDLEY b. 16 May 1663 Boston, MA Death* bef 14 Feb 1664
  2. Hezekiah Gidley  b. 14 Feb 1664, Boston, Suffolk Co., MA son of Henry Gidley  ( – >1670)  and Joane ?d. bef 1705 m. Annis/A
  3. Temperance Gidley

 

Children of Henry Gidley and Mary (Unknown) are:

 

  1. 1.  Patience Gidley Born 13 Oct 1670 Boston, MA

 

Boston births, baptisms, marriages, and deaths 1630-1699. (n.p.: n.pub.,
1978, reprint).
Sherman, Roy V. Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman. (1968)
Vital Records of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, to the Year 1850 (Boston, MA:
NEHGS, 1929).
Bristol Co., MA, Wills (Samuel Sherman names daughter Elizabeth Gidley and son-in-law Henry Gidley)

 

Henry Gidley

1693-1773

Henry Gidley

Alice Gidley

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Henry Gidley (Hezekiah2, Henry1) was born 5 Apr 1692, Boston, Suffolk Co, MA. Henry was the son of Hezekiah Gidley (1664 – <1705) and Annis/Agnes. He died 1773, Dartmouth, MA.  Henry married Elizabeth Sherman. (b. 1 Mar 1703, Dartmouth, MA d. abt 1767) Burial: Apponagansett Friends Cemetery Dartmouth Bristol County Massachusetts, USA
Children of Henry Gidley and Elizabeth Sherman are:

 

  1. Hezekiah Gidley
  2. Hannah Gidley
  3. Agnes Gidley
  4. John Gidley
  5. Henry Jr. Gidley
  6. Elizabeth Gidley
  7. Abigail Gidley
  8. Alice Gidley b. 9 Sep 1738, d. 28 May 1824

 

Hezekiah Gidley

1664 – Before 1705

Hezekia Gidley

Henry Gidley

Alice Gidley

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hezekiah Gidley (Henry1)was born 14 Feb 1664 in Boston, MA to Henry Gidley and Joane (Unknown). He married Ann/Anness or Agnes before 05 Apr 1692. Hezekiah died before 1705.

 

The Mysterious Anness

“Possible second marriage for Anness: 1)Jonathan Spooner married Anness GIDLEE on 17 Apr 1705 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA. Anness was born about 1681. 2) JONATHAN SPOONER, b. August 28, 1681, Plymouth , Plymouth, MA8; d. April 13, 17118; m. ANNESS GIDLOO, April 17, 17058. Annes Gidlee m. Jonathan Spooner Apr 17 1705 Dartmouth MA”

”Could this be the Annice b. 17 Nov 1665 Boston parents Samuel & Mercy Bradstreet?  Lots of info on that family but nothing on what happened to Annice. I did not find another Annis from that period of time but I don’t know she was born in Boston either. Samuel Bradstreet b. 13 Jan 1641/2 m. Mercy Tang d. 6 Sep 1670 (C: Elizabeth Jan 29 1663, Annice 19 Nov 1665, Mary May 1666, Ann 3 Sep, Henry)”

Annes Gidlee who married Jonathon Spooner Apr 17 1705 Dartmouth may have been Henry’s mother’s second marriage.

NOTES FOR HEZEKIAH GIDLEY:
History of Chelmsford, Mass.
By The REV. WILSON WATERS, M. A., B. D.

p. 413

Richard Stratton Appell’. i stratum ve On Appeal from the

oTdtey. Hezekiah Gidley defend’. [ Judgem’- of the 1 County Court at

Charlstowne in december 1691. where sd Hezekiah Gidley sued sd. Stratton for illegally possessing himselfe of an house & land in Chelmsford &c which of right belonged to sd Gidley’s father & wch. he dyed seized of as his owne proper real Estate &c and recovered Judgem’. ag’. the Appell’. Title to ye land in controversy & costs of Court. The Courts Judgem’. Reasons of Appeale & Evidences in the Case were read & coffiitted to ye Jury The Jury find for the defend’. Confirmation of ye former Judgem’. & costs of Courts allowed two pounds eight shillings ten pence. Execution issued for Costs March. 25. 1692

Child of Hezekiah Gidley and Anness:

  1. 1.  Henry Gidley Born 05 Apr 1692 Boston, MA Marriage ca. 1720 Elizabeth SHERMAN (1703- ), daughter of Samuel SHERMAN and Hannah

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA369&lpg=PA369&dq=%22Hezekiah+Gidley%22&sig=c7gXpecxOqsqgN2aRPN40wR4N0M&ei=vNKnTLDgDMuhnAedmpC4DQ&ct=result&id=c70VAQAAIAAJ&ots=6P-vaNZnSU#v=onepage&q=%22Hezekiah%20Gidley%22&f=false

Boston births, baptisms, marriages, and deaths 1630-1699. (n.p.: n.pub.,
1978, reprint).
Sherman, Roy V. Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman. (1968)
Vital Records of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, to the Year 1850 (Boston, MA:
NEHGS, 1929).
Bristol Co., MA, Wills (Samuel Sherman names daughter Elizabeth Gidley and
son-in-law Henry Gidley)

David Hager

1712-1769

Immigrant Ancestor

Co-Founder of Hagarstown, MD

 

David Hager

Dorothea Hager

Elizabeth Kiesecker

Sara Tice

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

David (1) was born in 1712 in Siegen, Wittgenstein, Heidelberg, Germany. He married Katharina Kerschner. He died Aug 1769 Elisabeth’s-town, Frederick Co, MD, and

is buried in Salem Ref Ch Cmty, Hagerstown, MD

 

When he immigrated is not known, but he was not listed on the 1736 ship ‘s manifest with his younger brother Jonathan. It is believed he came over in 1739 to bring Jonathan back, having been sent to America by his mother for that purpose.

 

In 1748-1769, he was living near his brother Jonathan in Hagerstown, MD. Although his brother Jonathan was given credit for founding Hagerstown, David should also get at least some credit. He and Jonathan together put the town on the map, but there are three reasons that Jonathan gets the most credit — (1) Jonathan got there first, by a couple of years, (2) David died early, before the official founding of the town, and Jonathan was left to continue the building process, and (3) the town was initially called “Elisabeths’ Town”, after Jonathan’s wife. In 1776, Jonathan Hager became known as the “Father of Washington County” after his many efforts finally secured Hagerstown becoming the county seat of newly created Washington County, Maryland which Hager had also helped create from neighboring Frederick County

 

In 1758, David was appointed as the Overseer of Roads for all of the main roads of Salisbury Hundred to the southwest side that leads from Bakers to Stulls. In 1766, he received from his brother Jonathan 229 acres of his “Haeger ‘s Delight” near Elisabethstown which became called “Brother’s Good Will” (near today’s Middleburg). David was a sickly man, and indeed died fairly young (57). Jonathan reportedly gave him the land to pass on to his children, which he did a few years later when, in 1769, he died at the age of 57 from poisoning from a war wound.

 

The only war I can find that was going on in the area was The First Pennamite War.

Early Settlers & the Yankee-Pennamite Wars

The Wyoming Valley was part of the land granted under the Connecticut Charter by King Charles II of England in 1662 to Connecticut for new settlements. On December 28, 1768, the Susquehanna Company in a meeting at Harford, Connecticut made arrangements for the settling the Wyoming Valley lands. Plans were made to divide the territory into five townships, each five miles square. Each township would provide enough land for forty settlers and their families. These five townships were later named Plymouth, Kingston, Hanover, Wilkes-Barre, and Pittston.

When the settlers arrived in Plymouth, they found the land occupied by other settlers from the colony of Pennsylvania. It seemed that King Charles II had granted charters to both Connecticut and Pennsylvania at different times. The King knew very little about America and maps were very poor at that time. Both groups claimed the land. But who was the rightful owner? The Connecticut Charter was granted first in 1662, while the Pennsylvania Charter was not granted until 1681. Fighting soon broke out.

His brother Jonathan was the executor of David’s estate. A widow and six children are mentioned. He is buried on that part of his farm which became the cemetery for the Salem Reformed Church, about four miles northwest of Hagerstown. The church burial record shows him as “Mr. Hager”.

 

Of his children, only Elisabeth settled in the Hagerstown area. Some of his grandchildren came back to Hagerstown later.

 

Children

 

  1. David Hager, Jr. b: AFT 1739 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  2. Maria Katharina Hager b: 1 DEC 1740 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  3. Johannes “John” Hager  b: 1742 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  4. Johann Michael Hager b: 1743 in Hagerstown, Washington (Frederick) Co, MD
  5. Elisabeth Hager b: 1749 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  6. Susannah Pauline Hager b: ABT 1750 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  7. Dorothea Hager b: ABT 1751 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  8. Sarah Katharina Hager b: ABT 1759 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD

 

http://genforum.genealogy.com/hagar/

 

Dorothea Hager

Abt. 1751- Aft. 1830

 

Dorothea Hager

Elizabeth Kiesecker

Sara Tice

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

 

Born about 1751 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD, Dorothea (David1) was the daughter of David Hager and Katharina Kerschner. Dorothea married Philip Kiesecker, Jr. She died after 1830, and was buried in St. John’s Lutheran Church Cemetery (old) Hagerstown, MD.

 

Children of Philip Kiesecker, Jr and Dorthea Hager are:

 

  1. Elizabeth Kiesecker b. 1773 Married John Tice 

 

 

Ellen Harrison

1621-1690

Immigrant Ancestress

 

Ellen Harrison

Mary Thompson

Sarah Cooper

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Ellen Harrison (Richard1) was born 24 Apr 1621 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England to Richard Harrison and Margaret Picke. She married John Thompson, (born 1613) on  25 Feb 1650 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She died 8 Apr 1690 at the age of 68 in New Haven, Connecticut.

 

Children  of John Thompsonand Ellen Harrison are:

 

1.        Mary Thompson  Born: 24 APR 1652 in New Haven, CT Died: NOV 1714 in New Haven, CT Spouses: Samuel Lines; John Hitchcock; Samuel Clark
2.        Hannah)Anna Thompson Born: 22 SEP 1654 Died: 26 OCT 1718 Spouses: Abraham Bradley
3.        Elizabeth Thompson Born: 03 JUN 1657 Died: 03 NOV 1718 Spouses: Benjamin Bradley
4.        Lydia Thompson Born: 13 MAR 
5.        Sarah Thompson Born: 25 MAR 1667 Died: 1669

 

 Richard Harrison

1595-1653

Immigrant Ancestor

Richard Harrison

Ellen Harrison

Mary Thompson

Sarah Cooper

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Name Richard Harrison, (1), was born 31 Mar 1595 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England. He was the son of Richard Harrison and Ellen (Unknown). Richard married Margaret Picke/Pickett 28 Jul 1619 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England. Richard died 25 Oct 1653 at the age of 58 in Brandford, New Haven Co., Connecticut.

          

The children of Margaret Picke and Richard Harrison are:

 

  1. Richard Harrison was born 1620 and died 1686.
  2. Ellen Harrison was Christened 1 27 Dec 1621 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England. She died Dec 1621 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England and was buried 2 28 Dec 1621 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England.
  3. Margaret Harrison was born 1624 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England. She died 1 Apr 1627 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England and was buried 20 Apr 1627 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England.
  4. Elizabeth Harrison was Christened 21 May 1626 and died after 5 Nov 1675.
  5. Ensign Thomas Harrison was Christened 2 Dec 1627 and Died 1704.
  6. Ellen Harrison was Blessed 25 Mar 1630 birth place West Kirby, Cheshire, England and died 8 Apr 169024 Apr 1621
  7. Samuel Harrison was born 1632 and died 1705.
  8. Mary Harrison was born 1634.

 

Mary Harvey

1605-Aft 1668

Immigrant Ancestress

Founding Family of Stratford, CT

Mother of Twelve

Mary Harvey

Joseph Beardsley

Thomas Beardsley

Mary Beardsley

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Born June 5, 1605 in England, Mary Harvey (1) (Harvie) was the daughter of Richard Harvie and Ellen (“Helena”) Elliott. She married William Beardlsey 26 June 1631 in England. Mary died after 1668 in Stratford, Connecticut. Burial:Union Cemetery

 

William Beardsley and his wife Mary Harvey were natives of England and were married there. They were members of the church of the Reverend Adam Blackman. Together with his congregation and their small children, they emigrated on the good ship Planter.  They resided briefly in Massachusetts before removing to Connecticut. They became the founders of Stratford, Connecticut in 1639. William is thought to have originally come from Stratford-on-Avon in England and may have been responsible for  naming the town Stratford, Connecticut.

 

Children of William Beardlsey and Mary Harvey were:

 

1.        Mary Beardlsey Born: 1631/1636   at: Stratford-on-Avo, (Warwickshire), England    Died: 20 Sep 169 at: Hadley, Hamps., Mass  Spouses: Thomas Welles  (Wells),  Samuel Belden
  1. John Beardlsey b. 1632 in England d. 19 Nov 1718 in Stratford, CT.
  2. Joseph Beardlsey b. abt. 1634 in England d, 29 May 1712 in Stratford, CT.
  3. Samuel Beardlsey b. avt 1640 in Stratford, CT. d. 24 Dec. 1706 in Stratford, CT.
  4. Sarah Beardlsey b. abt. 1639 in Stratford, CT.
  5. Hannah Beardlsey b. 1642 in Hatfield, Hampshire, Ma  d. 23 Feb 1679
  6. Daniel Beardlsey b. 1644 in Stratford, Fairfield, Conn.
  7. David Beardlsey
  8. Thomas Beardlsey b.1646 in Stratford, Fairfield, Conn.
  9. Ruth Beardlsey b.abt 1648 in Stratford, Fairfield, Conn.
  10. William Beardlsey
  11. Rebecca Beardlsey b. abt 1649 in Stratford, Fairfield, Conn.  D. 17  Feb 1739 in Woodbury, Conn.

 

Clifford L. Stott, “The Correct English Origins of Nathaniel Dickinson and William Gull, Settlers of Wethersfield and Hadley,” The New England Historical and Genealogical Register 152(1998)159-78 at 167-72.

Unknown author, Family Group Sheets, SLC Archives.

Unknown author, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, by Clarence Almon Torrey., 3rd Supplement, p. 21.

 

Sarah Hart

1625/26-1697

Immigrant Ancestress

Mother of Fourteen Children

Sarah Hart

Mary Porter

Thomas Royce

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Sarah Hart (Steven1), of Farmington, the eldest child of Deacon Stephen Hart and Elizabeth Symons was born in England in 1625/26. She married, Nov. 20th, 1644, Thomas Porter in Hartford, CT.. Sarah died in 1697 in Farmington, CT.

 

Thomas Porter lived on the lot adjacent to her father’s property, a part of which has remained in the family, and was, in 1844, occupied by his descendant, Timothy Porter. They joined the church in 1653, and many of their descendants have been deacons, and some of them clergymen, among the latter, Ebenezer Porter, D. D., President of Andover Theological Seminary.

 

Children of Sarah Hart and Thomas Porter are:

 

  1. Thomas Porter, b. 1645, Farmington, CT, died 27 Mar 1711, North Kingston, Washington, RI, spouse Louis Stanley.
  2. Sarah Porter, b. 1646, Farmington, CT, died 7 Oct 1725, spouse Nathaniel Winchell.
  3. Samuel Porter, b. 1648 Farmington.
  4. Dorothy Porter, b. 1652, Farmington, Hartford, CT
  5. Johannah Porter, b. 6 Jan 1655, Farmington, Hartford, CT, spouse Stephen Taylor, m. 8 Nov 1676 in Hartford, Hartford, CT.
  6. Samuel Porter, b. 1656, spouse Martha Freeman.
  7. Ruth Porter, b. 1658, Hartford, Hartford, CT, spouse Samuel Smith.
  8. Rachel Porter, b. 26 Dec 1658, Farmington, Hartford, CT, died 4 Oct 1743, Kensington, Hartford, CT, spouse Samuel Cowles.
  9. Mary Porter, b. 1662, Wallingford, New Haven, CT, spouse Joseph Royce, m. 1 Oct 1684, Wallingford, CT.
  10. Ruth Porter, b. 30 Nov 1664, Farmington, Hartford, CT, died 1739, spouse Samuel Smith, spouse Joseph Root.
  11. Samuel Porter, b. 24 Oct 1665, Farmington, Hartford, CT, died 25 Mar 1736, spouse Martha Freeman, spouse Abigail Humphreys.
  12. Martha Porter, b. 1666, died 11 July 1749, spouse Joseph North.
  13. Elizabeth Porter, b. 23 Oct 1667, Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, spouse William Frampton, m. 27 July 1688.
  14. Mary Porter, b. 22 Feb 1677, Stratford, Fairfield, CT, died 11 Mar 1759, Meriden, New Haven, CT, spouse Joseph Royce, spouse Deacon Robert Royce, spouse Joseph Langdon.

 

 

Steven Hart

Abt. 1605-1693

Immigrant Ancestor

Steven Hart

Sarah Hart

Mary Porter

Thomas Royce

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Stephen Hart was born about 1605, in Braintree, in Essex County, Eng. He married Elizabeth Symons. She died, and secondly he married Margaret Farmington (Abt 1607-1693), the widow of Arthur Smith. He had no children by his second wife. She survived Deacon Hart, and was admitted to the church in Farmington, March 17th, 1690-1. He died in 1693.

Deacon Hart and his first wife were constituent members of the church in Farmington, organized November, 1652, with Rev. Roger Newton pastor. Mr. Hart had been deacon of Rev. Thomas Hooker’s church, at Cambridge, Mass., and at Hartford, Conn. He was one of the fifty-four settlers at Cambridge, Mass., was a proprietor at Hartford in 1639, and became one of the eighty-four proprietors of Farmington in 1672. In 1647 he was one of the “deputyes” of the General Court of Connecticut, at their May session. In 1653 he was appointed a Commissioner, by the General Court, for the town of Farmington, to aid the constable in impressing men into the army, then being raised.

Stephen Hart is supposed to have come from Braintree, Essex County, England, with the company that settled Braintree, Mass., and subsequently removed to Newtown, since called Cambridge, and constituted the church of which Rev. Thomas Hooker was invited from England to become their pastor. He was in Cambridge in 1632, and admitted a freeman there, May 14th, 1634. He came to Hartford with Mr. Hooker’s company in 1635, and was one of the original proprietors of that place.

In Hartford, his house-lot was on the west side of what is now called Front Street, near where Morgan Street crosses it, and there is a tradition that the town was called from the ford he discovered and used in crossing the Connecticut River at a low stage of the water, and so from Hart’s Ford it soon became Hartford, from a natural and easy transition. Tradition further says that as he and others were on a hunting excursion on Talcott Mountain, they discovered the Farmington River Valley, then inhabited by the Tunxis, a powerful tribe of Indians. The meadows were probably then cleared, and waving with grass and Indian corn. Such lands were then much needed and coveted by the settlers, who soon – probably as soon as 1640 – made a bargain with the Indians, and settled among them with their cattle. They still continued, however, connected with the settlement at Hartford, attended public worship, and prehaps wintered there. until about 1645, when the town was incorporated by the name of Farmington, from the excellent farms there.*

About this time Mr. Roger Newton, a student in theology with Rev. Thomas Hooker, whose daughter he married, began to preach for them, and in 1652 was ordained their pastor. Stephen Hart was one of the seven pillars of the church, and was chosen their first deacon. The other pillars were Rev. Roger Newton, pastor, John Cole (Cowles), John Bronson, Robert Porter, Thomas Judd, and Thomas Thompson.

Stephen Hart appears to have taken the lead in the settlement among the Indians in Farmington, and purchased a large tract on the boarder of the present town of Avon, and known to this day by the name of Hart’s Farm.** He was one of the first representatives in 1647, and continued, with one exception, for fifteen sessions, until 1655, and once in 1660. In short, no man in the town was more active, influential, and useful. His house-lot in Farmington, which was four or five times as large as any other, was on the west side of Main Street, in the village, opposite the meeting-house, and contained fifteen acres, extending from Mill Lane to the stone store south. This large house-lot was granted to Deacon Stephen Hart as an inducement to erect and continue a mill on the premises, to be perpetuated and kept in motion. The mill was erected originally by the Bronsons, to whom, as a consideration, was granted, viz: a tract of eighty acres, on the Pequabuk River, now known as the “Eighty Acre.” The south part of this house-lot he gave to his son John, and the north part to his son Thomas.

Thomas gave it to his son Josiah, and it descended to the wife of Roger Hooker, his only surviving child, and to her only son, Thomas Hart Hooker, who sold it to Samuel Deming. The Demings and their descendants hold it to this day-1874. These lots and lands, in some respects, are the most desirable and valuable of any in the old town of Farmington.

He was a representative to the General Court of Connecticut in 1647, and most of the succeeding years to 1660, from the town of Farmington. His widow, Margaret, gave her property to her sons, John and Arthur Smith, and daughter, Elizabeth Thompson. She had grand chidren-Elizabeth, John, and Ann Thompson.

Deacon Hart’s will was dated March 16th, 1682-3. He mentions the farm he formerly gave his three sons, John, Stephen, and Thomas, viz: one-half to John, one-fourth to Steven, and one-fourth to Thomas.

Item.-I give my grandson, Thomas Porter, and my son-in-law, John Cole, my plow and and meadow swamp, which was some time Andrew Warner’s farm, abuts on my son Steven, their agreement to my be loved wife being fulfilled.
Item.-I give my sons, Steven and Thomas, and my daughters, Sarah Porter and Mary Lee, my Swamp Lot in the Great Swamp,*** and all my uplands to be equally divided between them.
Item.-I give my grandchild, Dorothy Porter, £10.
Item.-I give my grandchild, John Lee, £3.
Item.-I give my grandchild, John Hart, my eldest son’s son, £3.
Item.-I give my beloved wife, &c.

The Inventory was taken by Thomas Hart, and John Hart, Selectmen.

Isaac Moore, and Benjamin Judd, Appraisers. Taken March 31st, 1682-3.

Amount, £340 48. House and homestead, £70; land at Nod, east of river; £40.

 

Deacon Hart was a farmer and large land-holder, located in the village of Farmington, and was a man of great influence, and a leading character. He died March, 1682-3, aged 77 years.

[ The following gives the modern, and better accepted story of how Hartford was named. This was sent by Kathleen Baker.

This is from a talk by Dr. Albert E. Van Dusen given at a meeting of the Connecticut Genealogy Society, 20 Jun 1970, and printed by the Society in their Ct Nutmegger, Vol 3 pg 355-373. Rev Thomas Hooker and Thomas Stone lead a group from Massachusetts Bay Colony to Ct “with a purpose to settle upon the delightful banks of Connecticut River.” They had about 100 people in the party and 160 head of cattle, plus goats and swine. “There exist several theories about where they crossed the Ct River”. “They called their settlement Newtown on the Connecticut River and then later changed it to Hartford. We think this was done because Thomas Stone, who was Hooker’s second in command had come from Hertford, England (pronounced just the way we do Hartford)”. Hartford was the last of 3 original towns settled, Windsor was first, then Wethersfield, and Hartford in 1636. Saybrook was considered a seperate Colony from the others. There were chosen 8 men to serve as officals of Hartford; Roger Ludlow, William Phelps, John Steele, William Westwood, Andrew Ward, William Pynchon, Henry Smith, and William Swain. Pynchon also established a small settlement up river at Springfield as part of the Ct settlement, but separated from the Hartford group, they didn’t like the way he traded with the natives.

Dr Van Dusen is author of the book entitled, “Conecticut”, published in 1961, a fully illustrated history of the state from the Seventeenth Century to the present, as well as of numerous articles and book reviews. ]

The Children of Stephen Hart and Elizabeth Symons are:

 

  1. Sarah Hart, b. in England in 1625/26. m. Nov. 20th, 1644, m.Thomas Porter,  in Hartford, CT. d. in 1697 in Farmington, CT.
  2. Mary Hart, married John Lee; second, Jan. 5th, 1672, Jedediah Strong.
  3. John Hart, married Sarah
  4. Steven Hart wife not known.
  5. Mehitabel Hart, married John Cole.
  6. Thomas Hart, born1648, married Ruth Hawkins

[ In the book, “The Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633,” Volume I, A-F, (by Robert Charles Anderson, Published by Great Migration Study Project, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995) reports on Dea. Stephen’s possible daughters, Rachel and Mehitabel are discussed. The report in the book presents a strong argument that the information about Mehitable above is incorrect. There was no daughter named Mehitabel, but instead Stephen had a daughter named Rachel:

“The son-in-law John Cole named in the will of Stephen Hart is stated in some sources to have married a daughter Mehitable Hart [Bassett Gen 391; Flagg 258]. but evidence taken largely from the Winthrop medical records shows that John Cole of Farmington instead married Rachel, daughter of Stephen Hart. In late November 1657 John Winthrop Jr. treated “Rachell Hart of Farmington” and “Steven Hart her brother,” and on 1 February 1657/8 he treated “Rachel Hart 16 years” [WMJ 58, 85]. She was a frequent patient throughout 1658 and 1659, being treated for an eye problem as a result of which she intermittently lost her sight [WM 98, 115, 151]. Beginning on 12 December 1664 John Winthrop Jr. began frequent treatments of Rachel Cole, wife of John Cole of Farmington, for eye problems and head pains [WMJ 579, 608, 611, 624, 637, 646, 653, 725, 909]. In his will of 12 September 1689 “John Coale Sr. of Farmington made a bequest to “my beloved wife Rachel,” and asked Thomas Hart and Thomas Porter to be overseers [Manwaring 1:426-27]; Thomas Hart was sister of Rachel Hart, and Thomas Porter had married her elder sister, Sarah. John and Rachel (Hart) Cole had a son John who married in 1691 Mehitable Loomis, and this may be the source of the claim that Stephen Hart had a daughter Mehitable who married John Cole [Farmington LR 2:123]”

*The principal leaders in this settlement were John Steele, William Lewis, Stephen Hart, Thomas Judd, John Bronson, John Warner, Nathaniel Kellogg, Thomas Barnes, Richard Seymour, and Thomas Gridley.
** Probably located at or near what is now called Cider Brook, on the east side of the river, and near the bridge, some three miles north of Farmington Village.

***The Great Swamp means Kensington Parish, now part of Berlin.

 

George Hill(s)

1578-1649

Immigrant Ancestor

George Hill

Margery Hill

Hannah Morgan

Nehemiah Royce

Thomas Royce

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

George Hill (1) was the son of Joseph Hills And Sarah Smith . He was born on 20 Nov 1578 in Great Barnstead, Billerica, Essex, England. He married  Mary (Unknown) Symonds, widow of William Symonds on 13 Oct 1596 in Great Barnstead, Billerica, England. George died on 24 Mar 1649 in Massachusetts at age 70.

 

The following is an exerpt from the Encyclopedia of Massachusetts, biographical–genealogical, Volume 4 By William Richard Cutter, American Historical Society. I do not know if it is the style that I am unused to, or if it is just confusing. It is hard to tell when he is talking about George the father and/or Joseph the son or George the descendant who was born in 1842. It is interesting that it states that Mary Symonds was the widow of William Seymour. Is it possible that Symonds was her maiden name after all?

HILL, George A.,Active in Community Affairs. (George A. Hill, son of Charles and Hannah F. (Hanson) Hill, was born at Derry, New Hampshire, March 6, 1842)

Joseph Hills, the immigrant ancestor of the family represented in the present generation by George A. Hill, the well known real estate dealer of Springfield and West Springfield, was born in the parish of Great Burnsted, Billerica, Essex, England, and the record of his baptism reads March, 1602. “Joseph Hills, the sonne of George, was baptized the third day.” He married Mary Symonds, of Billerica, County Essex, widow of William Seymour, October 13, 1596.

The earliest known record in relation to him is that of his marriage, — ” George Hilles, linen draper, and Mary Symonds, of Billericay, County Essex, widow of William Symonds, late of same, tanner, general license of the Bishop of London, 13 Oct. 1596.” An unfortunate break in the register of Great Burstead, all records between 1579 and 1596 being missing, will probably prevent the discovery of the maiden name and parentage of the wife of George Hills.

His son, Joseph Hills, married, July 22, 1624, Rose Clark. They resided in Great Burnsted, and there his elder children were born. Not later than March, 1632, the family removed to Maldon, later to County Essex, which was the birthplace of sons, John and Steven, and daughter, Sarah. In 1638, Joseph Hills came to America on the ship, “Susan and Ellen,” which arrived July 17 of that year at Boston in New England.

Children of   Mary (Unknown) Symonds and George Hill are:

 

  1. Sarah Hills
  2. Joseph Hills b.1602 at: Maldon, Essex, England Married at: Great Burstead, Billerica, Essex, EnglandDied: 5 Feb 1687/1688  at: Newbury, Ma Spouses: Rose Clark (Dunster)  Hannah Smith (Mellows)  Helen Atkinson  Ann
  3. John Hills Born: 15 Apr 1604 at: Great Barstead, Essex, England
  4. Abigail Hills b.1604at: Great Barstead, Essex, England
  5. John Hills b.16 Nov 1606 at: Billericay, Essex, England
  6. Rebecca Hills b.28 Feb 1607/1608 at: Great Barstead, Billericay, Essex, England
  7. Margery Hills b.Jun 16, 1611, Great Burstead, Essex, England , m. James Morgan 6 Aug 1640, in Roxbury, MA. D. 28 Apr 1690, Wallingford, New London, CT Martha Hills b.16 Jun 1611 at: Great Barstead, Billericay, Essex, Eng
  8. Abraham Hills b.14 Jun 1615  at: Great Barstead, Essex, England

 

Genealogical data relating to the ancestry and descendants of William Hills:

the English emigrant to New England in 1632 and of Joseph Hills, the English emigrant to New England in 1638    (Joseph Hills is the son of ancestors George and Mary)

 

 

Margery Hill

1610-1690

Immigrant Ancestress

Margery Hill

Hannah Morgan

Nehemiah Royce

Thomas Royce

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Margery Hill (George1 )was born Jun 16, 1611, Great Burstead, Essex, England to Mary (Unknown) Symonds and George Hill. She married James Morgan 6 Aug 1640, in Roxbury, MA. She died: 28 Apr 1690, Wallingford, New London, CT at age 79 She is buried at Smith Lake Cemetery Groton New London County Connecticut

 

Diary of Joshua Hempstead: 1 June 1712–“Goodwife Morgan Died Suddenly.” 2 June 1712–“I Sheered 4 Sheep

in ye morn & then went to Jno Morgans to & (sic) made a Coffin for his mother. I went to ye funerall & then came home…”

 
 

Children of Margery Hill and James Morgan are:

 

  1. Hannah MORGAN b.: 18 MAY 1642 at: Roxbury, Massachusetts Married: 20 NOV 1660 at: New London, Connecticut 1 d. 12 DEC 1706 at: Wallingford, Connecticut Spouses: Nehemiah ROYCE
  2. James MORGAN b. 3 MAR 1643/44    at: Connecticut m. NOV 1666 d.: BEF 22 JAN 1711/12at: Groton, Connecticut Spouses: Mary VINE
  3. John MORGAN b.30 MAR 1645 m.16 NOV 1665 at: prob. Connecticut d.1712 at: Preston, Connecticut Spouses: Rachel DEMING  Elizabeth JONES
  4. Joseph MORGAN b. 29 NOV 1646 at: Roxbury, Massachusetts m.26 APR 1670 at: New London, Connecticut  d. 5 APR 1704 at: Preston, Connecticut Spouses: Dorothy PARKE
  5. Abraham MORGAN b. 3 SEP 1648 d. AUG 1649
  6. Name: A daughter MORGAN   Born: 17 NOV 1650 died

 

SOURCES

1) Morgan Genealogy

.  G.B. Roberts & W.A. Reitwiesner.  1984.  American Ancestors and Cousins of the Princess of Wales.  Genealogical Publ. Co., Baltimore, MD, pp. 29-30.

2.  Lucius R. Paige. 1849.  “List of Freeman.” New England Historical and Genealogical Register.  3(2): 187-194.  On p. 190, citing Colonial Records, Vol. II, p. 27:  “James Morgan” made Freeman of the Massachusetts Colony on 10 May 1643.

3.  David Pulsifer.  1852.  “Early Records of Boston.” New England Historical and Genealogical Register  6(2): 183-184.  On p. 184:

Roxbury…

Hanna the daughter of James Morgan borne 18 (5) 1642.

4.  Henry E. Waite.  1884.  “Ten Generations in New England.” New England Historical and Genealogical Register 38(1): 56-57.  On p. 56.1 (large fold-out pedigree chart):  James Morgan, s/o James Morgan and Margery Hill, h/o Mary Vine (with line of descent to Mary Johnson, w/o Otis Waite).

5.  Anon.  1934.  Obituary: Edwin Denison Morgan (1854-1933). New England Historical and Genealogical Register 88(1): 76-77.  On p. 76:

[Edwin Denison Morgan] traced his descent from James Morgan, a native of wales, who emigrated to Boston in 1636 but later moved to New London and settled at Groton, Conn., was nine times a deputy to the General Court between 1657 and 1670, and died at Groton in 1685…

500 Families: Margery Hill of Roxbury, Mass.
IGI: Margery Hill, born about 1610, Great Barstead, Billercay, Essex, England.

 

.

Edward Hitchcock

1614-Abt.1657/58

English Immigrant

Baptized by Rev. John Davenport

Edward Hitchcock

Mary Hitchcock

John Russell

William B. Russell

Nicholas Russell

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Edward Hitchcock was born December 15, 1614 in possibly Alcannings or Marelborough, Wiltshire, England to (some sources say) John Hitchcock (or, Hiscockes) and Mary Franklin; Edward was married first by Feb. 1638 to Mary (Unknown) (b. Abt. 1613), and second, married on May 20, 1656 at Branford, New Haven Co., CT to Frances (Unknown). Edward died  Nov. 23, 1658, New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.

 

Edward Hitchcock came to America either with his two brothers, Luke and Mattius, or took a different ship. He took freeman’s oath in New Haven in company with Luke Hitchcock July 1, 1644.

 

The following exerpt from:

The genealogy of the Hitchcock family:

who are descended from Matthias Hitchcock of East Haven, Conn. and Luke Hitchcock of Wethersfield, Conn

 

 

Edward Hitchcock son of ______ _______b._______ ; m. 1st, (wife) as early as 1638 since the birth of his first child Mary was recorded in New Haven in 1639; m. 2d, (wife) May 20, 1656, at Branford, Ct., (to) Frances, widow of John Ingland of England, who had died Nov. 30, 1655, leaving no children. From Mr. Judd’s manuscript, ” After the death of Edward which occurred probably in the latter part of 1657, his widow married, Sept., 1663, Thomas Johnson, by whom she had one son Thomas, b. July II, 1664. Edward was in New Haven in 1643, when he was bapt. by the Rev. John Davenport in right of his wife, Dec. 15, 1644.” He in company with Luke Hitchcock took the freeman’s oath July 1, 1644.

From the records of the colony and plantation of New Haven from 1638 to 1649: ” Edward Hitchcock fined for want of flint, Jan. 4, 1643.” ” Nov. 2, 1642, Ct., ordered that Matthew Hitchcock shall either pay 20 s. to Mr. Perry, which he undertook in the behalf of his brother, or else sell so much of his brother’s goods as will satisfie the said debt.”

HIS CHILDREN WERE :

i. Mary, b. Feb. 2, 1639; m. Oct. 12, 1663, Ralph Russel. He d.,
in 1679, when she m. 2d, Dec. 29, 1679, John Potter as his
second wife,
ii. John, b. 1643.
iii. Samuel, b. Sept. 22, 1646.
iv. Joseph, bapt. Jan. 16, 1648; did not share in the distribution of his father’s estate; probably died before his father.

v. Abigail.

From Colonial Records of New Hacen, 1114!)-1662. ” Court held Jan. 4, 1658. Inventory of the estate of Edward Hitchcock deceased, taken Nov. 28, 1658, attested by the widow Frances. Deacon Miles and John Cooper took oath that the inventory was just, etc. The widow says that something tending to the nature of a will was expressed to Matthias Hitchcock and Edward Patterson a little before his death.”

” Ct. held April 5, 1659. Frances, widow of Edward Hitchcock, with Matthias Hitchcock and Edward Patterson, testify that Edward Hitchcock when sick, said he intended to give his wife’s kinswoman Elizabeth Perry, a childs part. Ct. so ordered.”

“Ct. held May 3, 18.59. John and Samnel, sons of Edward H— deceased, propounded for liberty to choose their guardian. John, the eldest, nominated Samnel Andrews, but the Court advised him to take advise of Deacon Miles and of Ensign Linden and of any other of his friends in this matter. Samnel was thought not to be at age, therefore the case concerning both of them was respited until another time.”

” Ct. held May 11, 1659. On testimony of Frances, widow of Edward Hitchcock, as tocbange in estate, a new inventory was taken, amount £185-10s-9d. Deacon Miles appraiser, testified as to correctuess etc. Property divided among the widow, Frances, John, the eldest son, whose share was by his consent committed to Ensign Lindon ; Mary, eldest dau., Abigail, whose share was at her desire entrusted to Sergeant Munson ; Samuel was not of age to choose a guardian, and his share remains under the care of the Court: and Elizabeth Perry, a Kinswoman of the widow.”

Children of Edward Hitchcock and Mary Unknown are:

 

  1. Mary Hitchcock b. Feb. 2, 1638 married first Ralph Russell, and second Sgt. John Potter, Jr.;
  2. John Hitchcock b, 1643
  3. Samuel Hitchcock b. Sept. 22, 1646
  4. Joseph Hitchcock bapt. Jan. 16, 1648, likely died young
  5. Abigail Hitchcock

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA480&lpg=PA479&dq=%22edward%20Hitchcock%22%20Mary%20%221658%22&sig=cijrMbof4pkdHRG9lg0GqRgOT4Q&ei=1xrTTNWPKpKqngfp5Yn4Dw&ct=result&id=lBjPAAAAMAAJ&ots=hP6FwmlmW2&output=text

 

Mary Hitchcock

1638- Aft. 1679

Mary Hitchcock

John Russell

William B. Russell

Nicholas Russell

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary was born 02 Feb 1638, the daughter of Edward Hitchcock and Mary UnknownMary Hitchcock married Ralph Russell 12 Oct 1663 in New Haven, CT. She married Sgt. John Potter, Jr. 23 DEC 1679, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.

 

Children of Ralph Russell and Mary Hitchcock are:
  1. John Russell, B. 14 Dec 1664 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut,m. Hannah Moulthrop on 17 Aug 1687 in East Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, d. 3 Feb 1724 in East Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.
2.        Joseph Russell, B. 20 Mar 1667.
3.        Samuel Russell, B. 1671; D. 26 Jun 1724.
4.        Edward Russell, B. Feb 1673.

Children of Mary Hitchcock and John Potter are:

1.        Abigail Potter b. 1680

 

Jane Holmes

-1711

Jane Holmes

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Jane Holmes (Judah1) was the daughter of Judah Holmes, and her mother was unknown. Jane and John Alling had an illegitimate child, Mary Alling. John was married to someone else. Jane married William Wooding (b: 16 NOV 1651 in New Haven, New Haven, CT) on 26 JUN 1695 in New Haven, New Haven, CT. She died in 1711.

 

Child of Jane Holmes and John Alling is:

 

  1. Mary Alling was born on 26 Aug. 1693 in New Haven m. Aaron Perkins, son of John Perkins and Mary in New Haven. Mary died in 1784 at the age of 91.

 

Children of Jane Holmes and William Wooding are:

  1. Sarah Wooding b: 5 APR 1696 in New Haven, New Haven, CT
  2. Elizabeth Wooding b: 11 DEC 1698 in New Haven, New Haven, CT
  3. Esther Wooding b: 29 JAN 1702 in New Haven, New Haven, CT
  4. William Wooding b: 28 MAR 1705 in New Haven, New Haven, CT
  5. Rebecca Wooding b: 1707

Sources:

Abbrev: Families of Ancient New Haven (Jacobus)
Title: Jacobus, Donald Lines, compiler, Families of Ancient New Haven [CT] (Baltimore, Genealogical Pub. Co., 1974)
Page: v. 8, p. 2013

Abbrev: Families of Ancient New Haven (Jacobus)
Title: Jacobus, Donald Lines, compiler, Families of Ancient New Haven [CT] (Baltimore, Genealogical Pub. Co., 1974)
Page: v. 4, p. 784; v. 8, p. 2013

Abbrev: Torrey – New England Marriages Prior to 1700
Title: Torrey, Clarence Almon with a revised introduction by Gary Boyd Roberts, New England Marriages Prior to 1700 (Baltimore, MD, Genealogical Pub. Co., 1985)
Page: p. 837

                                        Judah Holmes

 

Judah Holmes

Jane Holmes

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Father of Jane Holmes

 

Lived in New Haven, CT.

 

Elizabeth Holt

1608 -1683

Immigrant Ancestress

Eliabeth Holt

Alice Peck

Edward DeWolf

Hannah DeWolf

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

 Elizabeth Holt was born in England in 1608. She married William Peck in London, England in 1622. She died 5 Dec 1683, Lyme, New London, CT. and is buried at the Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, CT.

 

Children of Elizabeth Holt and William Peck are:

  1. Jeremiah Peck,  b. Jan 1621/2/3, London, England  d. 7 Jun 1699, Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  2. Alice Peck, born abt 1625/26 in England, died 1689 in Lyme, NL, CT, married Balthazar DeWolf abt 1645 in Guilford, CT
  3. Elizabeth Peck,   b. 15 Sep 1627, London, England m Unknown Andrews
  4. John Peck,   b. 17 Nov 1638,   d. 1725, Wallingford, New Haven, CT
  5. Joseph Peck,   b. 17 Jan 1640/1,   d. 25 Nov 1718

Other possible children: Eleazer Peck, Benjamin Peck

December 5, 1683: Elizabeth died at New Haven (New Haven) Connecticut.
“Effie Belle Randall of Bath, Ohio: her ancestors and descendants” by Theodore N. Woods; p. 81; published by T. N. Woods; Phoenix, Arizona; 1991 (CS71.R19 1991 LofC)
“A Genealogical Account of the Descendants in the Male Line of William Peck, one of the founders in 1638 of the Colony of New Haven, Connecticut” by Darius Peck; Bryan & Goeltz; Hudson, New York; 1877 (929.2 P3364P ACPL)

1622: William Peck married Elizabeth, surname unknown.
“Effie Belle Randall of Bath, Ohio: Her Ancestors and Descendants” by Theodore N. Woods; p. 77; published by T. N. Woods; Phoenix, Arizona; 1991 (CS71.R19 1991 LofC)
“New England Marriages Prior to 1700” compiled by Clarence Almon Torrey; p. 568; Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.; Baltimore, Maryland; 1985 (974.0 NEa/Marriage SCGS)
“A Genealogical Account of the Descendants in the Male Line of William Peck, one of the founders in 1638 of the Colony of New Haven, Connecticut” by Darius Peck; Bryan & Goeltz; Hudson, New York; 1877 (929.2 P3364P ACPL)

 

Joseph Holt

 1655-1697

Joseph Holt

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Joseph Holt was born April 02, 1655 in New Haven, CT. He was the son of William Holt and Sarah (Unknown).  He married Elizabeth French November 20, 1684 in Wallingford or New Haven, CT. Joseph died December 19, 1697 in New Haven, CT at age 41. Burial:Center Street Cemetery Wallingford New Haven County.

 

Joseph Holt was an early settler in Wallingford, though not an original subscriber. , He was married to Elizabeth French by Major Nash.

The children of Joseph Holt and Elizabeth French are:

 

  1. Joseph Holt (10 Jun 1685-2 Jun 1767)
  2. Daniel Holt (6 Oct 1687-1749)
  3. Capt. Benjamin Holt (3 Sep 1690-28 Oct 1742)
  4. Mary Holt (29 Jan 1693/4-ca 1729) b. Wallingford Jan. 9,1693; m. Dec. 23, 1714, Thomas Boys.
  5. Elizabeth Holt (23 Mar 1696-3 Jun 1768

History of Wallingford, Conn:

from its settlement in 1670 to the present time, including Meriden, which was one of its parishes until 1806, and Cheshire, which was incorporated in 1780: Charles Henry Stanley Davis

 

Mary Holt

1693-1729

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Holt was born 29 Jan 1693/94 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut, daughter of Joseph Holt and Elizabeth French. Mary married Thomas Royce (Thomas“Roys”) on 23 Dec 1714 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.  She died Aft. 04 Jul 1729 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

Children Of Thomas Royce And Mary Holt Are:

 

  1. Sarah Roys, B. 23 Jun 1716, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; M. Thomas Hurlburt,Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.
  2. Joseph Roys, B. 16 Jul 1719, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. 18 Apr 1777, Wallingford, Newhaven, Connecticut.
  3. Mary Roys, B. 12 Feb 1722/23, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut M. Jehiel Parmelee.Of Farmington, New Haven, Connecticut
  4. Benjamin Roys, B. 26 Jun 1724, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.
  5. Thomas Roys, B. 29 Jun 1727, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut D. 24 Jul 1749, Wallingford,New Haven, Connecticut.
  6. Enos Roys, B. 04 Jul 1729, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. 25 Jul 1749, Wallingford, Newhaven, Connecticut.

A genealogical history of the Holt family in the United States: more particularly the descendants of Nicholas Holt of Newbury and Andover, Mass., 1634-1644, and of William Holt of New Haven, Conn Daniel Steele Durrie

 

William Holt

1610-1683

Immigrant Ancestor

Signed New Haven Colony Constitution

William Holt

Joseph Holt

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

                                                                 WILLIAM HOLT AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

                                                                FIRST GENERATION AND CHILDREN.

William Holt was one of the early settlers of New Haven, in the state of Connecticut. The exact time and place of his birth have not been ascertained. From the record of his death, which occurred in the year 1683,’ it appears he was born in the year 1610. He was undoubtedly from England, but the time when he came to New England is not known, nor at what port he landed.

The first information we have of him was the occasion of signing his name (with six other persons) to the New Haven colony constitution, on the first day of July, 1644. This constitution was revised and enlarged on the seventh of March previous, at which time many persons subscribed their names to it; and from the fact that William Holt’s name was not attached at that time, the inference is that he was not then a resident. As he was not one of the first settlers at New Haven, his allotments of lands are not as large as many others; and at this time it is difficult to locate them. There are no records existing of the two first allotments, or divisions, to the first settlers. The earliest one recorded is the third, made about 1680, and which did not include any land in the town plat, or within two miles of it. The only way of ascertaining the first location (except in a few instances by special grants) is by a laborious tracing back of the title from the present owner, to the original owner, by means of the record of the settlements of estates in the probate office, and of the sales and conveyances of lands in the town clerk’s office. The labor of this process is also increased by the fact that for more than one hundred years the streets had no specific names, but were all called either town street or highway.

The original home lot of William Holt was on the north side of what is now called Water street, and on that section of it which lies between Union street on the west and Olive street on the east. It contained about two acres, and had on the south the highway by the water side, on the north a tract of undivided land belonging to the town, called, the Oystershell field, on the west the home lot of Thomas Morris, and on the east a home lot which in 1673 belonged to John Todd, a son of Christopher Todd. The original lot of William Holt was increased in depth by two several grants of land from the town, of small portions of this common land on the north; one of four rods deep, made in 1649, to William Holt, and the other of five rods, made in 1682, to John Holt, the son of William. The breadth of the lot on the street cannot be easily ascertained, because about the year 1720, this and two or three of the adjoining lots became the property of one owner (Moses Mansfield), and the original division lines between the lots were not noticed in subsequent conveyances. A part of the large lot thus formed, probably one and a half acres of it, was in 1771 sold to the notorious Benedict Arnold, and in 1782 was confiscated (together with the large mansion now on it) by the state of Connecticut, and sold by the state, as forfeited property, to Capt. John Prout Sloan, and in 1798 was purchased of his heirs by the celebrated Dr. Noah Webster, of dictionary celebrity, and was occupied by him as a mansion and a home lot for more than ten years. Probably one-half of the original Holt lot was in the portion sold to Arnold. In the New Haven records, under date Nov. 20, 1648, it is stated that William Holt and others petitioned the general court to have land on the east side, between Red rock and Mr. Davenport’s farm—which petition was granted.

About the year 1675 he removed to Wallingford, when he conveyed his home lot in New Haven to his sons, Nathaniel and John. William Holt was probably married in England. His wife’s name was Sarah , of whom but little is known. In July, 1656, her children, Eleazer, Thomas and Joseph, were baptized in her right, from which it is inferred he was not at that time a church member. She survived her husband, and married 2d, Deacon William Peck, who died Oct. 4, 1694, at the residence of his son in Lyme, Conn., aged 83.

William Holt lived ten years after his removal to Wallingford, and died there Sep. 1, 1683, aged 73 years. He-left no will. His property was appraised by his son-in-law Abram Doolittle, and Eleazar Park, and amounted to the sum of £238, 10s., 9d.

Children of William1 (1) and Sarah Holt of New Haven.

1. John4 (9) b. New Haven 1645; m. Jan., 1673, Elizabeth, daughter of John and Tabitha Thomas. She was b. Mar. 15,1648. He d. at East Haven June 16, 1733, aged 86. She d. at New Haven. 4 ch.

There is not found in New Haven any allotment of lands to him in the third division, made about 1680. He had an allotment of 20 acres as being a descendant of the original proprietor and being a resident of the town with his family. When his father removed to Wallingford he conveyed to his sons, Nathaniel and John, his home lot in New Haven, and the former, who was a resident of New London in 1689, sold his interest to his brother. John Holt, in 1721, sold this property to Moses Mansfield. In deeding this property he styles him a mariner. He subsequently removed to East Haven. .

2. Nathaniel2 (13) b. New Haven 1647; in 1673 removed to New London, and in 1689 to Newport, R. I. He hold the military title of sergeant, and was sent into the Narraganset country, during King Philip’s Indian war, and was wounded in the shoulder at the Great swamp fight, Dec. 19,1675. In Oct., 1678, the general court, on his application for relief, having, as he says, been severely wounded in the cause of his country, awarded him the sum of £5.

His two sons inherited from their gnndfather, Thomas Beebe, and their uncle, Thomas Beebe, who died childless, a valuable homestead in New London known as the Holt Homestead. It wat situated on what is now called Truman street, occupying the space between Hempstead and Black Hall streets, and now covered by aHeast a dozen dwelling houses with gardens und spaceways for each. While residing at New London he followed the business of ship carpenter. He m. 1st, April 5, 1680, Rebecca, daughter of Thomas and Millicent (Ash) Beebe, who d. Mar. or Juno, 1689; after her death he removed to Newport, R. I., where he had a 2d wife, of whom nothing reliable has been ascertained. He d. at Newport May 28, 1723, aged 77; his tombstone is still standing and the inscription legible. 2 ch. by 1st wife and 1 ch. by 2d wife.

3. Mercy* (16) b New Haven 1649; m. at “Wallingford Nov. 9, 1680, Abraham Doolittle. He was b. Feb. 12, 1649. She was the first of his three wives. He m. 2d, Ruth Lathrop of New London, no issue, and 3d, Elizabeth Thorp, by whom he had three sons. Mercy had 4 ch.

4. Eleazar2 (20) b. New Haven Apr. 5, 1651; m. Nov. 5, 1674, Tabitha, daughter of John and Tabitha Thomas. She was b. Dee. 18, 1653; m. 2d, Mary . He d. 1737, aged 86. 8 oh.

He held the military office of ensign. He purchased in New Haven prior to 1686 a house lot formerly belonging to John Thomas, his father-in-law, on the opposite side of the town from his father’s home lot. It had its front on what is now called Morocco street, and on that section of the street which lies between Cayuga avenue on the south and Davenport avenue on the north. His house was at the top of the bank nnd not at the foot where the present houses are built. His lot contained one and a half acres, and was bounded eastward by the highway or creek, northward by the home lot of Isaac Beecher, sr.,. the ancestor of Rev. Dr. Lyman Beecher, westward by the land of Henry Glover, and southward by the land of Tabitha Thomas.

5. Thomas- b. New Haven July 3, 1653; d. unmarried

1677; will dnted June 28, 1676, by which his property, which was appraised at £54, 0s., 5ci., was divided between his brothers.

6. Joseph* (28) b. New Haven Apr. 2, 1655; m. Nov. 20, 1684, Elizabeth French. He d. Dec., 1697, aged 42. She m. 2d, Oct. 5, 1720, Captain Joseph Doolittle. Joseph resided at Wallingford; will dated Dec. 19,1697. Estate appraised at £335,09«. 4 ch.

7. Benjamin2 b. New Haven Mar. 6, 1657; lived at Wallingford, where he d. unmarried Aug. 2,1690, aged 82. Inventory of property taken Nov. 10, 1690, £88, 3s., M.

 

William Holt died in Wallingford, Sept. 1, 1683, aged 83; consequently was born in 1600, in the old country. He was buried in the cemetery at Wallingford, where his tomb-stone can still be seen. (Old Text)

 

Peck, William, New Haven; a merchant from London, born 1601; with wife Eliz. and son Jeremiah, came probably in the Hector, as companion with Govs. Eaton and Hopkins, Rev. John Davenport, and the son of the Earl of Marlborough; arrived at Boston 26 June, 1637; was one of the first compact for New Hampshire in June, 1639; an original proprietor; freeman 1640; deacon from 1659 to his death; had John; Joseph, baptised 1641; and Eliz., 1643. His wife died on a visit to her son at Lynne, and he married Sarah, widow of William Holt, and died 1694.

A genealogical history of the Holt family in the United States:  more particularly the descendants of Nicholas Holt of Newbury and Andover, Mass., 1634-1644, and of William Holt of New Haven, Conn

History of Wallingford, Conn:

from its settlement in 1670 to the present time, including Meriden, which was one of its parishes until 1806, and Cheshire, which was incorporated in 1780: Charles Henry Stanley Davis

The Spirit of ’76:

devoted to the principles, incidents, and men of ’76 and colonial times, Volumes 10-12

 

THE HOTCHKISS FAMILY

A Talk by John I. Coddington

NOTE: The late John Insley Coddington was a renowned genealogist, author and lecturer and a descendant of Sarah, sister of Samuel Hotchkiss whose great-great grandson immigrated to America in 1794 settling in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mr. Coddington researched the English records at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormon) research center and the Shrewsbury library where he found a chart drawn by Joseph Morriss at the request of an English Hotchkiss family. Through his research he amassed much information regarding the Hotchkiss’ in England, but at that time the U.S. genealogical societies were not interested in publishing his findings. At the time of his death he still had not privately published his work. Some years ago he spoke to a Hotchkiss Family Reunion. Following is the text of his presentation.

John Hotchkiss, who I am really sure is the father of the immigrant Samuel, was probably born in Dodington in the Parish of Whitchurch, County of Shropshire, [England] around 1580. He died at Whitchurch, which is the town itself. He moved in from Dodington to the regional town. He was buried on the 10th of January 1665/66, leaving a very interesting will, dated the 25th November 1657; probated the 14th of March 1665/6. In other words, he wrote the will at least nine years before he died. This is good, because you can be sure he was in his right mind when he wrote the will. I have the photostatic copy of the will right here and I will read you the passages which are relevant:

“My son John [that was his oldest son] Hotchkiss was lately indebted to me for the sum of two hundred pounds, where y my assent was given to his bonds for payment of the said sum. One bond is to be paid to my son Thomas Hotchkiss for the sum of forty pounds, the other bond to my son Joshua Hotchkiss for the sum of forty pounds. Another bond to my daughter Susanna for twenty pounds and another to my daughter, Elizabeth Hotchkiss for one hundred pounds. It is my will that my said children, Thomas, John, Susanna and Elizabeth shall and may accordingly to their several uses, have and receive the said sums and I do hereby acquit my said son, John, of his debt to me.”

“To my daughter, Sarah Eadows, the feather bed with bolster, which are on the higher bedstead and two pillows.” [That was my ancestress, I do not descend from the son, Samuel.]

“All other household goods to my daughter Elizabeth Hotchkiss, [that was his maiden daughter who obviously stayed home and looked after the old man].

“Linens to be divided between my daughters Elizabeth, Sarah and Susanna. To my son-in-law, Ralph Eadows, and to his daughter, Sarah, and to his wife, Sarah, five pounds per annum; to my son-in-law John Salmon and his wife Susanna, five pounds per annum; to each of my grandchildren, five shillings. To my sister-in-law Ann Wickstead, widow, twenty pounds and to my cousin Elizabeth Whithall, the elder, twenty pounds.”

Then he goes on to say: “To my son, Samuel, if he be living, ten pounds or if he be deceased then to his children, ten pounds to be equally divided among them.” This, in Donald Jacobus’s mind and in mine, means that the son, Samuel, was not at home. The old man did not know whether Samuel was alive or dead, but he did know that Samuel was married and had children, so that he said “if my son be alive 10 pounds go to him, if dead, 10 pounds goes to his children.” Where could that Samuel be? Well, Samuel of New Haven had all of the family names among his children that all his brothers and sisters had. Therefore, there seems to be little doubt that this is the right Samuel, and we have the will of the father.

I neglected to say that the old man was a draper, a man who deals in cloth of various kinds, whether or not the cloth was made up into clothing. Usually a draper dealt in cloth that had already been woven into bolts of cloth and the people would buy this and either the women of the family or somebody else made the cloth into garments. It was a reasonably well paying job and remember that he had silver spoons, so this was a family of a considerable substance. And I think this fits in quite well with what we know of the Samuel Hotchkiss family in New Haven.
We know that Samuel was married, and in the New Haven town records it seems that they got married in a hurry, and I think they were whipped for being naughty before marriage. But this happened very frequently. The record in the New Haven town records is that when they got married they could not obtain the permission of their parents because it was necessary for them to get married right away. So the permission of the parents was dispensed with. This means that the parents were nowhere around. And this squares exactly with Samuel Hotchkiss being the son of a couple who were in England.

But who was Elizabeth Cleverly? That is the Big Question! We have never been able to find her parents. Where she came from, I don’t know. There were Cleverlys in the Boston area, but I haven’t been able to attach her to them, so I just simply don’t know.

Now the ancestry and relatives of your ancestor, Samuel Hotchkiss, are interesting people. They are to be found in two distinct visitations. Visitations are documents taken by a member of the College of Arms in England. The earliest ones were taken in the 1590’s and they continued to be taken at various times into the 1660’s. And then they stopped. They were taken county by county, and those families that claim to have the right to bear a coat of arms had to come into the county seat – Shrewsbury in the case of Shropshire – and depose that they had a Coat of Arms and show some sort of document to prove this. And show, of course, what their Arms were. Whether they were this color or that color or some other color. Well, strangely enough, none of the Hotchkisses in Shropshire, which is where they came from, ever bothered to produce their Arms. And they are not registered in the visitations of Shropshire. They are registered in the visitations of Bedfordshire and of Berkshire because branches of the family had gone from Shropshire to those two counties and had appeared at the time of the visitations in each of those two counties and had their Arms registered. So, we can say that those arms do belong to the Hotchkiss family and that the Hotchkisses do have a right to them, even though the ones in the old home county of Shropshire do not make a claim to them.

The ancestry of John, who died in 1665, part of whose will precedes, is known for about four generations. They didn’t do anything very spectacular, I’m sorry to say. There was one marriage of the grandmother to a Cotton, and the Cottons were a little bit above the Hotchkisses socially speaking. They stayed in Shropshire and eventually the head of the Cotton family was raised to the peerage, as Viscount Combermeir. So we have remote, very remote kin, who were in the House of Lords. Not very important peers. The Viscount Combermeir never amounted to a great deal, I’m sorry to say. But, of all events, this is a perfectly good and respectable ancestry for a few generations.

Now, interestingly enough, the brothers of the man who came to New Haven did rather interesting things. Thomas went to the University of Cambridge, Christ Church College, and then became a clergyman in a little Parish in Wilshire and lived there for the rest of his life. I suppose he was a Puritan – he was in correspondence with a number of Puritans. He did continue to keep on good terms with his bishop and he never lost his job, as some Puritans did. He wrote the most dreary theological tracts that you can possibly imagine, and some of these have been published and I have read them, hoping to find something in the way of a biographical or a genealogical clue. Some of the Rev. Thomas Hotchkiss’s works are in the Harvard Rare Books Library – the Houghten Library at Harvard, and some are in the Union Theological Seminary in New York, which is up near Columbia University, uptown. As I said before they are the most boring writings. I regret that Tom was such a dull man.

Now I will say something for the dull Uncle Tom. He was the Rector of the Parish of Stanton in Wilshire and he performed the wedding of one of his brothers – one of the ones who stayed in England. He went to Stanton and married a girl named Elizabeth Stedman. They then moved to London and all their children were born in London. And that brother was named Joshua. All of his descendants lived in London. There was another brother who was an apothecary, who also went to London to live. This is part in general of a pattern of middle class families, who would send sons to London because that was where they could make a better living than they could back at home. The eldest son stayed on the land; the youngest sons had to get out and scramble. In this family one was a clergyman, one came to New Haven and two went to London.

The following set of 5 pages is taken directly from the title and next six pages of Nellie Cowdell’s “The Hotchkiss Family – First Six Generations”: Gateway Press, Inc., Baltimore: 1985, a publication sponsored by The Hotchkiss Family Association, Inc. and provides some insight into the origins of the Hotchkiss family in America.

Charity Hotchkiss

1761-1851

Mother of Eleven

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hotchkiss Russell” border=”0″ height=”387″ width=”236″>

1800’s Fashion

Charity (Jesse5, Gideon4  ,Steven3, Joshua2, Samuel1 ) was the daughter of Jessee Hotchkiss and Charity Mallory. She was born Mar 24, 1761 in Watertown, Litchfield County Connecticut, USA. Charity married Riverus Russell Abt. 1781 and died Mar 25, 1851 in York, Livingston, NY. Burial: Burial: Job Wood Cemetery, York Livingston County New York, USA

       

Children of Riverus Russell and Charity Hotchkiss are:

 

  1. Leverett Russell, b. Feb 28, 1783, Cheshire, Wallingford Co., New Haven, CT; d. Mar 22, 1857, Windson, Broome Co., NY.
  2. Benedict Russell, b. Nov 15, 1784, Cheshire, New Haven, CT; d. Aug 29, 1857, Leon, Cattaraugus, NY.
  3. Mary Russell, b. Jun 16, 1786, Cheshire, New Haven, CT; d. Bef. 1815.
  4. Elizabeth “Betsy”Russell, b. Abt. 1788, Cheshire, New Haven, CT; d. Jun 1860; m. Silas Hall; b. New Haven, CT.
  5. Augustus Russell, b. Aug 25, 1791, Cheshire, New Haven, CT; d. Mar 10, 1881, Linewood, York, Livingston, N.Y..
  6. Charity Leverett Cowley Russell, b. 1795, NY; m. John Watkins; b. Abt. 1782, Of Cheshire, New Haven, CT; d. Bef. 1815.
  7. Russell Russell, b. Abt. 1797, NY.
  8. Beulah Russell , b. Jan 18, 1797, Cheshire, New Haven, CT; d. Dec 16, 1885, New Haven Twp., Huron Co., OH.
  9. Temperance Russell, b. 1800, NY; d. 1886.
  10. George Nelson Russell, b. Jan 24, 1802, New York; d. Feb 17, 1865, York Twp. Livingston Co., NY.
  11. Riverus Russell, JR, b. Jul 12, 1805, New York; d. May 28, 1862, Ransom, Hillsdale Co., MI.

 

Gideon Hotchkiss

1716-1807

Deacon, Fought in French & Indian War

and

Revolutionary War

 

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Gideon Hotchkiss ( Gideon4  ,Steven3, Joshua2, Samuel1 ) was born Dec. 5, 1716 in New Haven County, CT to Stephen Hotchkiss and Elizabeth Sperry. He married (1) Anna Brockett of Wallingford, Jan 18, 1737After her death, he married (2) Mabel Stiles. He died Sep. 3, 1807 in Prospect New Haven County Connecticut, USA, and is buried at the Prospect Town Cemetery Prospect New Haven County Connecticut, USA.

SAR record states the following: Had 8 sons. Was a Lieutenant and Captain in French & Indian War 1758-9, commissioned by Governor Fitch. Was at Ticonderoga with sons Jesse & David. Was in the New Haven Invasion & Danbury Raid. Waterbury Comm. Safety 77, Commissioner for Revolutionary Soldiers Clothing. Had 5 sons in the War. Founder & first Deacon of the Congregational Churches in Naugatuck and Prospect.

Inscription:
GIDEON HOTCHKISS
DEC. 5, 1716
SEPT 3, 1807
LIEUTENANT & CAPTAIN IN THE FRENCH & INDIAN WAR
COUNCILMAN & SOLDIER IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR
A FOUNDER & FIRST DEACON OF THE CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCHES IN NAUGATUCK & PROSPECT
A CITIZEN OF WORTH & INFLUENCE IN HIS COMMUNITY
A GODLY AND FAITHFUL MAN
________________
HONORED HERE BY HIS DESCENDANTS

Gideon Hotchkiss by his integrity and industry became a man of influence and importance. His family life was most commendable, being a fond and faithful husband and father. His devout and devoted wife lived with him long enough to pass the silver anniversary. July 27, 1762, she bore her twelfth child and five days later is the date of her death, aged forty-six years.

 

On the Washington’s Birthday following, six months after the wife’s death, Gideon Hotchkiss married another worthy woman with a most modern name of Mabel, daughter of Isaac Stiles of Woodbury, and fame followed, for the first child became the wife of Chauncey Judd, the lad who was kidnapped by some treasonable Tory allies, lest he disclose what he had accidentally overheard or seen of their proposed plots. He was from near his home in what is now Millville, in Naugatuck, to a place beyond Gunntown, on the borders of what is now Middlebury, and there concealed and confined in cellar and cave for some days. Then, under the cover of darkness, he was conveyed to Derby and stowed on a boat sailing to and landing at Long Island. A rescuing party was formed, the youth was recovered safe, but hardly sound, being shaken, if not shattered, in mind and body, by the suffering and scare. Some of his captors spent a season in the New England “Newgate” near Simsbury.

 

But let us return to Gideon. Without particulars we introduce the prevailing uneasiness of the colonies under the paternal government during the sixteenth century, which drew sharp lines and soon made men stand upon one side or the other. The French and Indian War commenced, one can hardly tell when and where, but eventually raged along and on the beautiful lakes George and Champlain and ended in the death of Montcalm at Quebec. In this loyalty to the Crown contest Waterbury played her part well. In the military company that went out from here, the ensign was Gideon Hotchkiss, appointed by Governor Thomas Fitch, November 3, 1756.

 

Doubtless he served a year but not more, for we find the subject of our sketch a deputy to the General Court in 1757. But again he goes forth to war and this time with the commission of lieutenant in 1758. The ne.xt year he repeats and alternates by being deputy to the General Court, but only to find him in another twelve months marching toward the front and at the front bearing the commission of captain .

 

The spirit of the sire seized the sons and two who were big enough entered the ranks and I doubt not but what the two next in succession, aged seventeen and sixteen, respectively, begged to go too. The following letter written by Gideon Hotchkiss when in service in the French and Indian War, to his eldest son, Jesse, also in service at another station, bears witness to the patriotism and piety of the man:

 

saratoga, Aug. 16, 1757

 

. After my tender regards to you. hoping that these lines may find you in good health as I am at present and so was your mother and brothers and sisters and all your and our friends when I came from home. You will hear the melancholy news of our upper fort. I understand you was well the last I heard from you. I am glad to hear from you and the welfare of all of our friends. Give my love to Lieut. Beehe and to Cor. Weed and tell Cor. Weed that I would not have him send any letter to me but what he is willing every one should see, for they break almost all open that comes. You will hear the reason of our being here. I have not time to write for the men are now agoing and so I must conclude with a word of advice to you. beseeching of you to seek to him that is able to deliver you and to sanctify and cleanse you from all sin. O my son I beg of God to fit you for a dying hour, this is the only time, now while you are in health.

 

Gideon Hotchkiss.”

 

(This son. Jesse, and his son, Asabel, served in the Revolutionary War where the father. Jesse, died from the effects of the smallpox caught in nursing his brother Eben, ill with the disease. Jesse died at the early age of thirty-eight, leaving eleven children fatherless.)

 

After the French and Indian War, Gideon Hotchkiss returned to his family and farm, doubtless with the desire to follow peaceful pursuits. But another contest was soon on and this time against and not for the Crown. The records of the town of Waterbury dated November 17, 1774, reveal an intimation of the approaching War of the Revolution when a meeting was warned “to take action on the Eleventh Article of the Association of General Congress.” The substance of the “Article” was that every town he recommended to appoint a committee whose business it should be to attentively observe the conduct of all persons touching that Association of General Congress, and if anyone was found inimical to it the case was to be published in the Gazette; “to the end that all such foes to the rights of British America might be publickly known and universally contemned as the enemies of American liberty.”

 

Fourteen men were appointed called the “Committee of Inspection,” and from Salem (now Naugatuck) district, we find the names of two, one being that of Gideon Hotchkiss.

Again, in 1777, after the surrender of Burgoyne, on “the request of the Governor and Council of Safety,” the town appointed fifteen men to give aid and relief to the Continental soldiers and here we find again the name of Gideon Hotchkiss among the rest. But in this great conflict which reduced life and property Gideon Hotchkiss was too advanced in years to sustain continued service. He sent two sons and a grandson to the front and he was expected to stand by the stuff at home. But the ruling spirit was strong in old age and after the autumn work on the farm was done. Captain Gideon and his company of veterans “soldiered” it through the winter where they were most needed and also organized a company known as “Light Horse Cavalry” and went to Woodbury and Danbury and wherever there was an alarm of British invasion along the coast of Connecticut.

 

It is told that when New Haven was attacked, Captain Gideon heard the firing while working on his farm in present Prospect. Like Putnam, he mounted his horse in the field and with a hired boy behind, ealloped toward the Elm City, encountering the enemy at Westville, where there was then a ford, the fight having been changed from the former attack at West Haven. Arriving at the scene of battle he dismounted and was about to send back the servant with the steed. Just then a cannon ball struck the lad, killing him instantly. But there was no time to show sorrow or sentiment. The old soldier picked up the body of the boy and laid it tenderly in a concealed place beside the road, then turning his horse’s head homeward he gave him a sharp cut with a whip, which started him off at a furious gait, while the veteran captain remained to take part in the existing fray.

 

It would not be fair to omit in this sketch the mention of this man’s connection with the church as well as the relation to the country which has been told. He bore the title of Deacon as well and as worthily as that of Captain. Of course, when coming from Cheshire, he connected himself with the First Church in Waterbury, for there was no other church thereabouts. It was a long way to worship from what is now Southern Prospect to Waterbury Green. “Winter privileges” were allowed for Salem or Salem Bridge (now Naugatuck) as early as 1769. In 1772, petition was made to the General Assembly for a distinct and separate Ecclesiastical Society and signed by Gideon Hotchkiss. The petition was granted and the moderator of the first society meeting, 1773, was Gideon Hotchkiss. The church was organized Feb. 22, 1781, and one of the first two Deacons was Gideon Hotchkiss. The first meeting-house on a hill over the river east of the present center of Naugatuck was completed a little over a year after the organization of the church and Gideon Hotchkiss paid promptly as his assignment the no mean sum, in those days, of twenty pounds. At the time of the “raisin”‘ he showed that the “spirit” was willing, for he provided “a bbl of sider” and also that the “flesh” was not weak, for he furnished:

“9 Ibs of salt pork
30 Ibs fresh pork
two of the best sheep I had.”

 

He served as Deacon and generous supporter of this church and society for eighteen years and then when Columbia (now Prospect) was “set off” as a parish he fell within its boundaries. The church in Prospect he served as deacon for eight years and gave liberally to its support, though from the records of the Naugatuck church and society it seems that he never formally severed his relations with the same. In his will he remembered equally both the church in Prospect and Naugatuck. He died full of years aged ninety-one, having had nineteen children, one hundred and five grandchildren, one hundred and fifty-five great-grandchilren and living to see four great great-grandchildren, in all two hundred and eighty-three—a record which would readily write down President Roosevelt as a race suicidalist.

A Memorial Sermon

 

A memorial sermon on the man delivered shortly after his death was printed and after a long search a single copy has been secured, though doubtless others are in hiding. The sermon was preached by Reverend Abram Fowler, the first minister of the church in Naugatuck, though then the pastor at Milton, a parish of Litchfield. It is a remarkable discourse, but the author had a remarkable subject. A short extract is illuminated, showing the marvelous business ability of the man, for he accumulated ample means, and to make money on a farm in Prospect means almost a miracle. It is silent as to the military career of Gideon Hotchkiss, but reveals that which is mightier, for it makes him an example of one who “ruleth his own spirit” and that, Scripture asserteth, is better than taking a city. It shows a man whose faith had works and whose piety was as practical as it was pronounced.

 

“He was to appearance a steady and unshaken professor of the Christian religion for seventy-one years. The deacon had a great taste for reading, and books on moral subjects were his chief attention. Being a man of property, his library, for one in his occupation, was large and excellently chosen. Nor was this treasure unimproved.

 

“Though his natural temper was rather severe, yet he obtained so complete a victory over it as to be mild and candid in almost every instance, so that at all times he appeared the meek and benevolent Christian. He so governed himself that what of his natural temper might otherwise have been to his disadvantage, seemed to add a dignity to him in the government of his family, and in his advice, cautions and reproofs to others.

 

He was a person of distinguished integrity, sobriety and justice, and warmly urged, by his example, that important direction of the Saviour: ‘As ye would that men should do to you, do ye the same to them.’ It was a maxim with him that with respect to spiritual concerns men ought to live constantly ready to die; but as to temporals, as though they should live always; or that men should never omit the doing of anything which might be in future a benefit to others, because they might not live to enjoy it themselves.

 

“He was a warm and decided advocate for order, regularity and government in community, and those who were unruly might always expect a strict, conscientious and faithful reproof, and thouerh always administered with coolness, yet with that

firmness and perseverance as would render it intolerable to live with him and their vices.

 

He was a strict observer of the Sabbath and a constant attendant on orderly public worship and urged the duty on all neglectors. He was solemn and devout in worship and ever paid a sacred regard to all the ordinances and institutions of the house of God. His conversation with all people generally turned on subjects of religion and he was a faithful, though friendly, reprover of all vice and immorality; the gravity and serenity with which he appeared at all times manifested the sincerity of his heart to all his acquaintances.

 

He always considered candid and plain dealing the best mark of friendship to mankind. He appeared to love the religion of the gospel and those doctrines in particular which place Jehovah on the throne and abase man in the dust; he was a praying man for saints and sinners, for God’s glory and Zion’s good. He was ever mindful of the poor and needy of all descriptions, and was ready to do good to all men, especially to the household of faith. The two last churches, of which he was a member (Salem and Columbia), shared in his liberality and benevolent regard for them as churches of Christ.

 

“To each he bequeathed sixty-six dollars, sixty-seven cents for the benefit of their poor members. Nor was his benevolence of a contracted kind, for he had in his heart a tender regard for those who had not the benefit of the stated ministry by means of their local situation; his feeling mind for the good of mankind led him to remember not only the new settlements, but the heathen world. He bequeathed to the missionary society of Connecticut likewise sixty-six dollars, sixty-seven cents, to be applied to the purposes of assisting the new settlements and to enlighten the heathen of our wilderness into the gospel of Jesus Christ.

 

“Nor were these donations for want of natural heirs to his property; his posterity are numerous; he has been the father of nineteen children, one hundred and five grandchildren, one hundred and fifty-five great-grandchildren and four of the fifth generation ; in all, two hundred and eightythree.

 

“The deceased was a sincere friend to those whom he considered the faithful ministers of Jesus. He justly considered them but men, and that they depended like other men and Christians on God for grace and strength to fulfil their duty. He considered their work great and arduous and of everlasting importance to mankind, and that their success depended on an arm Divine. These considerations led him ever to feel an heart to encourage and support them. These feelings were on his heart when at the throne of grace. We, who have in turn been his accepted ministers, have doubtless shared in the benefits of his sincere addresses at the throne of grace for divine aid, grace and faithfulness in our ministry and for a blessing to attend it, as well as his liberalities for our temporal comfort and support.

 

He loved the company of the saints and the fellowship of the church of God, and often spoke of the importance of their shining as a litrht in the world, by being conformed to the gospel in faith and manners and of their beauty when they were in unity. These were things for which he labored. The churches to which he belonged have shared the strength of his wisdom and exertions to promote this object and his prayers to God for this blessing; for on God he ever depended for success.

 

“This church, then, has lost an important blessing and pillar of its support; a faithful seeker of its increase in number and graces; by his examples, by labors with the members to stir up their minds by way of remembrance, and by his faithful exertions for the salvation of sinners, and by his prayers to God for His presence and blessing upon all the people.”

 

The grave of Gideon Hotchkiss is in the cemetery at Prospect in rather an obscure situation and marked by a stone altogether too modest, inscribed only with the title of deacon and with no information save the date of his death September 3, 1807, and the age ninety-one.

 

A recently received letter from a lineal descendant reads as follows: “About four years ago I found the head stone, which was a rather tall slab, broken entirely off and lying upon the ground. Fearing that the site would be entirely lost, I had the slab cut off arid reset at my own expense. I hope that it will last until some of his many descendants see fit to place a more enduring monument at the resting-place of this most loyal servant of his country and honored servant of his God.”

 

As an indication of the respect which the children and children’s children, even to the fourth generation, paid to him, it is said that when they entered the room where sat their aged ancestor, they uncovered their heads, and, putting their hats under their arms, addressed him -with the words: “Honorable father!”

 

So we, having been presented to him to-day and heirs of the results of his pious and patriotic life, now on our departure from his presence, with uncovered heads and in admiring and grateful hearts, echo those earlier words: “Honorable father!”

 

Children of Anna Brockett and Gideon Hotchkiss:

 

  1. Jesse Hotchkiss Born: 09 OCT 1738 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 29 SEP 1776 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT  Spouses: Charity Mallory
  2. David Hotchkiss Born: 05 APR 1740 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Spouses: Abigail Douglas; Peninah Todd
  3. Abraham Hotchkiss Born: 03 MAY 1742 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 03 MAY 1742 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  4. Abraham Hotchkiss Born: 25 MAR 1743 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 29 OCT 1806 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Spouses: Hannah Weed
  5.  Gideon Hotchkiss  Born: 31 DEC 1744 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  6. Huldah Hotchkiss Born: 27 JUN 1747 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 28 MAR 1774 Spouses: Joseph Payne
  7. Anna Hotchkiss Born: 22 OCT 1749 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 17 FEB 1835 Spouses: Reuben Williams
  8. Amos Hotchkiss Born: 24 NOV 1751 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: 13 MAY 1820 Spouses: Abigail Scott
  9. Submit Hotchkiss Born: 02 JUN 1753 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Spouses: David Payne
  10. Titus Hotchkiss Born: 26 JUN 1755 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  11. Eben Hotchkiss Born: 13 DEC 1757 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  12. Asahel Hotchkiss Born: 15 FEB 1760 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT Died: in Sharon, Litchfield, CT  Spouses: Sarah WILLIAMS; Phebe MERRIMAN
  13. Benoni (still-born) Hotchkiss Born: 27 JUL 1762 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT

 

DAR Records : HOTCHKISS, GIDEON

 

Ancestor #: A058882

Service:

CONNECTICUT    Rank(s): CIVIL SERVICE, PATRIOTIC SERVICE

Birth:

12-5-1716    WALLINGFORD NEW HAVEN CO CONNECTICUT

Death:

9-3-1807     WATERBURY NEW HAVEN CO CONNECTICUT

Service Source:

CTSDAR, NON-MILITARY SERVICE IN THE REV, 1774-1784, VOL 2, P139

Service Description:

1) MEMBER OF WAR COMMITTEES; INSPECTOR OF PROVISIONS

 

Jesse Hotchkiss

1738-1776

Revolutionary War/Died on the Battlefield

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Jesse Hotchkiss (Gideon4  ,Steven3, Joshua2, Samuel1 ) was born 09 OCT 1738 in Waterbury, New Haven, CT  to Gideon Hotchkiss and Anna Brockett.   Jesse married Charity Mallory, (daughter of  Peter Mallory and Mary Beardsley). Jesse and his son Asabel (Asahel), served in the Revolutionary War where Jesse died from the effects of the smallpox caught while nursing his brother Eben, who was ill with the disease. Jesse died at the early age of thirty-eight, leaving eleven children fatherless.

 

It has been alleged that smallpox was used as a weapon during the American Revolutionary War (1775-83). During the winter of 1775-76, American forces were attempting to free Quebec from British control. After capturing Montreal, it looked as if they might succeed. But in December 1775, the British fort commander reportedly had civilians immunised against the disease and then deliberately sent out to infect the American troops. A few weeks later a major smallpox epidemic broke out in the American ranks, affecting about half of the 10,000 soldiers. They retreated in chaos after burying their dead in mass graves.

 

Children of Charity Mallory and Jesse Hotchkiss are:

 

  1. Asahel Hotchkiss (Asael) b.2/15/1760 Married Phebe Merriman
  2. Charity Hotchkiss b.3/24/1761
  3. Bulah Hotchkiss b.3/24/1762 d oct 24. 1776
  4. Gabril Hotchkiss b.aug 13, 1773 d Jan 22, 1765
  5. Rebecka Hotchkiss b.Jan 7, 1765
  6. Temperance Hotchkiss b.Dec 3, 1767
  7. Apalina Hotchkiss b.Jan 3, 1768
  8. Cloe Hotchkiss b.Jan 5, 1771
  9. Anna Hotchkiss b.May 19, 1772  married Abijah Guernsey
  10. Hudlah Hotchkiss b.March 9, 1774
  11. Jesse Hotchkiss b.Aug 3 1776 married  1.Abigail Thrasher, 2.Elizabeth King

 

HOTCHKISS, JESSE

 

DAR #: A058899

Service:

CONNECTICUT    Rank: SOLDIER

Birth:

1738    WATERBURY NEW HAVEN CO CONNECTICUT

Death:

9-29-1776     IN THE ARMY

Service Source:

ANDERSON, TOWN AND CITY OF WATERBURY CT, 1896, PP. 460, 463

Service Description:

1) ON WATERBURY LIST OF SOLDIERS

 

DAR Research System

The town and city of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 1

By Sarah Johnson Prichard

 

Revolutionary War. Died on the battlefield, Sept 29, 1776. Waterbury, New Haven, CT.

 

Joshua Hotchkiss

1651-1722

Ensign, Sheriff, Deacon

Westville CT’s First Settler

Joshua Hotchkiss

Stephen Hotchkiss

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Joshua Hotchkiss (Samuel1 )  was born 16 Sep 1651 New Haven, CT, to Samuel Hotchkiss and Elizabeth Cleverly. He was christened 18 Feb 1693 Cong, Nh, CT. He married 29 Nov 1677 to Mary Pardee (born 18 Apr 1658, New Haven, New Haven, CT, christened 13 May 1662 New Haven, New Haven, CT. She died 1682-84 New Haven, CT) secondly,about 1685, he married Hannah Tuttle, born 24 Feb. 1662, died 17 Feb. 1719; and thirdly, about 1719, he married Mary Ashbun of Milford.

Joshua died 22 Dec 1722 New Haven, New Haven, CT.

 

He was baptized as an adult in New Haven. Records give a Feb. 18, 1693 christening date.

 

He was an Ensign, having served in King Williams War and was a pensioner from same. Joshua was a Sheriff .

The first of the French and Indian Wars, King William’s War (1689–97) was the name used in the English colonies in America to refer to the North American theater of the War of the Grand Alliance (1688–97). It was fought between England, France, and their respective American Indian allies in the colonies of Canada (New France), Acadia, and New England.

He purchased land in Cheshire in 1706, and settled upon it in 1707. He was deacon of the church at Cheshire for 31 years.

 

Joshua married twice more: (2nd) Hannah Tuttle (born 24 Feb. 1662, died 17 Feb. 1719) in 1685 (3rd) Mary Ashbun of Milford in 1719. Joshua was buried in the Center Church on the Green Churchyard New Haven Connecticut Plot: No tombstone remains.

 

Joshua’s family home may still be standing. “A Guide to Historic New Haven, Connecticut Colin M. Caplan – 2007 – History – 190 pagesHOTCHKISS-ALLING HOUSE, CIRCA 1795 This Federal-era house was built by the Hotchkiss family, whose relative Sheriff Joshua Hotchkiss was the area’s first settler in 1658” “In 1658, New Haven Sheriff Joshua Hotchkiss built a home at what is now the corner of Whalley Avenue and Blake Street. As others moved to the area, Westville gradually took the name of Hotchkissville.“ Another account says that John Munson’s property in the Beaver Pond neighborhood finally went to his son-in-law Caleb Hotchkiss, giving the area its name. Many present day streets in Westville are named for early settlers of Westville. More than 100 years later, on July 5, 1779, the British attacked New Haven at Westville. During that battle three members of the Hotchkiss family were killed. The British, who probably came across Forest Road, had landed in West Haven. They were turned back where Edgewood Park is now located. An old cannon marks the site of this historic battle.

According to The New England historical and genealogical register, (Volume 66)   he was “Ensign, Sheriff, and a man of prominence in New Haven.”

Westville

The Westville neighborhood comprises the western most area of New Haven and its development goes back as far as the city’s itself. Home to West Rock, the basalt cliff that rises 400 feet above the West River, Westville remained a small hamlet of mills and manufacturers well into the 19th century. Its growth as a residential suburb helped make the neighborhood one of the most desirable in the city.

Although the earliest known inhabitants were the Wepawaug and Quinnipiac tribes, the first inhabitant of record was Sherriff Joshua Hotchkiss in 1658. The Hotchkiss family prospered and eventually the area, first known as Westfield, was called Hotchkisstown. Richard Sperry became an important resident and in 1660 he assisted William Goffe and Edward Whalley while they were hiding in Judge’s Cave on West Rock.

Children of Joshua Hotchkiss and Mary Pardee are:

  1. Mary Hotchkiss born on 30 Apr 1679 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.
  2. Martha Hotchkiss was born on 14 Dec 1680 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. She was married to Thomas BROOKS on 25 Mar 1702 in Wallingford, New Haven Co., CT.
  3. Stephen Hotchkiss born on 25 Aug 1681 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. married to Elizabeth Sperry on 12 Dec 1704 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.  He died on 5 May 1756 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.

 

Children of Joshua Hotchkiss and Hannah Tuttle are:

 

  1. Hannah, b. abt. 1686; d. 3 Aug. 1723; m. 10 May 1709, Ebenezer Peck.
  2. Priscilla, b. 30 Dec. 1688; m. John Spkrky of Woodbridge, b. 3 Mar. 1684, d. 1754.
  3. Abraham, b. abt. 1691.
  4. Abigail, b. 12 Oct. 1695; d. 30 Aug. 1785; m. 7 Jan. 1722, DanielWinston, b. 18 Aug. 1690, d. 17 Jan. 1780.
  5. Desire, b. abt. 1698; d. Oct. 1702.
  6. Isaac, b. June 1701.
  7. Jacob, b. Feb. 1704.

 

Unknown author, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, by Clarence Almon Torrey., p. 390.

Unknown author, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, by Clarence Almon Torrey., p. 555

The New England historical and genealogical register, Volume 66 pg. 324 – 328

 

Samuel Hotchkiss

AKA Hopkins

1622-1663

Immigrant Ancestor

Founding Family of New Haven CT

Samuel Hotchkiss

Joshua Hotchkiss

Stephen Hotchkiss

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Samuel Hotchkiss was born in the year 1622 in the town of Doddington, Whitechurch Parish, Shropshire, England to John Hotchkiss and Margaret Nevett. He married Elizabeth Cleverly 07/Sep/1642 in New Haven, New Haven, CT. Samuel died 28/Dec/1663 in New Haven, New Haven, CT

 

Regarding Samuel and Elizabeth’s public display, the following:”for their filthy dalliance together, which was confessed by them both, they were both severely whipped.” Then later when they came to ask for permission to get married “having entered into contract, sinfully and wickedly defiled each other with filthy dalliance and unclean passages, by which they have both made themselves unfit for any other, and for which they have both received public correction, upon these considerations, granted them liberty to marry.”

Samuel also was beaten for theft, and for sleeping on his watch.

 

He came from England in “Hector”, with the Davenport Colony, settled at New Haven, Conn. 1638.He was one of the original founders of New Haven, Connecticut in 1638.

In 1652 he purchased a home and lot from John Thompson. In 1655 he was assigned a seat in the meeting house next to the soldier’s seats and his wife was given one on the women’s side. In June 1664 he attended the General Court in New Haven. On August 4th, 1644 he took the oath of fidelity. “Governour Eaton gave the oath to the Commonwealth” Upon his death his estate was valued at 86 pounds 18 shillings. He was listed as Samuel Sr.

In February 1664 the New Haven court granted powers of administration to Samuel’s wife, Elizabeth, as Samuel left no will at the time of his death in December 1663. The estate was to be divided, with two-thirds going to their six children: John, Samuel, Sarah, Joshua, Thomas and Daniel.

Children of Samuel Hotchkiss and Elizabeth Cleverly are:

  1. 1.        John Hotchkiss, B. 1643; D. Wft Est. 1690-1735, New Haven, Connecticut.
  2. 1.        Samuel Hotchkiss, B. 1645, New Haven, Connecticut; D. Wft Est. 1646-1735, Connecticut.
  3. 2.        Sarah Hotchkiss, B. 1647, New Haven, Connecticut; D. Wft Est. 1675-1741, Connecticut; M. Jeremiah Johnson, Wft Est. 1675-1709, Connecticut.
  4. 3.        Joshua Hotchkiss, B. September 16, 1651, New Haven, Connecticut; D. December 22, 1722, New Haven, Connecticut.
  5. 4.        Thomas Hotchkiss, B. August 31, 1654, New Haven, Connecticut; D. Wft Est. 1655-1744, Connecticut.
  6. 5.        Daniel Hotchkiss, B. June 08, 1657, New Haven, Connecticut; D. Wft Est. 1658-1747, Connecticut.

Steven Hotchkiss

1681-1755

Deacon

Steven Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Stephen Hotchkiss (Joshua2, Samuel1 ) was born 25 Aug 1681 Wallingford, New Haven, CT. to Joshua Hotchkiss and Mary Pardee. He was christened 18 Feb 1693 New Haven, CT. He married 12 Dec 1704, Wallingford, New Haven, CT to Elizabeth Sperry (born 17 Jan 1683 Wallingford, New Haven, CT, died 17 May 1760, Cheshire, New Haven, CT)  Stephen died March 25, 1755 Old Graveyard, Cheshire, New Haven, CT. He is buried in the Hillside Cemetery Cheshire New Haven County Connecticut, USA

 

Inscription:
In Memory of Deacon Stephen Hotchkiss who died March 25th 1755 in the 74th year of his age.Faithfully served in the office 31 years.

 

The children of Stephen Hotchkiss and Elizabeth Sperry:

 

  1. Joshua Hotchkiss born 26 August 1705, New Haven, CT. Died 29 Dec 1788 at Cheshire,  New Haven, CT. Married Mary Hotchkiss 2 Feb 1731 at Wallingford, New Haven, CT
  2. Mary Hotchkiss born 1 Jan 1707 New Haven, CT. Died 15 Aug 1764 at Cheshire, New Haven CT. Was married 27 Feb 1734 to (1)Abraham Barnes and married 30 May 1745 to Joseph Ives.
  3. Hannah Hotchkiss born 10 Feb 1709 at Wallingford New Haven CT. Died Mar 1716 Wallingford, New Haven CT
  4. Esther Hotchkiss born 18 Feb 1711 Wallingford, New Haven CT. Died 22 Jul 1732, Cheshire New Haven, CT Married Ephraim Tuttle 16 June 1731 at Wallingford, CT
  5. v. Elizabeth Hotchkiss born 25 Aug 1714 Wallingford New Haven, CT. Died 13 Apr 1732 Cheshire, New Haven CT
  6. Capt. Gideon Hotchkiss born 5 Dec 1716, Wallingford, New Haven, CT. Died 3 Sep 1807, Prospect, New Haven, CT. Married 18 June1737, Waterbury, New Haven, CT to Anna Brockett born 2 Feb 1716, Wallingford, New Haven, CT. Died 1 Aug 1762, Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  7. Stephen Hotchkiss born 1 Dec 1718 at Wallingford, New Haven CT. Died 16 May 1807 at Burlington, Hartford CT. Married (1) Thankful Cook 31 Dec 1742 (2)Ann Royce 2 Mar 1762 (3) Thankful Hickox 13 Sep 1782.
  8. Silas Hotchkiss born 20 Dec 1719 at Wallingford, New Haven CT. Died 9 Jan 1783 at Waterbury, New Haven CT. Married (1) Lois Richards 12 May 1748, Waterbury (2)Abigail Hotchkiss.
  9. Hannah Hotchkiss born 23 Feb 1721 at Wallingford, New Haven CT. Died 9 Oct 1779 Cheshire, New Haven CT. Married 23 Feb 1743 at Wallingford to Stephen Atwater.
  10. Abraham Hotchkiss born 28 Dec 1724 Wallingford, New Haven CT.
  11. Bathsheba Hotchkiss born 1 Sep 1726 at Wallingford, New Haven CT. Died 8 Aug 1813 Southbury, New Haven CT. Spouse: Ralph Lines.
  12. Benjamin Hotchkiss born 1 Feb 1727 at Wallingford, New Haven CT. Died 13 Apr 1815 at Waterbury, New Haven CT. Married 16 Apr 1751 at Wallingford to Elizabeth Roberts.
  13. Noah Hotchkiss born 24 Mar 1729 at Wallingford, New Haven CT. Died 13 Jan 1760 Wallingford, New Haven CT.

 

 

Anne Howell

Est. 1590-Est. 1631

Immigrant Ancestress

 

Anne may have been born about 1590. She married John Parmelee May 15, 1608 in All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England. She died estimated 1631.

The children of Anne Howell and John Parmelee, baptized at All Saints:

1) John Parmelee, b, d. Unknown. Burial: December 16, 1609, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

2)Johan/Joane Parmelee, Burial: July 30, 1628, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

3)Elizabeth Parmelee, b. Bef. December 3, 1610; d. Bef. February 16, 1612/13.Baptism: December 3, 1610, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England Burial: February 16, 1612/13, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

4)John Parmelee, b. Bef. September 6, 1612, Lewes, Sussex, England; d. January 31, 1686/87/88, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA.

5)George Parmelee, b. Bef. December 11, 1614; d. Bef. April 14, 1615. Baptism: December 11, 1614, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, EnglandBurial: April 14, 1615, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

6)Anne Parmelee, b. Bef. March 17, 1615/16; Baptism: March 17, 1615/16, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

7)Mary Parmelee, b. Bef. June 5, 1620; d. Baptism: June 5, 1620, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

Susannah Hubler

1720/21-1804

Susannah Hübler

Anna Catherine Kantner  aka “Catherine Cudner”

Henry Kroh

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Susannah (AKA Susan, Susanna)  Hubler/Hoobler was born 12/Feb/1720/21 in Manheim Township, Berks County Pennsylvania* to Hans (Possibly Johannes) Hübler or Hubler. She married( Johannes) Jacob Kantner (AKA Kanter) abt 1741/42 in Berks County Pennsylvania.  She died 19 Mar 1804 in South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and is buried in the Union Cemetery, Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania (Not listed there on findagrave.com)

 

Religion: Lutheran

Susan Hubler lived in Tulpehocken Twp, Berks County, PA.

 

Wills were filed for:

 

KANTNER, Jacob , Berks Manheim 1791 A4-201 and  KANTNER, Susanna Berks Manheim 1804 A6-143 Administration to son John

 

Children of Susannah Hübler (Hoobler) and Jacob Kanter are:

 

1. Anna Catherine Kantner, b. 17 Oct 1741, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, d. 4 Dec 1804, South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania m. Simon Groh

2. Jacob Kantner,   b. 9 May 1743, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania  d. before 15 Jun 1791, South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania 3.Margaret Kantner,   b. about 1747, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania d. 13 Aug 1825, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County,

4. Apollonia Kantner,   b. about 1749, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

5. John Kantner,   b. 9 May 1751,   d. 1 Jul 1833, South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania

6. Christine Kantner,   b. 28 Mar 1755, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania,   d. 13 Nov 1838, Germantown, Montgomery County, Ohio

7. Nicholas Kantner,   b. 20 Nov 1757,   d. 18 Jun 1840, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

8. George Kantner,   b. about 1761, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania d. 26 May 1816, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania 9. Elizabeth Kantner,   b.

9 Jul 1762,   d. 12 Apr 1814, Bethel Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

10. Catharine Kantner,   b. before 7 Dec 1766

 

http://www.hoobler.com/Individual%20Pages/the_first_hooblers.htm

Strausstown Roots

*Another source: Susanna Hubler was born 1721/22 in the Palatinate

From Pioneers and Patriots “Over the Blue Mountain” Vol 1 – revised

 

copyright 1994 F. Richard Turnbach

 

Extracts of Selected Wills, Estates, Realty, and Orphan’s Court Actions of

potential interest to Schuylkill researchers

 

 

Hester Hyde

Abt. 1625-1703

Immigrant Ancestress

Hester Hyde

Elizabeth Post

Elizabeth Sperry

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hester Hyde (William2,, William1), daughter of William Hyde and Hester Francis Trott was born about 1625 in England. Hester married John Post on 31 Mar 1652/1653 in Saybrook, and died on 13 Nov 1703 in Norwich, CT. She is buried in the Old Norwichtown Cemetery New London, CT.

“It was reported that she may of been was born in England in Hyde Genealogy, or the Descendants in the Female as well as the Male Lines from William Hyde of Norwich. What renders it almost certain that three of the seven daughters of Hester Hyde and John Post must have died previously to 18 Jan 1686, and probably unmarried, is that by a deed of that date, upon the Windham records, it appears that William Hyde willed to the daughters of his only daughter, Hester Post, certain lands in Windham. That a controversy arose between the eldest son of her brother and the devisees, in relation to the validity of this will: and that a compromise took place between him and the three sons-in-laws of Hester Hyde and John Post; Caleb Abell, John Hough and Nathaniel Rudd. And by their deed the latter three conveyed, to the said oldest son of Samuel Hyde the first, one-half of the lands in dispute, in compromise of his claim. And no mention is made of any other granddaughters of the testator, as being in existence, to make any claim to the lands under the will devising the same to the daughters of the testator’s daughter, Hester Post.”

 

Children of Hester Hyde and John Post are:

 

  1. Margaret Post b. 21 Feb 1653 in Middlesex, Ct and died Nov 1700 in Norwich, Ct .Margaret married Sergt. Caleb Abell Jul 1669 in Norwich, MA. Sergt. Caleb was born in 1646 in Rehobeth, Ma. He was the son of Robert Abel. He died on 17 Aug 1731 in Norwich, Ct .
  2.  Elizabeth Post b. 22 Feb 1654/55 in Saybrook, Middlesex, CT, m.(1) Benjamin Bunnell in 1671. m. (2)  John Sperry (born: 1687 in New Haven, CT  and died 1692) in New Haven on 01 Sep 1676. m. (3) Edmund Whorman in 1771. She died in 1715.
  3. John Post was born 12 Apr 1657 and died 15 Jul 1690.
  4. Sarah  Post was born 6 Nov 1659
  5. Abigail Post was born 6 Nov 1664 in Norwich, New London, CT. She died Apr 1676
  6. Samuel Post was born 8 Mar 1668 and died 23 Apr 1735.
  7. Mary Post was born Jun 1669 in Norwich, New London, Ct and died Nov 1705 in Norwich, New London, Ct . Mary married Nathaniel Rudd. Nathaniel was born about 1655 in Saybrook, Middlesex, CT. He died on 18 Apr 1727 in Franklin, New London, CT .
  8. Hannah Post was born Oct 1671 in Norwich, New London, CT.
  9. Lydia Post was born 11 Mar 1674 and died 20 Sep 1753.

 

http://www.sandisullivan.com/Hyde%201.htm

 

William Hyde

Abt 1569-1637

Immigrant Ancestor

Founding Family of Norwich and Hartford, CT.

William Hyde

William Hyde

Hester Hyde

Elizabeth Post

Elizabeth Sperry

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

William Hyde (1)was born about 1569 in Norbury, Chester, England to Robert Hyde and Bernice Claverly*. and died 1637 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA. He married Ellen Stubbs 21 Jul 1609 in Prestbury, Cheshire, England. He married Eleanor Molineux in 1588, who died (est. 1604) in England.

 

1609 Weddings

William Hyde and Ellen Stubbs …xj Julij

 

Notes for William Hyde:

“. William Hyde, (Robert V.14, Robert13, Hamnet12, Robert11, Thomas10, Hamnet9, John8 de Hyde, Robert7 Hyde, Robert6, John5 de Hyde, John4 Hyde, Robert3, Robert2 de Hyde, Matthew1) (The Lord of Norbury is in there somewhere).The 4th son, he matriculated at Christ College, Cambridge, 1597, and was a contemporary of Rev. Peter Bulkeley, who was founder of Concord, Mass. William Hyde, the founder of this branch of the family in America, and a descendant, according to the old family tradition, of the Hyde’s of Norbury, County Chester. He went to Leyden, Holland, and afterwards in 1635 to Boston, Mass., and is believed to be identical with the William Hyde, 4th son of Robert Hyde of Norbury, who was among the original Founders of Hartford, Connecticut, USA, 1639. (Burke says that he was father of another William Hyde. )”

 

Children of William Hyde are:

 

  1.  WilliamHyde, born 1600 in Stockport, Chester, England; died 06 Jan 1680/81 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA.
  2. Robert Hyde b. 1604

 

*Another source has slightly different information, but I tend to trust the Hyde Geneaolgy site.

The register book of christenings, weddings, and burials, within the parish of Prestbury: in the county of Chester, 1560-1636

http://www.sandisullivan.com/Hyde%201.htm

Unknown author, New England Historical and Genealogical Register., Vol. 160, January 2006, p. 30-34.

The register book of christenings, weddings, and burials, within the parish of Prestbury:

in the county of Chester, 1560-1636 pg182

William Hyde (Hide)

1600-1680/81

Surveyor

Founding Family of Norwich and Hartford, CT.

 

William Hyde

Hester Hyde

Elizabeth Post

Elizabeth Sperry

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

William Hyde (Hide) (William1), was born was born between 1597 and 1600 in England, the son of William Hyde and Eleanor Molineux.  He married Hester Francis Trott *. He died at Norwich, January 6, 1681, in the home of his daughter, Hester. He was buried in 1681, Founders Cemetery also known as: Mason Cemetery, Post Gager Burial Ground, Norwich, New London, Connecticut.

 

Immigration: 1633, England to USA, Probably came over with Rev. Thomas Hooker, First Minister of Hartford45

 

It has been reported that William Hyde was born out of wedlock. William Hyde was one of the original proprietors of Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA, in 1660, and a man of considerable importance among the settlers frequently elected as a townsman, or selectman.

 

“Florence Abell Stock and her Ancestry”,

H. Thompson Stock, 1986.

Page: page 31, 44 Text:

 

Norwich was settled in 1660. The 35 original proprietors of that town were William Hyde, and his son, Samuel Hyde, and his son-in-law, John Post. The five sons of Samuel, Sr., had forty children, of whom twenty-five were sons and reared families. This accounts for the rapidity with which the name spread through the county. In 1779, there were upwards of twenty families of Hyde’s, numbering over one hundred and fifty members, in the town plot and western part of Norwich, and notwithstanding the removals to other parts of the country, the census in 1791 records thirteen families of the name in Franklin and eight others in Norwich. The Hyde’s have been pioneers in every generation. As soon as civilization overtook them, some would “move on,” until they were distributed from Maine to California, and from Florida to Puget Sound. No doubt some have made their way to Alaska, not that they avoid civilization, for wherever they settle there is soon seen a church and a school. The pioneer spirit is as much an inheritance as a love of travel. It is the spirit of progress working out in different ways.

 

William Hyde was an important man in Norwich. He had been an original proprietor of Hartford, Connecticut, USA, a proprietor at Saybrook, Connecticut, USA, and then an original proprietor of Norwich. He, his son, Samuel, and his son-in-law, John Post, and thirty two other Saybrook men and their families had found and had settled in Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA in 1660.

 

William Hyde had probably come to Newe Towne (Cambridge) in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1633 with the Reverend Thomas Hooker’s group. In 1636, he and his family were among those who walked to found Hartford, Connecticut, USA. His name is also on the monument in Hartford which honors that city’s pioneers. Here he became a proprietor in 1639.

 

Later, he too went to Saybrook, where he acquired land. In 1660, he, his son, Samuel and his son-in-law, John Post,, and thirty two other Saybrook men and their families founded Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA. They were the original proprietors. In addition to owning their own home lots, they had an interest in the undivided parts of the tract of land that the group had purchased.

 

He was born in England, and married Hester Trott. By her he had these known children; Hester/Esther Hyde, who married John Post, (and) Samuel, who was born about 1637 in Hartford. William Hyde died at Norwich, 6 January 1682. Joanna, his second wife, the widow of Robert Abell, died sometime after 1682. She was buried at Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA. The names of William Hyde/Hide and his son Samuel are among those inscribed on a monument in the “Old Burying Ground” in Norwich, erected in 1871 in honor of the first settlers. A larger monument was erected in 1959 on the Town Green.

 

Hyde Genealogy; From William Hyde, of Norwich

by Reuben H. Walworth, LL. D.,

1864 Page: page 1-3 Text:

 

William Hyde, the first, of Norwich, is not certainly known to have been connected with any of the Hyde families who came to this country from England*. His name first appears at Hartford, Connecticut, USA, in 1636. And his name is on the monument in the old Cemetery at that place as one of the original settlers; and he had lands assigned to him there. The time of his removal to Saybrook, is not ascertained, but he owned lands in Hartford as late as 1639. He probably went to Saybrook soon after that and his daughter was married there early in 1652. On his removal to Norwich he sold his house and home-lot to Francis Bushnell, and other property to Robert Lay. 3 He died Jan. 6, 1681-82. His age is not known, but he was styled “old Goodman Hide” in 1679.

 

The sales are registered at Saybrook, with the following receipt: “I William Hide of Mohegan do acknowledge to have received of Robert Lay of Six Mile Island the full and just sum of forty pounds which was the first payment specified in the agreement made 25th day of January 1659 for all the lands I had at Potapaugue. “Witness my hand 5th of May 1660. “William C C Hide, his mark. ” Saybrook Land Records Book 1 Page 2 Land of Will Hide: His house and home of two Akers more or less abuteing east to the land of John POST south west and north to highway 2. 12 Ackers in the planting field east to the lands of Arthur __ north to the lands of master James FFITCH south to the highway west to the land of Will Beaman. 3. 3 Ackers of meadow ajoyning north to the aforesaid land 4. his right in the towne Comons belonging to the estate of two hundred pounds his Right in the ox pasture belonging to the estate of two hundred pound these above said lands now ___ to Ffrancis Bushnell as doth appear by a bill of sale bearing date the seventeenth of October 1660 and is Recorded to the said Ffrancis folio the 6th. iii Akers of upland lying at poochake abuteing east upon the land of John Post South upon the sea west and north upon poochoak River a parsell of meadow ajoining the upland aforesaid west abuteing east upon the aforesaid lands south to the sea west to the lands of Allexander Chalker Robert Bull Tho. Dunk Will Jackson north to poochook River The abovesaid land was bought by William Lord of Bought of Robert Wade 26 ack and half of upland Bought of Richard Toasland 3 ackers of upland and 3 akers of meadow Bought of Tho ___ 9 ack of upland and 4 ack and half of meadow Lands of ffrancis Bushnell bought of William Hide October 27, 1660 bought of William Hide his house and home lott of an acker and a half lying and being in Saybrook abuteing est to lands of John POST South west and north to the highway also twelve ack of upland in the planting field with three ack of meadow adjoining there to abuteing est to the land of Mr. James FFITCH south to the highway and west to the lands of William Beaman Also six pounds and five shillings in meadow yet to be laid out also a two hundred pound comonage in the towne Comons and a two hundred pound Right in the oxpasture all which house and parsells of land do more fully appear in a deed of sale given under the said his hand bearing date with this Record.

 

The original settlers in Norwich were of English origin. While some had been born in the New World, many had come from England. English settlement in Connecticut, USA had begun in the 1630s along the Connecticut, USA River, coming primarily from Massachusetts Bay Colony. Others came from Plymouth Colony or directly from England. In May 1659, settlers from Saybrook, Connecticut, USA petitioned the Connecticut, USA General Court for permission to start a settlement at Mohegan. Petition was granted quickly and in June, Mohegan leaders transferred the land to them. A small party constructed the first house and wintered over. In 1660, settlement began in earnest. The leaders of this group were Major John Mason and Rev. James Fitch.

 

Due to initially poor record keeping, a listing of original proprietors had to be constructed some years later in order for the Colony to comply with English law. Frances M. Caulkins in her History of Norwich provides the best listing available. These settlers were: Rev. James Fitch, Major John Mason, Christopher Huntington, Simon Huntington, Thomas Adgate, William Hyde, Robert Allyn, William Backus, William Backus., Jr., John Baldwin, John Birchard, Thomas Bliss, Morgan Bowers, Hugh Calkins, John Calkins, Richard Edgerton, Francis Griswold, Samuel Hyde, Thomas Leffingell, John Olmstead, John Pease, John Post, Thomas Post, John Reynolds, Jonathan Royce, Nehemiah Smith, Thomas Tracy, Robert Wade, Thomas Bingham, John Bradford, John Gager, Stephen Gifford, Richard Hendy, Thomas Howard, Thomas Waterman, John Tracy, Josiah Reed, Richard Wallis

 

Some sources have said that William was a cousin (unspecified degree) of Ann Hyde, the wife of James II of England while he was Duke of York. Ann was the mother of Queens Ann and Mary of England.

 

He was chosen surveyor of Highway s in Hartford, 1641. He moved to Saybrook, then to Norwich in about 1660.

 

Opposite Post and Birchard, on the northeast side of the street, were the allotments of William Hyde and his son Samuel, extending back into the commons. The Hyde house stood a few rods back from the town street, upon the “highway into the woods,” as the lane was then called, near the present residence of Henry B. Tracy. The Father and son probably formed but one family. The Mansfield house, built by one of the later Hyde’s, on a part of the old home lot, has descended to the present owner by inheritance on the maternal side from the Hyde’s, and has never been conveyed out the family. ” (Frances M. Caulkins in her History of Norwich) He was a widower & resident in the household of his daughter Hester and her husband John Post at the time of his death.

 

 

Children of William Hyde and Hester Trott are:

 

  1. Hester Hyde, born 13 Sep 1629 in Otham, Kent, England; married John Post 01 Mar 1651/52 in Saybrook, Middlesex County, Connecticut died 13 Nov 1703 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA.
  2. Samuel Hyde, born Abt. 1637 in Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut; died Jul 1677 in Franklin, New London, Connecticut; married Jane (or Sarah) Lee Jun 1659 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut..

 

*This is from a very old text; subsequent research has turned up more information on his family ties; specifically, his father William, who also came to America.

 

Anna Catherine Kantner

1741-1804

Anna Catherine Kantner

Henry Kroh

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Anna Catherine Kantner/ Canter (Jacob2 , Hans 1) (aka Catherine Cudner) was born 17 Oct 1741 in Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Jacob Kanter and Susannah Hubler. She married Simon Groh  (aka Simon Kroh) about 1762  in Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania. She died 04 Dec 1804 in South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, buried St. Paul’s (Summer Hill), Auburn, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania.

 

Kroh, Catherine (Proprietary and state tax lists of the county of Berks: for the years 1767)

By Berks County (Pa.)Number of Acres:100 Horses: 2. Cattle:3. Sheep:2 Persons: 6.)

On another tax roll, she had 100 acres, no negros, 2 horses and 2 cattle.

 

Warrantee of Land in Berks County Nov. 18, 1793 :Groh, Cathrine… 400 Acres

 

Catherine died intestate, as did her husband before her. The probate document reads as follows:

Peter (?) Register for the Probate of Will and granting Letters of Administration in and for the County of Berks.

To Henry Groh Eldest Son of Catherine Groh late of Tupelochen Township Widow Dec.

 

Whereas the said Catherine Groh lately died Intestate (as is affirmed) having whilst she lived and at the time of her death drivers goods, chattels, rights and credits within the said county by means whereof the full disposition and power of granting the administration of all and singular the goods chattels, rights and credits which were the said deceased within the said county and also the auditing the accounts, calculations and reckonings  of the said administration and a final desmission from the same to me is manifestly known to belong. I desiring that the goods, chattels, rights and credits of the said deceased may be well and truly administered, do hereby grant to you the said Henry Groh in whole fidelity in this behalf I very much concede full power by the tenor of these presents, to administer the goods, chattels, rights and credits which were of the said deceased within the said county; and also to ask, collect, levy recover and receive the credits whatsoever of the said deceased, which at the time of her death were owing or to her did any ways belong, and to pay the debts in which the said deceased stood obliged, so far forth, as the goods, chattels, rights and credits will extend according to their rate and order of law, especially of well and truly administering the goods, rights, and credits of the said deceased, and make a true and perfect inventory there-of and exhibiting the same into the Register’s office at the town of Reading, in the County of Berks, at or before the nineteenth day of January next, and render a true and just account, calculation  or reckoning of the said administration, at or before the nineteenth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and five. And also, I do by these precepts ordain, constitute and appoint you the said Henry Groh sole administrator of all and singular the goods, chattels, rights and credits which were of the deceased, within the limits aforesaid, saving harmless and forever indemnifying me and all other officers against all persons whatsoever by reason of your administration aforesaid and saving to all others their rights. In Testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal of office the nineteenth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and five. (Signed)

 

Children  of Simon Groh and Anna Catherine Kanter are:

1. Henry Groh,   b. 17 Nov 1764,   d. 4 Sep 1823

2. Maria Margaret Groh,   b. before 28 Apr 1771

 

Upper Tulpehocken Twp – Blue Mountain Church Records:

 

Maria Margret GROH, dau of Simon and wife, baptized 4/28/1771, spons: Casper LANG and wife

Simon GROH and ‘wife’ were sponsors at baptism of John Simon LANG, s/o Casper and wife, baptized on 3/8/1767.

Simon GROH and ‘wife’ also sponsored John Simon ALBERT, s/o Michael and wife, on 7/29/1770 at the same church.

Rebecca GROH, dau of Henry and wife, born 4/2/1790, baptized 5/13/1790, spons: Maria GROH

John GROH, dau of Henry and wife, born 4/3/1791, bp 4/26/1791, spons: John Marschall and Elizabeth

 

Marriages at Trinity Tulpehocken Reformed Church, Tulpehocken Twp:

Susanna GROH to Jacob WALTHER on 12/20/1770

 

Her will administered:

 

GROH, CATHARINE, widow, Tulpehocken.
December 19, 1804.
Adm. to Henry GROH, eldest son.

 

http://www.bergergirls.com/getperson.php?personID=I008113&tree=Strausstow

 

For Further Study: KANTNER-GANTNER-GANDER: ETC. FAMILY OF HANSWEILER IN THE PARISH OF JAEGERSBURG PFALZ: BAVARIA HOMBURG GERMANY IN 1660 AND TULPEHOCKEN TOWNSHIP BERKS CO.PA. BY WINIFRED MORSE MCLACNLAN 1989

 

Possible son?

 

Berks County Wills:

BAST, JOHN, Maxatawny.
May 22, 1783 - August 24, 1784. B - 96.
Provides for wife Magdalena.
To son Henry £10, besides what he has already rec'd.
To son Abraham £300.
To dau. Barbara wife of Jacob GROH, £74.

 

Hans Jacob Kanter

Abt. 1685-1742

Immigrant Ancestor

Hans Jacob Kanter

Jacob Kanter

Anna Catherine Kanter

Henry Kroh

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hans Jacob Kanter (1)was born about 1685, Hahnweiler, Birkenfeld, Rheinland-Pfalz, Deutschland.  Hans was the son of Hans Kantner and Maria Catharina (Unknown). He married Anna Maria Catherina Lutz 27 Nov 1710 in Waldmohr, Kusel, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. Hans died  20 Apr 1742, Berks County, PA.

 

German: metonymic occupational name for a cooper, from Middle High German ganter, kanter ‘barrel rack’.

 

Hans and Anna Maria immigrated to America with (likely) at least four of their young children.

 

Children of Hans Jacob Kanter and  Anna Maria Catherina Lutz are:

 

  1. Anna Magdalena Kantner,   b. 17 Jan 1712
  2. Anna Elisabetha Kantner,   b. 9 Jul 1714
  3. Jacob Kantner,   b. before 28 Apr 1716, Hahnweiler, Birkenfeld, Rheinland-Pfalz, Deutschland,   d. before 29 Mar 1773, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania
  4. George Kantner,   b. 9 Nov 1719, Hahnweiler, Birkenfeld, Rheinland-Pfalz, Deutschland ,   d. 1 Feb 1782, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania
  5. Nicholas Kanter,   b. 21 Feb 1724
  6. Mary Martha Ketner,   b. 31 Jul 1725,   d. about 1808
  7. Margareta Lousia Kantner,   b. 10 Apr 1729

 

Strausstown Roots

 (Johannes) Jacob Kantner

1716-1791

Immigrant Ancestor

Farmer

Johannes Jacob Kanter

Anna Catherine Kanter

Henry Kroh

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Johannes Kantner (Hans1) (AKA Kanter)was born Bef. 28 Apr 1716 Hahnweiler, Birkenfeld, Rheinland-Pfalz, Deutschland, christened 28 Apr 1716, Waldmohr Church, Pfalz, Germany. He married Susannah Hubler . Jacob died intestate in 1791 in Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania.

CENSUS YEAR: 1790    STATE: PA    COUNTY: Berks    DISTRICT: Brunswig of Manheim 
Page      Line       Head of Household                  Males 16+    Males 16-    Females
278  18   Kantner Jacob      3    4    5   
 
On the list: Warrantees of Land in the County of Berks, 1752-1890, Jacob Kanter was one of the largest land owners, with 135 acres as of Dec. 31, 1789, and another Jacob (possibly his son?) had 45.120 acres as of April 7, 1785.
 

Occupation: Farmer Religion: Lutheran

The winter of 1708-09 was the worst in Europe in more than a century. The intense cold started in Oct and cont. to end of April, destroying the grape vines and fruit trees in SW Germany. The disaster was total and the future without hope. Contemporary accounts claimed “birds died in the air and spittle leaving the mouth was ice before it reached the ground.”

By 1708 the “Palatines” started to arrive in London, via Rotterdam, and in 1709 over 30,000 arrived between May and October. They went to England planning to immediately move on to PA and the Carolinas. These colonies had people talking up the good land and low taxes.

The German immigrants were the second the enter this section of territory The first settlement by them was effected in 1710, along the Manatawny, in Oley. Many arrived within the next decade. To the east of the Schuylkill river, they proceeded northwardly from Philadelphia. To the west, however, the first colony of Germans, before 1730 entered from the west, proceeding from New York southwardly and from the Susquehanna river eastwardly into Tulpehocken Valley. The total number of Germans who settled in the county previous to 1752 cannot be estimated, but they were certainly more numerous than all the other nationalities taken together. In 1747 Governor Thomas stated that the Germans of Pennsylvania comprised three-fifths of the whole population, or about one hundred and twenty thousand.

Many of them were redemptioners, or person who had bound themselves or one or more of their children to the masters of vessels, upon their arrival, for a term of years, to pay for their passage across the ocean. The usual terms of sale depended upon the age, strength, and health of the persons sold. Boys and girls generally served from five to ten years. Many parents were compelled to sell the service of their children to satisfy their passage-money, so that they might be released from the vessel upon which they were brought to this country. Children under five years of age could not be sold to service. They were disposed of gratuitously to persons who agreed to raise them and give them their freedom when they attained the age of twenty-one years. In this manner the redemptioners came to occupy a very humble position; but “from this class there have sprung some of the most reputable and wealthy inhabitants of the province.”

Prior to 1727, most of them brought considerable means, but afterwards, many of them were poor, and they came to be redemptioners on that account. The years in which they arrived were 1728, 1729, 1737, 1741, 1750, and 1751. The principal part of them were farmers; but many were mechanics who brought with them a knowledge of those arts which are necessary and useful in all countries, comprising carpenters and builders, weavers, tailors, tanners, shoemakers (cordwainers), comb-makers, smiths of all kinds, butchers, paper-makers and clock-makers. They became perfect mechanics and workmen through a custom of “Peregrination” (Wanderschaft), which as young men, just after the close of their apprenticeship, they carried on for one or more years in order to make themselves more proficient in their several trades. This was required of young mechanics before they were permitted to set up for themselves. By this course, they were afforded opportunities of acquiring much useful knowledge which books could not supply, besides proficiency in their trade. They were called “Traveling Journeymen” (Handweks-Bursch).

This was the class of Germans which settled the country along the Schuylkill and its tributaries. They were a valuable acquisition to William Penn and his sons in the development of their great province. They were just what a new country needed to start it grandly in the march of material progress. Their labor, economy, perseverance and stability added great and increasing wealth to the country. In this manner they prepared the way for the erection of a new county, and having thus fitted the settlements for a separate political organization they proceeded earnestly in behalf of its establishment.

The Germans were along every stream excepting the Wyomissing, Allegheny, and Hay creek in the southern section. They were in the valleys and on the hills rather than along the Schuylkill. This selection of localities was not accidental, for they found the best quality of land away from the Schuylkill. The best farms in productiveness and appearance are in the localities where they settled – in Oley, in Maxatawny, and in Heidelberg. And in these respective localities we still find the grandchildren and great-grandchildren of the first German patentees.

And the Germans were extreme Revolutionists, having encouraged the war for Independence to the utmost of their ability. Their conduct was admirable through the whole trying period, and when the great struggle was successfully ended, with the acquisition of increased power to the people, they naturally asserted their rights and took elective offices to themselves.

Tulpewihaki means “Land of turtles” now called Tulpehocken

 

Wills were filed in Berks County for:

 

KANTNER, Jacob

Berks Manheim  June 15, 1791 A4-201 Susanna the widow Administrator

 

KANTNER, Susanna

Berks Manheim 1804 A6-143 Administration to son John

 

Children of Johan (Johannes) Jacob Kanter and Susannah Hubler:

 

1. Anna Catherine Kantner, b. 17 Oct 1741, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, d. 4 Dec 1804, South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania m. Simon Groh

2. Jacob Kantner,   b. 9 May 1743, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania  d. before 15 Jun 1791, South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania 3.Margaret Kantner,   b. about 1747, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania d. 13 Aug 1825, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County,

4. Apollonia Kantner,   b. about 1749, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

5. John Kantner,   b. 9 May 1751,   d. 1 Jul 1833, South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania

6. Christine Kantner,   b. 28 Mar 1755, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania,   d. 13 Nov 1838, Germantown, Montgomery County, Ohio

7. Nicholas Kantner,   b. 20 Nov 1757,   d. 18 Jun 1840, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

8. George Kantner,   b. about 1761, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania d. 26 May 1816, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania 9. Elizabeth Kantner,   b.

9 Jul 1762,   d. 12 Apr 1814, Bethel Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

10. Catharine Kantner,   b. before 7 Dec 1766

 

http://www.bergergirls.com/getperson.php?personID=I008085&tree=Strausstown

 

http://www.bergergirls.com/getperson.php?personID=I008113&tree=Strausstown

Abstracts of Berks County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1785-1800, Volume 2 By Jacob Martin, John P. Smith Pg 68

From Pioneers and Patriots “Over the Blue Mountain” Vol 1 – revised copyright 1994 F. Richard Turnbach

 

Extracts of Selected Wills, Estates, Realty, and Orphan’s Court Actions of

potential interest to Schuylkill researchers

 

Military: Schuylkill County PA Patriots of the American Revolution:

A list of persons known or believed to have served in the American Revolution, and who resided in those areas of Berks and Northampton Counties that are now Schuylkill County Pennsylvania.

Patriot, approximate date of death, cemetery or last known area of residence, sources and references.

 

KANTNER, Jacob Berks Manheim 1791, KANTNER, Johannes 1 Jul1833  Jerusalem SH 1780 Capt Christof Baldi Co,  Kanter, Johannes and Kanter, Jacob all fought in the Revolutionary War. I am not sure where (or if) they fit into the family.

 

Katharina Kerschner

1721-Aft.1759

Immigrant Ancestress

Mother of Eight

Katharina Kerschner

Dorothea Hager

Elizabeth Kiesecker

Sara Tice

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Katharina Kerschner(1) AKA“Katrina” Kerschner was born in 1721 in Langenselbold, Hesse Kassel, Germany to Henrich Kerschner and Elizabeth (Unknown). She married David Hager.  Katharina died Aft. 1759 in Elisabeth’s-Town, Frederick County, MD

 

In the period when Katharina was having her children, they were not commonly delivered in the bed. They were usually delivered on a straw mat which could be burned after the messy business was concluded. A midwife was usually present, not a doctor. Cesarean sections were known about, but usually only performed after the death of the mother, to deliver the child. Death of the mother or the child during childbirth was not uncommon.

 

Children of Katharina Kerchner and David Hager are:

 

  1. David Hager, Jr. b: AFT 1739 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  2. Maria Katharina Hager b: 1 DEC 1740 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  3. Johannes “John” Hager  b: 1742 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  4. Johann Michael Hager b: 1743 in Hagerstown, Washington (Frederick) Co, MD
  5. Elisabeth Hager b: 1749 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  6. Susannah Pauline Hager b: ABT 1750 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  7. Dorothea Hager b: ABT 1751 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD
  8. Sarah Katharina Hager b: ABT 1759 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD

 

Elizabeth Kiesecker

1773-

Elizabeth Kiesecker

Sara Tice

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

1     

Elizabeth (Philip 2, Philip1 ) was born in 1773, the daughter of Dorothea Hager and Philip Kiesecker, Jr . Elizabeth married John Tice (Diess/Theiss)16 Nov 1794, in Hagerstown, Maryland.

 

Children of Elizabeth Kiesecker and John Tice are:

 

1. John TICE , Jr. b: 1789 in Hagerstown, Washington Co, MD

2. Mary TICE b: AFT 1792 in Washington Co, MD

3. Eliza TICE b: BET 1795 AND 1810 in Washington Co, MD

4. Sara Tice, b. 18 Oct 1801, Hagerstown, Maryland, d. 06 Sep 1838, Tiffin, Ohio.

5. Henry Kiesecker TICE b: 17 OCT 1810 in Washington Co, MD

6. William M. TICE b: AFT 1811 in Washington Co, MD

Philip Kiesecker

Immigrant Ancestor

1719-Abt 1777

Philip Kiesecker

Philip Kiesecker , Jr.

Elizabeth Kiesecker

Sara Tice

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Philip Kiesecker (1) was born in 1719 in Germany. He married Margaretha (Unknown) about 1744 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Philip died about 1777 in Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland.

 

In the book List of Foreigners who took the oath of allegence, “Philip Keesecker” is listed on page 396. He came to America on the Neptune, John Mason, Master, Departed from Rotterdam and Qualified Sept 24, 1754.

 

There is a “Simon Kiesecker” active in PA, who was born May 20, 1747 in Wertheim, Germany, and died August 25, 1818 in Hagerstown, Wash., MD. He is possibly another son of Philip’s, and I have no doubt he is a relative of some sort, as Philip Jr and his wife sponsored Simon’s son John Jacob at his baptism in 1792. Simon married “Maria” Elisabeth Kattermann, and they had a son also named Philip, who was born in about 1792.

 

Children of Philip Kiesecker and Margaretha are:

 

  1. Philip Kiesecker Jr : born about 1751 in Lancaster Co, PA., married Dorothea Hager, and died in 1821.

 

Philip Kiesecker, Jr.

Abt.1751-1821

Philip Kiesecker , Jr.

Elizabeth Kiesecker

Sara Tice

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Philip Kiesecker Jr (Philip1 ) was born about 1751 in Lancaster Co, PA. to Philip Kiesecker and Margaretha (Unknown). Philip married Dorothea Hager, and died in 1821.

 

Philip and his wife Dorothea Hager sponsored John Jacob (of Simon Kiesieker [possible brother] and Elisabeth b. 20 Dec 1792) who was baptized 13Feb 1793. (Evangelical Lutheran Church at Elizabethtown) .

 

I can’t find much on Philip, but there was a Philip Kiesecker in Jackson Township, Lebanon County PA in Index to Township Warrantee Booklets by James B. Wolfson.

 

At that time in our history, the ending “Jr.” did not always mean that his father’s name was Philip Kiesecker (altho in this case, it did); it just meant that there was another person of that name in the area, who was older than the “Jr.”  

 

The children of Philip Kiesecker Jr and Dorothea Hager are:

 

  1. Elizabeth Kiesecker b. 1773 married John Tice 16 Nov 1794, in Hagerstown, Maryland.

 

Also spelled:

Keesecker, Kissecker, Kersher

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

1884-1961

Farmer

 

Alfred Alonzo Kroh (Jacob5, Daniel4, Jacob3,Henry 2, Simon1) was the son of Jacob Henry Kroh and Francis Parmelee. He was born 13 Apr 1884 in Hillsdale, MI. He was a twin. He married (1) Gladys Katherine Burdick, daughter of Jay Burton Burdick and Ida May Ellsworth on 17 Aug 1910 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. O.C. Nash, Hillsdale, MI. He married (2) Edna Mary (Coles) Cox in 1960. He died 07 Jun 1961 in Hillsdale, MI and is buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Jefferson TWP, Osseo, MI

 

Alfred Kroh was born April 13, 1884, one of a set of twins. He was born on the farm of his father, Daniel Kroh in Jefferson Township, which was located about ten miles south east of Hillsdale, MI. It was a clapboard home that his grandfather had built, way back in the woods. It was by a big sorghum mill and apple jelly factory that was run by his father. He went to school at the “Brick School”, which was located about 1 ½ miles south west of his home. It was a one room school house, which was also attended by his daughters and his granddaughter Pat Pressler in later years. When he was fourteen years of age, the family moved to a farm north west of their former home.   He attended high school in Hillsdale Michigan, and left school in the tenth grade to work with his father in the family farm and cider mill.

 

When Alfred and his twin Wilfred were small, they were holy terrors. One day while their Grandmother was baby sitting for them while their mother went into town, they got into the fresh blueberry pie, and then ran away. On that day, one of the little local boys was to be buried. One of the townspeople found the two, and asked what they were up to. They replied, “We’re going to see the little dead boy.”

 

They were known to pull the feathers off of live chickens and cut the tails off of cats. Their mother often said, “What one didn’t think of, the other one did.”

 

He became quite a prosperous farmer. When he dabbled in Real Estate, he would purchase homes, fix them up and then resell them.

 

At the age of twenty six, he met Miss Gladys K. Burdick, a teacher from the area. They met in October, 1909 at party at a friend’s home. On November 6th of that year, they went to a box social at the South Jefferson Grange Hall. It was there that they first “admitted they cared for each other”. They became engaged the last of November. Alfred proposed to Gladys in a buggy, sitting in front of the home of Ed Foust. “Al” asked if she would like to be his “life’s mate”.

 

When they were dating they used to go cutter riding. Gladys enjoyed the sound of the sleigh bells behind Moxie, the horse who pulled the cutter. (A cutter is a small sleigh, see image.) They were in two accidents in the cutter, caused by Moxie bolting. One caused a broken collar bone in Auntie Nash, Gladys’ guardian. Al visited Gladys at her Aunt Belle’s (Belle Ellsworth Rockwell, sister of her father Jay). They enjoyed a big Fourth of July fireworks party, complete with ice cream.

 

They were married the following August, on the 17th at the home of Gladys’ guardians, the Nashes, who were her aunt and uncle. The wedding was performed by the Reverend D.B. Martin.  Alfred was of the Protestant faith. On their honeymoon, they traveled Lower Michigan. After their marriage they resided for eight months with his family. Their daughter Ruth says they actually went as far as Niagara Falls on their honeymoon. After the wedding, they traveled in a horse and buggy to North Adams, and spent the night in a big hotel, which has since been turned into a funeral home. From there, they journeyed by train.

 

April 30, 1911 the couple moved to a farm house (“Brick House”, ½ mile south of Blount School in Jefferson Twp.)where they lived until December 1, 1916, when they moved to 236 West Street in Hillsdale, MI. They sold that in exchange for a lot in Detroit and a contract. They moved to Detroit when their daughter Alfreda was in the second grade.  They moved around a lot, back and forth from Detroit.

 

In 1914, Alfred went to Buffalo with a car of cattle. The Christmas of 1914, they spent with Alfred’s mother, and from there they took a sleigh into Hillsdale, taking a Christmas tree with them. In 1918, Alfred got the mumps. Alfred and Gladys had three lovely and much loved daughters; Ruth, Virginia, and Alfreda.

 

The Kroh family was tightly knit, and when the Great Depression hit, they grew even closer. While turmoil, hardship and strife were going on around them, daughter Alfreda was able to recall a loving, warm, and wonderful childhood. Each of the three sisters had many stories to tell. especially about their father’s search for work, and his many absences from home. He frequently made the 100 mile journey to Detroit to sell the farm’s apples on street corners or sell real estate. His daughters were proud of the fact that he was inventive and resourceful, and would do whatever it took to provide for his small family.  At various times he not only sold real estate and apples, he sold everything in between, including cars, paint, Dodge cars and bootlegged alcohol. He had “white lightning” hidden all over the house, including inside the piano. He became a mechanic, and worked for Dodge in Hillsdale (now the Dawn Theatre), invented gadgets and rummaged in dumps. At one time he worked for his brother Wilfred, in a construction firm. They would build houses and then rent them out.  It was Alfred’s job to collect the rents.  According to Ruth, Wilfred’s son, Alfred Marvin would sometimes go to the houses and give the name “Alfred”, and the renters gave him their rent money.  When the scheme came out, Alfred Alonzo went to jail for embezzlement of funds, instead of the rightful culprit, Alfred Marvin. The families never got on well after that. I am sure A. Marvin’s family has a different tale to tell.

 

His daughters laughed when they recalled his love of a bargain, and his grandchildren of today remember him trying to get people to lower whatever price they were asking. Even though they knew that others were going hungry, they always had enough to eat. Their grandparents (Jacob Henry and Frances Kroh) had a farm, and would always bring food with them on their frequent visits. They would bring milk, eggs, vegetables and sometimes a chicken. The family took in a homeless man by the name of Edgar Phillapy, who lived at the farm for the rest of his life, becoming “Uncle Ed” to the family’s children and grandchildren.

 

Alfred’s daughter Alfreda (“Frizi”)* recalled stories of gifts she received from parents who could ill afford to give them. One gift in particular that touched her was a necklace which she had seen in a store window. She loved the necklace and talked about it frequently, even though she knew her parents could not afford it. The following Christmas, after all the meager gifts had been opened and exclaimed over with delight, another small box was found with Alfreda’s name attached.  Sixty years after opening that tiny box which contained the necklace she so loved, she not only remembers how she felt when she received it, she also could vividly recall the look of love on the faces of her parents. It was second nature for the family to sacrifice something for themselves to bring joy to those they loved.

 

Alfred loved shredded wheat, and had to have two fried in butter every morning for breakfast. He would take the large biscuits, run a bit of water thru the middle, and fry them.  He had to have two of everything…eggs, bacon, toast, and would declare, “It takes two to make a pair!” Another of his favorite expressions, when asked how he was doing was, “Able to sit up and take nourishment.”  He loved to garden, and had a good sense of humor. Alfred was a farmer, his farm being located on Lake Pleasant Road in Osseo, MI, Hillsdale County. He was a good neighbor, and helped others in the area with their crops. He was known as “Gobby Al” to his grandchildren. He collected stuffed and ceramic frogs.  Al loved to stop at junk yards, and find things to either fix or to nail them to a tree in his front yard. His tree was covered with all sorts of things that had caught his fancy. Grandson Michael remembers him nailing hubcaps to his tree.  Michael and his cousins and siblings love to tell how their “Gobby Al” would be exhausted after a day’s work, but was never too tired to tell them stories he made up. Their favorites were the stories he made up about “Whitey and Pinky the Alligators”. In his later years, Alfred lived in a mobile home in Jefferson Township. He kept his love of a good bargain until the day he died.

 

He was an active member of the South Jefferson Grange, occupying the “Worthy Master’s chair for four years, and was involved with the Oddfellows

 

Alfred was (at age 30) five foot eight inches tall, with dark hazel eyes and black hair. He died of pancreatic cancer at the age of 77.  See his will here. Please see article on Memories of Grandpa byCara Baker Osmin.
Children of Alfred Alonzo Kroh and Gladys Katherine Burdick are:

 

1. Ruth Estelle Kroh, b. 10 Jun 1911, Pleasant Lake Rd. Osseo, Hillsdale County, MI, d. 04  Oct 1992, Fort Worth, TX. M. Lyle Robert Baker

2. Virginia Marguerite Kroh.

3. Alfreda Marie Kroh, b. 21 Aug 1917, Hillsdale, Michigan, d. 25 Jan 2000, Scottsdale, Arizona (Hospice).

 

See Alfred and Wilfred’s family trees here.

 

.Title: Compendium of history and biography of Hillsdale County, Michigan Elon G. Reynolds, editor.

Publication Info: Chicago : A.W. Bowen & Co., [1903?].

 

Title: Portrait and biographical album of Hillsdale county, Mich., containing full page portraits and biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens of

the county, together with portraits and biographies of all the governors of the state, and of the presidents of the United States.

Publication Info: Chicago,: Chapman brothers, 1888

Fritzi’s Daughter Mary Ellen contributed the memory section for her mother and sisters.

Daniel Bernard Kroh

1832-1916

Hog Farmer, Steam Works Owner

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Daniel Bernard Kroh (Jacob3,Henry 2, Simon1) was the son of Jacob Kroh and Sara Tice and was born 26 Feb 1832 near Tiffin, Ohio. He married Hanna L. Shepard on 26 Feb 1856 in Tiffin, Ohio. Daniel died February 10, 1916 and is buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Hillsdale Township, MI. His granddaughter Gladys gives the date of death as January 24, 1916.

 

 

I am not sure the photo on the far left is Daniel Kroh; it is a best guess.

 

 

Daniel B. Kroh, proprietor of the South Jefferson Steam Evaporating Works, established in 1884, is familiarly known throughout this township and vicinity as one of its most enterprising men. He first opened his eyes to the light over fifty-six years ago, in Seneca County, Ohio, the exact date of his birth being Feb. 26, 1832. Our subject is the scion of excellent and substantial ancestry, being the son of Jacob and Sarah (Tice) Kroh, who were natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Virginia, and of German ancestry. Daniel B., our subject, was the sixth child of the first marriage of his father, Jacob. The boyhood days of Daniel B. Kroh were spent upon the farm of his father, and when twenty-four years of age he started out for himself. He was married, March 13, 1856, to Miss Hanna L. Shepard.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Kroh after their marriage lived on the home farm about one year, then removed to Wyandot County, where Mr. K. purchased forty acres of land, upon which he farmed four years, then selling out came to Hillsdale county in 1861. He was one of the early settlers of the county, having cleared the stumps from his land and build a log house in which to live. He had previously purchased seventy-nine acres of land in Jefferson Township, which is now included in his present homestead. To this he added until he now has 120 acres with good improvements, the land in a highly productive condition, and the buildings convenient and substantial. A well eight feet deep supplies all the water for his evaporating works, while an artesian well eleven feet deep, near the dwelling, is utilized in the cooling of milk. Another well in a field adjacent, and sixteen feet deep, supplies an abundance of water for his live stock. He makes a specialty of full-blooded ChesterWhite hogs.

 

They are devout and zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Daniel joined the church in 1872. Their family consisted of three children, their son, J. H. Kroh, their daughter, Mina L., wife of W. E. Freed, of this county, and another son, William, who is now deceased.

 

To our subject and his wife there were born three children, Henry J (Actually, it was J. Henry)., the eldest, Jan. 21, 1857, in Seneca County, Ohio. This son was married on the 3d of May, 1882, to Miss Frances, daughter of Alonzo and Ophelia (Russell) Parmelee, and is the father of twin boys, Wilford and Alfred, born April 13, 1884, and stout, healthy boys, who are the pride of their grandparents as well as their nearer progenitors. The second son, William A., was born in Wyandot County, Ohio, and was drowned in a well on the present homestead when about two years old; Mina L. was born July 8, 1868, and was married, Dec. 1, 1887, to William Freed, of Adams Township, this county.

 

Mr. Kroh, politically, is a full-fledged Democrat. He east his first vote for Franklin Pierce a short time before reaching his majority, and although taking a lively interest in the success of the principles of his party, has never been desirous of the responsibilities of office. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since a young man, officiating as Steward for about fifteen years, and has also been Superintendent of the Sunday-school several years.

 

The evaporating works of Mr. Kroh are used principally for the preservation of fruit, although he is prepared to handle sugar water, and by the same power-the boiler forty-horse power and the engine twenty-is also equipped for the sawing of fence slats, to the number of 4,000 per day. In their fruit operations they dispose of 35 bushels of apples, pared and cored, per day, sorghum 250 gallons, and cider 50 barrels, made into jelly and apple butter direct from the fruit. This industry promises to become one of the most important in the county, being one which was very much needed by the people of this section, and which they are already beginning to appreciate at its full value.

 

Mr. Kroh is a very genial and companionable man, and his straightforward methods of doing business have made him a general favorite in his community, and there are none who would not be pleased to see him succeed in this new enterprise, which gives every promise of this result.

 

Daniel Bernard Kroh with two of his children, Mina and a playful Jacob Henry

At his death at about age 90, he was a widower, living in Jefferson Township, about five miles south of Osseo, MI, where he had lived for nearly fifty years. He had been in poor health for some time, and died of apoplexy. (Historically, the word “apoplexy” was also used to describe any sudden death that began with a sudden loss of consciousness, especially one in which the victim died within a matter of seconds after losing consciousness. The word “apoplexy” may have been used to describe the symptom of sudden loss of consciousness immediately preceding death and not an actual verified disease process.)

 

The morning of his death, he got up in the morning and built a fire, and went back to bed while he waited for the house to warm up. Later he was found dead by his housekeeper, Mrs. Bowen. He will be remembered for his cheerful, smiling face and kind words.

 

The funeral was held at the home of his son, Jacob Henry Kroh.

 

Daniel was twenty-eight years of age when Lincoln became President.
More About Daniel Bernard Kroh and Hanna L. Shepard:
Alternate marriage date: 13 Mar 1856
Marriage: 26 Feb 1856, Tiffin, Ohio.

Children of Daniel Bernard Kroh and Hanna L. Shepard are:

 

1. Jacob Henry Kroh, b. 21 Jan 1857, Seneca Co., Ohio, d. August 30, 1945, Hillsdale, Michigan.

2. William Alvin Kroh, b. 02 May 1860, Seneca Co., Ohio, d. 10 Jun 1862, Hillsdale, Michigan. (Drowned in well)

3. Almina (Mina) Kroh, b. 18 Jul 1868, Hillsdale, Michigan, d. 20 Feb 1920.m. William Cosway of Cambria, MI

 

Steamworks:

Title: Atlas of Hillsdale County, Michigan

Author:  Lake, D. J.

Publication Info: Philadelphia : C.O. Titus, 1872.

 

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/micounty/

 

Henry Kroh

1764-1823

Henry Kroh

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Henry Kroh (Simon1) was the son of Simon Kroh (Groh) and Anna Catherine Kantner (AKA Cudner),  born 12 Nov 1764 in Berks Co., Pennsylvania, and died 04 Sep 1823 in Martinsburg, VA. He married Anna Barbara Reichart (AKA Richard) on 16 May 1787 in Berks Co., Pennsylvania, daughter of Barbara Metzger Von Weibnom and (Unknown) Richard/Reichard.

Henry Kroh House Martinsburg, WV
This early Greek Revival house was built in 1819. Doors on both floors have side-lights and wide transoms supported by Doric columns. The one-story, one-bay entrance porch had a flat roof and originally had a balustrade. The ell has a two-tiered recessed porch.  See more photos on page 380 here.

See his decendants here: Decendants of Henry Kroh

Henry KROH & Christine KROH (mother of Henry) sponsored “Christine” born Aug 26, 1785 daughter of George Adam KROH & Wife

 

From :Fathers of the First German Reformed Church in Europe and America Vol 4.

 

Henry Kroh (referring to the son of Henry Kroh and Anna Barbara) was born on the 17th day of June, 1799, near Womelsdorf, in Tulpehocken township, Berks county, Pennsylvania. His parents were Henry Kroh, and Barbara, whose maiden name was Reichart. When yet quite young he was baptized by the late Rev. Dr. William Hendel—the younger. His parents subsequently removed thence into the vicinity of Martinsburg, Virginia, where he was confirmed by the Rev. Dr. Lewis Mayer, at the age of sixteen.

 
CENSUS YEAR: 1790    STATE: PA    COUNTY: Berks    DISTRICT: Tulschocken

131  26   Groh            Henry               pg0125.txt
Page   Line   Head of Household            Males 16+ Males 16- Females
131  26   Groh,Henry               1    0    3

 

Events during the life of Henry Kroh

Boston Massacre (1770)
Boston Tea Party (1773)
First Continental Congress (1774)
Patrick Henry gives his “Give me Liberty” speech( 1775)
Paul Revere rides (1775)
Battle of Bunker Hill (1775)
Declaration of Independence (1776)
Washington crosses Delaware (1776)
Congress adopts the Stars and Stripes (1777)
John Paul Jones defeats Serapis (1779)
Noah Webster publishes the “American Spelling Book”
George Washington chosen as 1st US President
Bill of Rights written (1791)
War of 1812 (1812)
British burn the White House and the Capitol (1814)
Frances Scott Key writes the Star Spangled Banner (1814)

 

 

Estate Administration: GROH, HENRY, (of) Rockland March 4, 1816.Adm. Daniel FOLCK, friend. The widow renounced.
Children of Henry Kroh and Anna Barbara Richard are:

 

  1. Rebecca Kroh, b. 02 Apr 1790, Berks Co., Pennsylvania, d. 18 Apr 1866, Wabash Co., Illinois.
  2. John Kroh, b. May 1790, d. 1850, Rochester, Illinois.
  3. Catharine Kroh, b. 30 Sep 1792, d. 16 Apr 1840, Mercersburg, Virginia.
  4. Jacob Kroh, b. 12 Dec 1794, Martinsburg, VA, d. 10 Apr 1856, Tiffin, Ohio.
  5. Esther Kroh, b. 29 Dec 1796, Martinsburg, VA, d. 30 Aug 1823, Martinsburg, VA.
  6. Henry Kroh, (See above) b. 12 Jun 1799, Berks Co., Pennsylvania, d. 15 Dec 1869, Stockton, California.
  7. Simon Kroh, b. 11 Oct 1801, Berks Co., Pennsylvania, d. 1876, Welsh Run, Pennsylvania.
  8. Johnathan Kroh, b. 17 Dec 1804, Berkeley Co., Virginia, d. 1872, Friendsville, Illinois.
  9. Mary Ann Kroh, b. 22 Jun 1807, Berkeley Co., Virginia, d. 26 Oct 1881, Three Rivers, Michigan.
  10. Daniel Kroh, b. 30 Oct 1809, Berkeley Co., Virginia, d. 27 Jun 1897, Saginaw, Michigan.

 

 

 

 

Jacob Kroh

1794- 1856

Fought in the War of 1812

Farmer, Justice of the Peace

Father of Eighteen Children

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

 

Jacob Kroh (,Henry 2, Simon1) was the son of Henry Kroh and Anna Barbara Richard. He was born 12 Dec 1794 in Martinsburg, VA, and died 10 Apr 1856 in Tiffin, Ohio. He married (1) Sara Tice (daughter of John Tice and Elizabeth Kiesecker) on 20 Apr 1820 in Hagerstown, Maryland. After her death, he married (2) Margaret Mercer (b. 1814) on 15 Apr 1841 in Tiffin, Ohio.

 

Jacob Kroh was born Dec. 12, 1794, and at the time of the burning of Washington* he concluded that he was old enough to aid his country, and accordingly, saddling his own horse, started out for the seat of war.

 

About 1827 the father of our subject went with his family to Ohio, and was among the early settlers of Seneca County. He assisted in building the first German Reformed Church, at Tiffin, in that county, and subsequently was the first Treasurer and Secretary of the Heidelburg College established there. He was also Treasurer of the American Bible Society, which place he was filling at the time of his death. In addition to this he served as Justice of the Peace many years, and held various other township offices.

 

Politically, he was an old-line Democrat, and maintained his principles with all the natural strength of his character.

 

Jacob Kroh was twice married and the father of seventeen children, eleven of whom were living at the time of his death. He died in Seneca County, Ohio, April 10, 1856, and his wife Sara Tice who was born Oct. 18, 1810, preceded her husband to the silent land, her death taking place Sept. 6, 1838.

 

Jacob Kroh started in life with a capital of a few hundred dollars, but at the time of his decease was one of the wealthiest men of Seneca County. He gave to each of his children a liberal education, and some of them occupied themselves afterward as teachers. They were also prominent and worthy citizens, the result of their careful home training, and their natural inheritance of principles of uprightness and strict integrity.

 

*The Burning of Washington was a battle that took place on August 24, 1814, during the War of 1812 between the British Empire and the United States of America. The British Army occupied Washington, D.C. and set fire to many public buildings following the American defeat at the Battle of Bladensburg. The facilities of the U.S. government, including the White House and U.S. Capitol, were largely destroyed.
Children of Jacob Kroh and Sara Tice are:

 

  1. Eliza Ann Kroh, b. 19 Jan 1821, Berkley Co., Virginia, d. 22 Oct 1898, Norwalk, Ohio.
  2. Catharine Henryeta Kroh, b. 06 Feb 1822, Berkley Co., Virginia, d. 30 Aug 1826, Martinsburg, Virginia.
  3. Harrison Tice Kroh, b. 03 Nov 1823, Berkley Co., Virginia, d. 25 Aug 1885, Wabash Co., Illinois.
  4. Mary Jane Kroh, b. 06 Jun 1825, Martinsburg, Virginia, d. date unknown.
  5. Sara Ellen Kroh, b. 17 Sep 1827, Martinsburg, Virginia, d. date unknown.
  6. Corinthe Kroh, b. 10 Jan 1830, Tiffin, Ohio, d. 28 Nov 1830, Tiffin, Ohio.
  7. Elizabeth Kroh, b. 10 Jan 1830, Tiffin, Ohio, d. date unknown.
  8. Daniel Bernard Kroh, b. 26 Feb 1832, Tiffin, Ohio, d. Feb 10, 1916
  9. Jacob Henry Kroh, b. 12 Oct 1833, Seneca Co., Ohio, d. 19 Mar 1895, Kokomo, Indiana.
  10. Martha Kroh, b. 10 Jun 1835, Tiffin, Ohio, d. 10 Jun 1835, Tiffin, Ohio.
  11. Samuel Kroh, b. 20 Jun 1836, Tiffin, Ohio, d. 20 Jun 1836, Tiffin, Ohio.
  12. David Kroh, b. 02 May 1837, Tiffin, Ohio, d. 14 May 1837, Tiffin, Ohio.
  13. Alma Kroh, b. 23 Jul 1838, Tiffin, Ohio, d. date unknown.

Children of Jacob Kroh and Margaret Mercer are:

 

  1. Markess Kroh, b. 04 Jan 1842, Tiffin, Ohio, d. 04 Jan 1842, Tiffin, Ohio.
  2. Emaline Kroh, b. 13 Feb 1843, Tiffin, Ohio, d. date unknown.
  3. Calvin Zwingli Kroh, b. 07 Mar 1845, Tiffin, Ohio, d. date unknown.
  4. Minerva Kroh, b. 27 Jan 1847, Tiffin, Ohio, d. 17 Apr 1847, Tiffin, Ohio.
  5. James Walter Kroh, b. 21 Dec 1849, Tiffin, Ohio, d. date unknown.

 

CENSUS YR:  1850  STATE or TERRITORY:  OH  COUNTY:  Seneca  DIVISION:  Seneca Township  REEL NO:  M432-728  PAGE NO:  1A
REFERENCE:  R. Crum 16-August-1850 HW Pg. 1
====================================================================================================================================
 LN  HN   FN  LAST NAME      FIRST NAME     AGE  SEX  RACE  OCCUP.         VAL.      BIRTHPLACE       MRD.  SCH.  R/W  DDB   REMARKS
====================================================================================================================================
 1   1    1 Kroh           Jacob          55    M    .    Farmer         7,000     Pa                .     .     .    .    .
 2   1    1 Kroh           Margaret       36    F    .    .              .         Va                .     .     .    .    .
 3   1    1 Kroh           Mary J         25    F    .    .              .         Va                .     .     .    .    .
 4   1    1 Kroh           Sarah E        22    F    .    .              .         Va                .     .     .    .    .
 5   1    1 Kroh           Elizabeth      20    F    .    .              .         O                 .     .     .    .    .
 6   1    1 Kroh           Danna B*        18    M    .    Farmer         .         O                 .     X     .    .    .
 7   1    1 Kroh           Jacob H        16    M    .    Farmer         .         O                 .     X     .    .    .
 8   1    1 Kroh           Alena****          12    F    .    .              .         O                 .     X     .    .    .
 9   1    1 Kroh           Carmeline**      7     F    .    .              .         O                 .     X     .    .    .
 10  1    1 Kroh           Cam Z***          5     M    .    .              .         O                 .     X     .    .    .
 11  1    1 Kroh           James W        8/12  M    .    .              .         O                 .     .     .    .    .
 12  1    1 Kroh           Mary W         45    F    .    .              .         Va

 

*I would have to imagine this is a badly spelled “Daniel B”. Either someone did not speak clearly, or someone had a hearing problem. Or, both.

** Emaline Kroh, b. 13 Feb 1843

***Perhaps this was Calvin Zwingli Kroh, b. 07 Mar 1845 (“Cal Z?”)

**** Alma

 

Kroh Cemetery, Located: in Seneca twp., Negrotown Rd. (CR 19)

Surname given name notes death date age at death

Kroh Jacob   10 Apr 1856 61y 3m 28d

Kroh Markess s/o J & M A 5 Jan 1852

Kroh Sarah w/o Jacob 6 Sep 1838 37y 11m

Kroh David s/o J & S 14 May 1837 12d

Kroh Samuel s/o J & S 20 Jun 1836 2 hrs

Kroh Martha d/o J & S 10 Jun 1835 2 hrs

Kroh Corinthia d/o J & S 28 Nov 1830 10m 18d

Kroh Minerva d/o J & MA 5 Apr 1847 2m 10d

 

L:Farmhouse of Jacob Kroh. Underneath the siding, it is made of huge logs.

Jacob Henry Kroh

1857-1945

Odd Fellow, Hog Farmer

 

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

 

 

 

Jacob Henry Kroh (Jacob5, Daniel4, Jacob3,Henry 2, Simon1) was the son of Daniel Bernard Kroh and Hanna L. Shepard. Jacob was born 21 Jan 1857 in Seneca Co., Ohio.  He married Francis W. Parmelee on 13 May 1883 in Ransom, MI.  Jacob died 30 AUG 1945 in Hillsdale, Michigan. He is buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Jefferson TWP, Osseo, MI

Jacob Henry Kroh, (who went by his middle name, and signed his name “J. Henry”) was one of the leading farmers of Jefferson township and a widely known breeder of pure Chester White hogs, was a native of Seneca county, Ohio, born near Tiffin on January 21, 1858, the son of Daniel and Hannah (Shepard) Kroh, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of New York. The family moved to Michigan in 1861 and settled in Jefferson township, where the father purchased eighty acres of land, partially cleared and improved, and added to this tract by a subsequent purchase forty more acres. He and his faithful wife still reside on this land, where they are passing the calm and peaceful evening of their lives, secure in the respect of all who know them and in enjoyment of the retrospect of well-spent industry in the                      development and progress of their adopted state.

 

The grandfather, also named Daniel Kroh*, was a native of Pennsylvania, who moved to Ohio when that state was new and undeveloped, and died there in Seneca county after a long life of usefulness as a progressive farmer. He had a family of twelve children, seven daughters and five sons, his son Daniel being the only one who became a resident of Hillsdale county.

 

J. H. Kroh has passed the whole of his life since he was three years of age in Hillsdale county and here received his education in its public schools. As soon as he was able, he took charge of the home farm and successfully conducted its operations until January I, I902, when he moved to the farm on which he now resides, which is a portion of section 28, in Jefferson township. Here he carries on a flourishing farming and. stock industry, giving special attention, as has been stated, to breeding Chester White hogs in large quantities and of excellent quality and purity. His product has a high rank in the markets, local and general, and he is known throughout an extensive sweep of country as one of the most judicious and intelligent stockbreeders in his line.

 

He also operates a large cider-mill in connection with his farming operations. By this enterprise he furnishes a great convenience, renders a valued service to the surrounding territory for many miles and provides another product of high grade for the use of mankind.

 

He was married in this county, in 1883, to Miss Susan Parmlee**, a native of the county and a daughter of Alonzo and Ophelia (Russell) Parmlee, early settlers in Ransom township, where the father died some years ago.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Kroh have two children, Wilford C. and Alfred A.

 

Although a Republican of firm and loyal faith in his party, Mr. Kroh has never been an active partisan and has never consented to accept a public office. He is a member of the order of Patrons of Husbandry, for five years has served as master of the local grange to which he belongs, and for a number of years prior to taking this position he was the overseer and steward of the grange. He also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is an active member of the Congregational church.

 

His granddaughter, Virginia Kroh Reed said that she remembers Jacob as being a very thrifty man, who would spend hours straightening bent nails. She could picture him peddling a whet stone to sharpen knives and other farm implements. One time he was hurt pretty badly by a sow that pitched into him, thinking he was going to hurt her “children”. They had carried a farm insurance policy for years, but every animal was mentioned except a pig. They dropped the insurance after that incident.

 

Jacob Henry Kroh’s death was caused by an enlarged heart and hardening of the arteries. His funeral was at Miner Funeral home in Hillsdale, Reverend Reider Offiating. Many lovely flowers were sent. He was buried beside his wife at Maple Grove Cemetary in Osseo, MI.

 

Children of Jacob Henry Kroh and Francis Parmelee are:

 

  1. Wilfred Kroh, b. 13 Apr 1884, Hillsdale, MI, d. 14 Sep 1940, Hillsdale, MI of Bright’s Disease and diabetes.
  2. Alfred Alonzo Kroh, b. 13 Apr 1884, Hillsdale, MI, d. 07 Jun 1961, Hillsdale, MI.

 

*Incorrect, the grandfather was also named JACOB.

** It was Frances Parmelee, not Susan Parmlee. However, her nick-name was “Sudie” or sometimes “Susie”.

 

 

 

 

Simon Kroh (Groh)

Bef 1740 – Bef. 22 Jun 1772

Immigrant Ancestor

(Johann) Simon Groh

Henry Kroh

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Simon Kroh (Groh) was born about 1740 (I would guess before, as he seemed to have come alone to America in 1749) and died before June 22, 1772.  He married Anna Catherine Kantner (according to some sources Catherine Cudner).

Johann Simon Groh came from Rotterdam Germany (stopping in Portsmouth, England) on the ship The Dragon in 1749. It is said that he came from Holland via Germany. His wife was called Catherine, his son’s name was Henry, and he lived in Berks Co., PA. He also had a daughter, Maria Margaret Groh,   b. before 28 Apr 1771.

 

Simon died intestate. The probate document reads as follows:

Benjamin Chew, Esquire  Register for the Probate of Wills and granting Letters of Administration in and for the Providence of Pennsylvania &c

.

To Catharine Groh, widow of Simon Groh later of the Township of Tupelhocken in the county of Berks in the said Province Yeoman deceased Greeting~

 

Whereas the said Simon Groh lately died Intestate (as is affirmed) having whilst he lived and at the time of his death drivers goods, chattels, rights and credits within the said county by means whereof the full disposition and power of granting the administration of all and singular the goods chattels, rights and credits which were the said deceased within the said county and also the auditing the accounts, calculations and reckonings  of the said administration and a final desmission from the same to me is manifestly known to belong. I desiring that the goods, chattels, rights and credits of the said deceased may be well and truly administered, do hereby grant to you the said Catherine Groh in whole fidelity in this behalf I very much concede full power by the tenor of these presents, to administer the goods, chattels, rights and credits which were of the said deceased within the said county; and also to ask, collect, levy recover and receive the credits whatsoever of the said deceased, which at the time of his death were owing or to him did any ways belong, and to pay the debts in which the said deceased stood obliged, so far forth, as the goods, chattels, rights and credits will extend according to their rate and order of law, especially of well and truly administering the goods, rights, and credits of the said deceased, and make a true and perfect inventory there-of and exhibiting the same into the Register’s office at the town of Reading, in the County of Berks, at or before the twenty second day of July next, and render a true and just account, calculation  or reckoning of the said administration, at or before the twenty second day of June in the year of our Lord one thousands seven hundred and seventy three. And also, I do by these precepts ordain, constitute and appoint you the said Catherine Groh sole administrator of all and singular the goods, chattels, rights and credits which were of the deceased, within the limits aforesaid, saving harmless and forever indemnifying me and all other officers against all persons whatsoever by reason of your administration aforesaid and saving to all others their rights. In Testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal of office the twenty second day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and severnty two. (Signed James……)

 

 

Oct. 17, 1749. Tfaf 3er, Quirttemnterger unb (tfffcher Famen mit bein cdif ratgon, (Yapitain Oaniet 9icoiad, ton 9Nottertbamn fiber Tortontoutt).-244 bit G0anjen. (Oct. 17, 1749. Palatines, Wirtembergers and Alsatians,(from Alsace,)-ship Dragon, Daniel Nicholas, Master, from Rotterdam, last from Portsmouth.-244 passengers.) Johan Simon Groh

 

GROH, SIMON, Tulpehocken.
June 22, 1772.
Adm. to Catharine GROH, the widow.

 

The name was changed to Kroh; changing spelling was common in those days. They did have more children, as a letter referred to Henry as the eldest son.  I have also seen this name spelled “Groah”.

 

131  26   Groh            Henry               pg0125.txt

CENSUS YEAR: 1790    STATE: PA    COUNTY: Berks    DISTRICT: Rockland

123  16   Groh            Jacob               pg0096.txt
Page   Line   Head of Household     Males 16+ Males 16- Females
123  16   Groh, Jacob                    1       3        2 
 
Life in Berks County, Pennsylvania

I have included photos of typical German farmhouses from the era.

It has been written that the Tulpehocken Settlement of 1723-1729 marked the beginning of one of the great population movements in Colonial America — the German migration to Pennsylvania. The original Tulpehocken settlers had formerly been part of a group of some 4000 Palatine Germans who colonized New York state under Governor Hunter in 1710.

Many Germans came from the fertile section of the Upper Rhine known as the Palatinate. The Thirty Years’ War had made this lovely land of rich fields a battleground. The people were weary of poverty and persecution and eagerly accepted William Penn’s invitation to come to Pennsylvania. They left their ruined homes by thousands and took passage on crowded, slow vessels, into which they were packed for weeks. Many of them were unable to pay their passage across the ocean so they sold their services for a number of years in exchange for passage to the ship’s captain. Agents of sailing companies often contracted to bring them to America where the agent had the right to sell the “redemptioneer’s” labor for a certain number of years to pay for his transportation. These “indentured servants” or “redemptioneers” were virtually slaves until the contract expired; they were, quite understandably, the first people in America to protest the slave traffic. Some immigrants served their masters for five years to pay a debt of only $48 and their lot was usually a hard one. Those who came to Berks County cleared the land, planted the fields, erected buildings, laid out roads, and turned the area into a smiling land of plenty. Though somewhat changed, the German language prevailed.

Unable to carry out the impractical plan of producing tar for the Queen’s Navy to pay their passage, or later to acquire land titles to farmland in the Schoharie Valley, a good portion of the Schoharie Community traveled by water to Tulpehocken in groups of fifteen to fifty families. Led by Conrad Weiser and others, these settlers also spread the news to their relatives in Germany that Pennsylvania offered freedom from religious intolerance and land that was reminiscent of the fertile valleys in the Palatinate. In the following decades the shipping lanes from Rotterdam to Philadelphia brought some 3,000 German immigrants bound for the interior of Pennsylvania. By 1752, when Berks County was founded, its population was overwhelmingly German, and the Pennsylvania German character of the region was established.

The Tulpehocken area was the first section of the county to be settled as a clustered colony. For this reason it was one of the first to establish a church. In 1725 Leonard Reed donated seven acres of ground for church, school, and burial purposes, at the present site of Reed’s Cemetery. The first log church was built in 1727 and the school organized in 1730. During its early years a struggle for control occurred involving community and church leaders. Conrad Weiser, a pious public spirited citizen (as well as Pennsylvania’s foremost spokesman and ambassador among the Indians) was embroiled in the rivalry between the Lutheran followers of John Caspar Stoever and the Moravian Congregation under Caspar Leutbecker both seeking exclusive occupancy of Reed’s Church, and the concurrent efforts of John Philip Boehm and John Peter Miller to establish a Reformed Congregation. One result of this “Tulpehocken Confusion” was the withdrawal in 1735 of Weiser, Miller, and Gottfried Fidler to the Cloisters at Ephrata, enticed by the magnetism of Conrad Beissel. In order to break ties to the past, an infamous “Burning of the Books” was performed at the Fidler Cabin in which 36 devotional books were burned in an act of cleansing and sacrifice. (What is it with Germans and book burning?)

Berks County is the ancestral home of Abraham Lincoln and the birthplace of Daniel Boone, the Kentucky pioneer. The two families lived near each other and were friends.

Berks is an abbreviation of Berkshire In England, where the Penn family had large estates. Reading, England, was the capital of Berkshire; consequently, the Penn’s selected the same name for the county seat of Berks when they laid out the city in 1748.

Shortly after his election as President, November 1793, George Washington was a guest in Reading on his return from Lebanon where he Inspected construction of the Union Canal. He also stopped at Womelsdorf and was deeply moved by the royal reception of the Berks County Germans.

An outstanding group of Colonial German farmhouses built before 1770 is found in the southern and western section of the district in Marion Township, the first section to be settled in 1723, and the area of the richest farmland. These include the Fidler, Reed, Kopp, and Braun log houses built c. 1730-1752, and the Loesch, Reed, and Dieffenbach stone houses c. 1753-1765. The log houses feature interior off-center chimneys, a two or three-room floor plan, and notched-corner construction. The stone houses display steep rooflines, evidence of encircling pent roofs, flat brick or stone arches over the window openings, and asymmetrical placement of windows and doors.

Its most salient feature is its Germanic character. This was noted in comments of early travellers:

John, Schoeff (1783-84) “…the Tulpehocken Creek is an exceedingly beautiful and fruitful section. Its inhabitants are prosperous and nearly all German, for these people have always and everywhere had an eye for the most fertile lands.”

Theopile Cazenoveo (1794) “The farmers houses are well built of stone, good large barns,…the land in grains and clover. They have all become rich through the high prices of grain since the French Revolution…They accumulate cash, buy land next to their own and give it to their sons . . . They have kept their ancestors’ costumes…their bearing and appearance…is German.”

Records from Upper Tulpehocken Twp – Blue Mountain Church:

 

Maria Margret GROH, dau of Simon and wife, baptized 4/28/1771, spons: Casper LANG and wife.

Simon GROH and ‘wife’ were sponsors at baptism of John Simon LANG, s/o Casper and wife, baptized on 3/8/1767.

Simon GROH and ‘wife’ also sponsored John Simon ALBERT, s/o Michael and wife, on 7/29/1770 at the same church.

Rebecca GROH, dau of Henry and wife, born 4/2/1790, baptized 5/13/1790, spons: Maria GROH

John GROH, dau of Henry and wife, born 4/3/1791, bp 4/26/1791, spons: John Marschall and Elizabeth

Simon GROH and ‘wife’ were sponsors at baptism of John Simon LANG, s/o Casper and wife, baptized on 3/8/1767.

Simon GROH and ‘wife’ also sponsored John Simon ALBERT, s/o Michael and wife, on 7/29/1770 at the same church.

 

Revolutionary War 1776

 

By looking over the names of the numerous men in Berks county who participated in the movement for independence, it will be found that they are almost entirely German. The population of the county was largely German and of German descent, and this preponderance of names over those of all other nationalities was to be expected. The proportion was fully nine-tenths. They used the German language in their daily affairs, excepting the transfer of title to real estate which was required to be in the English language by a provincial law. The location of the English people in 1775 was mostly at Reading, and in Robeson, Caernarvon, Union, Exeter, Oley, Maidencreek and Richmond townships, or eight districts out of twenty-nine, but the major part of the people in these districts also was German, excepting the southern section of the county. It can be stated that Berks county was then distinctively the most German county of the eleven counties in the Province.

 

Did (Simon) Jacob fight and/or die in the war?

Berks County Revolutionary War Soldiers, 1st, 2nd, 3rd Battalion 1777 and 1778

Capt. Kemp’s Company : Kroh, Jacob

 

PRICES DURING THE REVOLUTION.

Prices in October, 1776.

 

Linen, per yd 12sh. Wood, per cord £2

Shoes, per pr 15 ” Meat, per lb lOd.

Salt, per bu 25 ” The prices of articles generally

Pork, per quarter 13 ” were two and three times what

Butter, per lb 2- ” they were before 1775.

 

Prices in October, 1777, as fixed by the Commissary General :

 

Wheat, per bu 8sh., 6d. Pork, per 100 lb $7 and $8

Rye ” 8sh., 6d. Whiskey, per gall 8sh., 6d.

Indian Corn, per bu.. .6sh., 6d. Hay, per ton. 1st crop, £7, lOsh.

Beef, per 100 lb $10 ” ” 2nd ” £6

Other Prices.

Salt, per bu £10 and £15 Potatoes, per bu .. ..l6sh.

Cord Wood, per cord Cosh. Chickens, apiece lOsh.

 

When the Committee was appointed on November 8, 1777, to collect clothing, arms, etc., the articles taken were to be appraised as follows :

 

New single blanket £3.

In proportion for inferior kinds.

Strong, large, well-made shoes, per pr 25sh.

Good yarn stockings, per pr 22sh., 6d.

Good well-manufactured cloth, } yd. wide, per yd 30sh.

Good linsey woolsey, 1 yd. wide, per yd losh.

Good linen for soldiers’ shirts, 1 yd. wide, per yd 15sh.

Good tow linen, per yd. 8sh.

 

The Committeemen were allowed 20sh. per day for every day employed in performing their duty.

In 1780.

 

Col. Nicholas Lotz, as Commissioner of Purchases for Berks County, addressed a letter to the Executive Council, dated at Reading, June 5, 1780, in which the prices of certain articles at that time appear. They were as follows:

 

Corn, per bu 5sh., (id. Flour, per cwt 30sh.

Oats, ” 3sh., 9d. Hay, per ton 80sh.

Buckwheat, per bu 4sh.

 

Other events that occurred during his lifetime:

 

King George’s War 1744
Benjamin Franklin flies kite 1752
French and Indian War 1754
Sugar Act 1764

 

Variations in spelling can also be GROH/KROH as evidenced by this tax list in 1767:

On 1767 tax list, Tulpehocken Twp - Simon Kroh,  50 acres, 2 horses, 1 cow, tax=2.

In will abstracts from Berks Co:
Simon GROH, Tulpehocken, 6/22/1772
Administration to Catharine GROH, the widow.

 

To see the location where the Kroh family lived, visit this website:

 

http://ema.countyofberks.com/website/parcels/viewer.htm?Box=2425318.5:413651.5:2457280:448902.2

 

Owing to the large influx of foreigners, especially German and Swiss, it was deemed advisable to compel all to take the oath of allegance, which was at the first as follows :

 

I, (      ), do solemnly & sincerly promise & declare that I will be true& faithfull to King George the Second and do solemnly, sincerly and truly Profess Testifie and Declare, that I do from my Heart abhor, detest & renounce as impious & heretical that wicked Doctrine & Position that Princes Excommunicated or deprived by the Pope or any authority of the See of Rome may be deposed or murthered by their subjects or any other what late, State, or Potentate hath or ought to have any power, soever. And I do declare that no foreign Prince, Person, Pre-Jurisdiction, Superiority, Pre-eminence, or Authority Ecclesiastical or Spiritual within the Realm of Great Britain or the Dominions thereunto belonging.

 

I. (       ), do solemnly sincerly and truly acknowledge profess testify & declare that King George the Second is lawful & rightful King of the Realm of Great Britain & of all others his Dominions & Countries thereunto belonging, and I do solemnly & sincerly declare that I do believe the Person pretending to be Prince of Wales during the Life of the late King James, & since his Decease pretending to be taken upon himself Hie Stile and Title of King of England by the Name of James the Third, or of Scotland by the Name of James the Eighth or the Stile and title of King of Great Britain hath not any right or title whatsoever to the Crown of the Realm of Great Britain,nor any other the Dominions thereunto belonging. And I do renounce & refuse any Allegiance orobedience to him AT do solemnly promise, that I will be true and faithful, & bear true Allegiance to King George the Second & to him will be faithfull against all traitorous Conspiracies & attempts whatsoever which shall be made against his Person, Crown & Dignity, & Iwill doe my best Endeavours to disclose & make known to King Greorge the Second & his Successors all Treasons and traiterous Conspiracies which I shall know to be made against him or any of them. And 1 will be true and faithfull to the succession of the Crown against him the said James & all other Persons whatsoever as the same is & stands settled by An Act Entitled An Act declaring the Rights & Liberties of the Sub- ject, & settling the Succession of the Crown to the late Queen Anne & the Heirs of her Body being Protestants, and as the same by one other Act Entitled An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown & better securing the Rights & Liberties of the Subject is & stands Settled & Entailed after the Decease of the said late Queen, & for Default of Issue of the said late Queen to the late Princess Sophia Electoress & Duchess Dowager at Hanover the Heirs of Her Body being Protestants and all these things I do plainly & sincerly acknowledge promise & declare, according to these express words by me spoken& according to the plain & common sense and understanding of the same Words, without any Equivocation, mental Evasion or Secret Reservation whatsoever. And I do make this Recognition, Acknowledgement, Renunciation & Promise heartily willingly and truly.

 

All males over sixteen years of age were obliged to take this oath and declaration, as soon after their arrival as possible being marched to the Court House, although in a number of instances they were qualified at the official residence of the magistrate. According to “The Pennsylvania Archives Oath of Allegience”  Johan Simon Groh did, indeed, take this oath between 1727-1775.

 

A Diary of the Journey of Another Soul, Gottleb Mittelberger

“Passage To America, 1750,” EyeWitness to History, http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com

At the end of the seventeenth century approximately 200,000 people inhabited the British colonies in North America. The following century saw an explosion in numbers with the population doubling about every 25 years. The majority of these new immigrants were Scotch-Irish, Germans or African slaves. Between 1700 and the beginning of the American Revolution, approximately 250,000 Africans, 210,000 Europeans and 50,000 convicts had reached the colonial shores.

The passage to America was treacherous by any standard. Many of the immigrants were too poor to pay for the journey and therefore indentured themselves to wealthier colonialists – selling their services for a period of years in return for the price of the passage. Crammed into a small wooden ship, rolling and rocking at the mercy of the sea, the voyagers – men, women and children – endured hardships unimaginable to us today. Misery was the most common description of a journey that typically lasted seven weeks.

Gottleb Mittelberger was an organ master and schoolmaster who left one of the small German states in May 1750 to make his way to America. He arrived at the port of Philadelphia on October 10. He represents the thousands of Germans who settled in middle Pennsylvania during this period. He returned to his homeland in 1754. His diary was published in this country in 1898:

“…during the voyage there is on board these ships terrible misery, stench, fumes, horror, vomiting, many kinds of seasickness, fever, dysentery, headache, heat, constipation, boils, scurvy, cancer, mouth rot, and the like, all of which come from old and sharply-salted food and meat, also from very bad and foul water, so that many die miserably.

Add to this want of provisions, hunger, thirst, frost, heat, dampness, anxiety, want, afflictions and lamentations, together with other trouble, as e.g., the lice abound so frightfully, especially on sick people, that they can be scraped off the body. The misery reaches a climax when a gale rages for two or three nights and days, so that every one believes that the ship will go to the bottom with all human beings on board. In such a visitation the people cry and pray most piteously.

No one can have an idea of the sufferings which women in confinement have to bear with their innocent children on board these ships. Few of this class escape with their lives; many a mother is cast into the water with her child as soon as she is dead. One day, just as we had a heavy gale, a woman in our ship, who was to give birth and could not give birth under the circumstances, was pushed through a loophole (porthole) in the ship and dropped into the sea, because she was far in the rear of the ship and could not be brought forward.

Children from one to seven years rarely survive the voyage; and many a time parents are compelled to see their children miserably suffer and die from hunger, thirst, and sickness, and then to see them cast into the water. I witnessed such misery in no less than thirty-two children in our ship, all of whom were thrown into the sea. The parents grieve all the more since their children find no resting place in the earth, but are devoured by the monsters of the sea. It is a notable fact that children who have not yet had the measles or smallpox generally get them on board the ship, and mostly die of them.

When the ships have landed at Philadelphia after their long voyage, no one is permitted to leave them except those who pay for their passage or can give good security; the others, who cannot pay, must remain on board the ships till they are purchased and are released from the ships by their purchasers. The sick always fare the worst, for the healthy are naturally preferred and purchased first; and so the sick and wretched must often remain on board in front of the city for two or three weeks, and frequently die, whereas many a one, if he could pay his debt and were permitted to leave the ship immediately, might recover and remain alive.

The Port of Philadelphia, 1756

The sale of human beings in the market on board the ship is carried on thus: Every day Englishmen, Dutchmen, and High German people come from the city of Philadelphia and other places, in part from a great distance, say twenty, thirty, or forty hours away, and go on board the newly-arrived ship that has brought and offers for sale passengers from Europe, and select among the healthy persons such as they deem suitable for their business, and bargain with them how long they will serve for their passage money, which most of them are still in debt for, When they have come to an agreement, it happens that adult persons bind themselves in writing to serve three, four, five, or six years for the amount due by them, according to their age and strength. But very young people, from ten to fifteen years, must serve till they are twenty-one years old.

Many parents must sell and trade away their children like so many head of cattle, for if their children take the debt upon them- selves, the parents can leave the ship free and unrestrained; but as the parents often do not know where and to what people their children are going, it often happens that such parents and children, after leaving the ship, do not see each other again for many years, perhaps no more in all their lives.

It often happens that whole families, husband, wife, and children, are separated by being sold to different purchasers, especially when they have not paid any part of their passage money.

When a husband or wife has died at sea, when the ship has made more than half of her trip, the survivor must pay or serve not only for himself or herself, but also for the deceased. When both parents have died over halfway at sea, their children, especially when they are young and have nothing to pawn or to pay, must stand for their own and their parents’ passage, and serve till they are twenty-one years old. When one has served his or her term, he or she is entitled to a new suit of clothes at parting; and if it has been so stipulated, a man gets in addition a horse, a woman, a cow.”

References:
Mittelberger, Gottleb, Gottleb Mittelberger’s Journey to Pennsylvania in the Year 1750 and Return to Germany in the year 1754 (published by the German Society of Pennsylvania 1898)

Children of Simon Kroh (Groh) and Anna Catherine Kantner are:

 

Henry Kroh, b. 12 Nov 1764, Berks Co., Pennsylvania, d. 04 Sep 1823, Martinsburg, VA.

Maria Margaret Groh b. before 28 Apr 1771, baptized 4/28/1771

 

Pennsylvania. Secretary of the Commonwealth, Pennsylvania. Dept. of Public Instruction, Pennsylvania State Library1896

http://books.google.com/books?id=BUEOAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA751&lpg=PA751&dq=kroh+berks&source=bl&ots=oT-x8HLFzU&sig=4YPWNoKX6L-GtumHFFwT-nfvPvA&hl=en&ei=oxuFTL_kKIv9nAfC4pDQAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=19&ved=0CGUQ6AEwEg#v=onepage&q&f=false

http://www.livingplaces.com/PA/Berks_County/Marion_Township/Tulpehocken_Creek_Historic_District.html

Not “our” Krohs: http://files.usgwarchives.org/il/wabash/cemeteries/mtcarmel/roseold.txt

Anne Ladd

1592-1668

Immigrant Ancestress

Anne Ladd

Anne Wilmot

Lydia Bunnell

Elizabeth French

Mary Holt

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Anne (Ann) Ladd was born in 1592 in England She married Benjamin Wilmot in England. She died 7 Oct 1668 at New Haven at the age of 76. She is buried in the Center Church on the Green Churchyard, New Haven, Connecticut. There is no headstone.

 

New Haven records: March 10, 1646 “Goody Wilmott asigned to sit in the 5th seat in the cross seats at the end of the middle seats in the meeting house.” Vital Records of New Haven state: “Anne wife of old Benjamin Wilmot (died) octobr 7th 68.”

 

Educating the Colonies

Prior to 1650, it does not appear that in either of the original colonies of Connecticut or of New Haven, there was any legal enactment on the subject of Schools, or the education of children. The whole subject was left to the discretion of the magistrates and the clergy. In 1650, the original colony of Connecticut adopted a Code of Laws, in which the practice of the colonists is at length clothed with legal sanction ; and here it is provided that

Forasmuch as the good education of children is of singular behoof and benefit to any commonwealth ; and whereas many parents and masters are too indulgent and negligent of their duty in that kind, it is therefore ordered that the select-men in the several precincts and quarters where they dwell, shall have a vigilant eye over their bretheren and neighbors, to see that none of them suffer so much barbarism in any of their families, as not to endeavor to teach by themselves or others, their children and apprentices, so much learning as may enable them perfectly to read the English tongue, and knowledge of its laws, upon penalty of twenty shillings.” And it is further ordered, that children and apprentices must be brought up to some honest, lawrull calling, labor or employment, either in husbandry, or some other trade profitable for themselves and the commonwealth.”

These provisions were enforced by severe penalties, and in case of continued neglect, the authority were empowered to assume the place of the parent and master, and exercise those natural rights, which they had used to so bad a purpose.

The same Code, having thus recognized and enforced the duties of parents and masters as to the education of their children and apprentices, provides in another place for the establishment and maintenance of schools in the several townships wiithin its jurisdiction. After a preamble nearly similar to that of the Massachusetts law of 1647, that

to the end that learning may not be buried in the graves of our forefathers in church and commonwealth,” it is ordered, that every township of fifty householders ” shall appoint “one within their town to teach all such children as shall resort to him, to write and read, whose wages shall be paid either by the parents or masters of such children, or by the inhabitants in general, by way of supply, as the major part of those who order the prudentials of the town shall appoint. And every township of one hundred families, shall set up a grammar school; the masters thereof being able to instruct youths so far as they may be fitted for the university.” Every town which neglected this last provision, must pay five pounds every year to the next such school, till they shall perform this order.”

In 1656, the New Haven colony compiled a Code of Laws, in which the education of children is provided for in nearly the same way. The public authorities in each plantation within its jurisdiction, are ordered to have a vigilant eye “ that all parents and masters, either by their own ability and labor, or by improving such school master or other help and means as the plantation doth afford, or the family may conveniently provide, that all children and apprentices as they grow capable, may, through God’s blessing, obtain, at least, so much as to be enabled to read the Scriptures, and other good and profitable books in the English language.” This provision was enforced by fines, increasing in amount for repeated violation, till in case of continued neglect, the children and apprentices were taken from their natural guardians and protectors, and placed where they might be better educated and governed, both for the public convenience, and for their own particular good.

Children of Benjamin Wilmot and Ann Ladd are:

  1. Benjamin Wilmot b.1615 d. 8 Apr 1651
  2. William Wilmotb.1621 d. 1654
  3. Ann Wilmot b. 1621/22, d. b May 1654

Title: Wilmot of New Haven. Author: The Wilmot Family of New Haven, Conn. by Donald Lines Jacobus. Publication: New England Historical Genealogical Society, 1904. Boston. Call Number: CS71.W74 1904. Media Type: Book. Note: Reprinted from the New-England Historical and Genealogical Register for Jan., 1905. University of Michigan.

Title: Vital Records of New Haven, 1649-1850. Author: Connecticut Society of the Order of the Founders and Patriots of America. Publication: Hartford, CT, 1917. Media Type: Book. Note: http://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/new_haven_vr/default.asp. Vol. 1, p. 25 1 United Ancestries Linked Pedigrees CD 100 (Automated Archives).

Vital Records of New Haven, 1649-1850, Parts I & II (also currently published at http://www.ancestry.com).

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut.

James Savage, Genealogical Dictionary of New England (Genealogical Pub. Co., c1981).

New England Historical and Genealogical Register (Vol. 59).

Adele Andrews, The Ancestors and Descendants of Havilah and Dorcas Gale Bunnell.

Benjamin Wilmot The Boston Transcript Boston, MA Feb. 11, 1929, #8043.

Hilda Grace Morse McPherson letter dated June 11, 1983 at 1717 S. 14th St., Coshocton, Ohi 43812.

Duane A. Josephson to Linda Coate Dudick Letter dated June 14, 1996 820 Taylor St., Apt. 7, Medford, OR 97504-7367 In Linda Coate files (F-447).

Elizabeth Lamberton

1632-1716

Immigrant Ancestress

No Stranger to Tragedy

Elizabeth Lamberton

Elizabeth Trowbridge

Peter Mallory

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Elizabeth Lamberton (George1  ) was born 5 November 1632 at London, Middlesex, England. She was baptized 20 March 1634 at Stepney St. Dunstan, London, Middlesex, England. She was the daughter of George Lamberton and Margaret Lewen. Elizabeth Lamberton married William Trowbridge 9 Mar 1656/1657 in Milford, Milford, Connecticut, OR 09 March 1656/57 in Exeter, Devon, England. After his death, Elizabeth may have married Daniel Sellivant.  Elizabeth Lamberton died May 1716 in West Haven, New Haven, Connecticut and is buried inWest Haven, New Haven, Ct.

Both her father and her eldest son died at sea.

Children of Elizabeth Lamberton and William Trowbridge  are:

 

  1. Capt. William Trowbridge ; born 12 Nov 1657 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. He died before 2 Feb 1703/1704 at Sea. William Trowbridge passed his boyhood in his native town, New Haven, Conn. On January 2, 1681/82, he received a grant of 50 acres of land in the town of Suffield, Conn., and on March 9 following he was invited to teach the first school established there, at a salary of 10 pounds per annum for five years and a payment for every additional scholar. He married and made his home in his native town. He was a planter and shipmaster, sailing out of New Haven. He was captain of the sloop, Adventure, when it was taken by the French on July 20, 1697. Captain Trowbridge was accustomed to make voyages to the West Indies, Fayal and other foreign ports, and died on one of these voyages. He attended the First Church, of which his wife was admitted a member May 15, 1689
  2. Deacon Thomas Trowbridge  was born 2 Oct 1659 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. He died about Jul 1750 in West Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Thomas Trowbridge settled in the parish of West Haven in his native town. His home was on the north side of what is now Main street, a little east of Campbell avenue, near the Green, but he also owned considerable farmland towards the Sound. He was engaged in farming and is described as “husbandman” in the public records of that time. He was elected a selectman of New Haven in 1715 and 1716. He was among the first members of the West Haven Congregational church, organized in 1719, and became one of its first two deacons, an office which he held until his death. In 1733 his name heads the church fund with a donation of 130 pounds, the largest amount subscribed by any one person.
  3. Elizabeth Trowbridge, born 05 January 1661/62 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut; died May 1732 in Stratford, Bridgeport, Connecticut; married Peter Mallory 28 May 1678 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.
  4. Deacon James Trowbridge was born 26 Mar 1664 and died about May 1732.
  5. Margaret Trowbridge was born 1 Jun 1666 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.
  6. Hannah Trowbridge was born 6 Jul 1668 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.
  7. Abigail Trowbridge was born 7 Oct 1670 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. She died 20 Feb 1696/1697.
  8. Samuel Trowbridge was born 7 Oct 1670 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. He died about Mar 1741/1742 in Fairfield, Fairfield Co., CT.Samuel Trowbridge went with his elder brother to Stratford, Conn., and in May, 1695, was “a soldier pressed in the Province galley.” After his marriage he settled in the parish of Stratfield, near Fairfield, Conn., where he was engaged in farming. He was admitted a member of the Stratfield Congregational church on July 23, 1710, and his wife on February 14, 1713/4
  9. Mary Trowbridge was born 12 Oct 1672 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT and was christened in 1st Congregational, New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.
  10. Joseph Trowbridge was born 1676 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. He died May 1715 in Stratfield, Fairfield Co., CT. Joseph Trowbridge settled in the parish of Stratfield, near Fairfield, Conn., where he followed the trade of a carpenter and was also engaged in farming. He and his wife were members of the Stratfield Congregational church.

 

Mary DeWitt, Trowbridge File, Compiler Address: Ridgewood Public Library, Ridgewood, NJ 07450.

 

Captain George Lamberton

Abt. 1610-1646

Immigrant Ancestor

Founding Family of New Haven

Died at Sea

George Lamberton

Elizabeth Lamberton

Elizabeth Trowbridge

Peter Mallory

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

George Lamberton’s birth date is unknown, but estimated at about 1610. George was born in England. He married Margaret Lewen on 6 January 1628/29 in St. Mary’s Whitecchapel, London, London, England. Capt George Lamberton died in 1646 in sea. He was the captain of the “Great Shippe,” built by the settlers at New Haven, intended for trading with England.  Capt George Lamberton immigrated in 1641 to New Haven, New Haven Colony, now Connecticut.

 

Capt. George Lamberton was one of the merchant gentlemen who founded the Colony of New Haven. He came from London. He is called of the parish of St. Mary’s Whitechapel when, on 6 Jan. 1628/9, he married Margaret Lewen (Register, Vol. 61, P. 189). Some account of him and of his family is given in The Converse Family, 1905, vol. 2, pp. 681. et seq. He was lost in 1646 on board the “great ship” he commanded, whose fate is the theme of Longfellow’s poem, “The Phantom Ship.” In the following year his widow, Margaret, married Deputy-Governor Stephen Goodyear.

 

"In 1638 Capt. Lamberton brought to Boston a shipload of Puritans from Yorkshire under the leadership of Rev. Ezekial Rogers and they started the town of Rowley in Massachusetts Bay Colony this same year. Lamberton may not have owned this ship but was under contract to handle it. In this same year, a preliminary settlement was made at New Haven in territory that was claimed by the Dutch. That winter, 1638 - 1639, most of the settlers retired to Boston and recruited additional members. Capt. Lamberton, who had a house in Boston, presumably for his family, defected from the Rowley Puritans and threw in his lot with the New Haven settlers. In 1639 he made a profitable voyage to Delaware Bay where he traded furs with the Indians. His family like the others occupied a cellar for a year or so. The Delaware Company was formed and sent Capt. Lamberton and Nathaniel Mason on a second trip to Delaware Bay. On this voyage the permanent settlement of Cape May was accomplished in 1640.

 

"May 6, 1640. Mr. Lamberton delivered into Court an account betwixt himself and Goodm Spencer, whom he employed as his steward att sea on his voyage hither; for which service he allows him 5 lbs. and 10 s. for the whole voyage; but whereas he dyed before he had served half the voyage, he desired that Roger Allen who succeeded him should have one-half of the hyer."

 

of subsequent trips were made by Lamberton to Delaware Bay in his sloop The Cock. He attempted another permanent settlement near Salem, New Jersey, in 1643 after purchasing the region south of Trenton from the Indians. The Swedes resented this intrusion into their territory by dysentery caused the effort to be abandoned. Later Lamberton started a fur trading post at the mouth of the Schuylkill, now the site of Philadelphia, but the Dutch seized his men, burned down his buildings and took his property. The Swedish Governor Printz also tried him for trespassing, conspiring with the Indians and other trumped-up charges. Lamberton, of course, was convicted in a Swedish court and severely fined. The inhabitants of New Haven "being Londoners chiefly, unskilled in husbandry", needed to export or die. Accordingly they built a "great ship" in 1645 and ladened it with saleable goods.

The Phantom Ship

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In Mather’s Magnalia Christi,
Of the old colonial time,
May be found in prose the legend
That is here set down in rhyme.

A ship sailed from New Haven,
And the keen and frosty airs,
That filled her sails at parting,
Were heavy with good men’s prayers.

O Lord! if it be thy pleasure–
Thus prayed the old divine–
To bury our friends in the ocean,
Take them, for they are thine!

But Master Lamberton muttered,
And under his breath said he,
This ship is so crank and walty,
I fear our grave she will be!

And the ship that came from England,
When the winter months were gone,
Brought no tidings of this vessel,
Nor of Master Lamberton.

This put the people to praying
That the Lord would let them hear
What in His greater wisdom
He had done with friends so dear.

And at last their prayers were answered:–
It was in the month of June,
An hour before the sunset
Of a windy afternoon,

When, steadily steering landward,
A ship was seen below,
And they knew it was Lamberton, Master,
Who sailed so long ago.

On she came, with a cloud of canvas,
Right against the wind that blew.
Until the eye could distinguish
The faces of the crew.

Then fell her straining topmasts,
Hanging tangled in the shrouds,
And her sails were loosened and lifted,
And blown away like clouds.

And the masts, with all their rigging,
Fell slowly, one by one,
And the hulk dilated and vanished,
As a sea-mist in the sun!

And the people who saw this marvel
Each said unto his friend,
That this was the mould of their vessel,
And thus her tragic end.

And the pastor of the village
Gave thanks to God in prayer,
That, to quiet their troubled spirits,
He had sent this Ship of Air.

Two Quinnipiac Indians along with John Davenport (dressed in a black robe) and other New Haveners, watch the “Phantom Ship” depart on its fateful journey in 1646.”Embarkation of the phantom ship” Jesse Talbot From the collection of the New Haven Colony Historical Society. A sculpture of the ship is in Kimberly Square, and a carving of it is over a mantle at Yale University.

1644: THE PHANTOM SHIP AKA THE GREAT SHIPPE

As early as 1644 Theophilus Eaton, Stephen Goodyear, Thomas Gregston and perhaps other merchants at New Haven entrusted the construction of an ocean-going vessel to John Wakeman, Joshua Atwater, Jasper Crane and Richard Miles. Though ill built and very “walt-side,” in due course the ship was completed. Entrusted with a cargo of wheat, peas, hides, beaver and peltry- roughly one-fifth of the colony’s total wealth, plus manuscript writings of John Davenport at New Haven and Thomas Hooker at Hartford, about the middle of January, 1646, the vessel ploughed its way through three miles of ice in New Haven harbor and tackled the stormy Atlantic. On board were Thomas Gregson, Nathaniel Turner, George Lamberton, the wife of Stephen Goodyear, and Francis Austin.

But in their haste, they may have cut corners. There were reports of shoddy construction, as well as cargo being secured poorly. What’s more, the ship had to break through thick ice to leave the city’s port in January 1646.

The Great Shippe never made it to England. It capsized during a storm at sea, with 70 New Haven residents on board.

Here’s the Ghost Ship part. The following June, local folks allegedly saw an apparition of a large vessel heading into harbor. They insisted it must be their Great Shippe, home at last.

Children of Capt George Lamberton and Margaret Lewen are:

  1. Elizabeth Lamberton b. c 1632, d. 1716
  2. Hannah Lamberton b. c 1634, d. date unknown
  3. Hope Lamberton b. c 1636, d. bt 1698 – 1704
  4. Deliverance Lamberton b. c 1638, d. 1659
  5. Mercy Lamberton b. 17 Jan 1640/41, d. b 1677
  6. Desire Lamberton b. b 14 Mar 1642/43, d. date unknown
  7. Obedience Lamberton b. b 9 Feb 1644/45, d. 29 Mar 1734

Erroneous statements have been made concerning his family, one being that Mary, first wife of Lieut.-Gov. James was his daughter. This error is based on a passage from the trial of Mrs Godman for witchcraft in 1653, which states that Mrs. Godman “hath much inquired upon the time of Mrs Bishops delivery of her children, and would speake of it so Mrs Goodyeare and her daughters marveled how she could know, and Hannah Lamberton one time told her mother that Mr Godman kept her sisters count.” It is evident that the Mrs. Bishop of the record was sister either of Hannah Lamberton or of her mother, Margaret (Lewen) (Lamberton) Goodyear, but she may have been Patience, wife of Henry Bishop (brother of James), instead of Mary, wife of James. At all events, it is certain that Mary Bishop was not a daughter of George Lamberton, as she left surviving issue who did not share in the Lamberton estate.

 

Genealogies of Connecticut families: from the New England historical and genealogical register Judith McGhan, Genealogical Publishing Co

 

Susanna Barbara Lauer

1705-Bef 1748

Immigrant Ancestress

Mother of Nine

Susanna Barbara Lauer

Johann Michael Tice

John Tice

Sara Tice

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Susanna Barbara Lauer was born 23 March 1705 in Hirstein, Sankt Wendel, Saarland, Germany. Her parents were Hans Johann Peter Lauer and Maria Barbel “Barbara” Kohl . She was baptised 23 Mar 1705, Wolfersweiler, Germany. She married Hans Matthias Theiss AKA Joh or Johannes Matthias Theiss AKA Matthias Dice AKA Johannas Dice on 5 Mar 1726, at the Reformed Church; Grunbach, Rheinland, Germany. She died before 1748, Lebanon Township, Lancaster County, PA and was reported buried at Tulpehocken Trinity Reformed Church, Lancaster County (now Lebanon County) PA. She is not listed in the burials, but it is quite possible her marker was gone before the stones were recorded in the early 1900’s.

 

Susanna and her husband, with their oldest son, Johann Michael Tice, arrived in Philadelphia on the ship "Thistle" on August 29, 1730 (see: “Mathias Thais”).

Harrowing were the experiences of people who risked their lives and property to cross the Atlantic Ocean from Europe to America during the Sixteenth to Eighteenth Centuries. The season for passage began in early May and ended in late October with each westerly voyage from England requiring at least seven to eight weeks with good tail winds, and often ten to twelve weeks if the winds were not favorable. A typical journey for refugees fleeing religious persecution in Europe or indentured servants contracting years of labor for the cost of passage would often begin in Rotterdam or Amsterdam and then proceed to England for supplies.

18th Century Sailing Ship

Accommodations were sparse. Personal living space was limited to just barely enough room for a person to lay down to sleeping. Most ships would dock in England for several days while cargo and provisions were loaded. Passengers would spend money or eat some of what little food they had brought for the journey, only to later discover on the open sea that those few morsels would have eased the hunger that will haunt them for most of the voyage. Far too many people did not realize, nor were they prepared for the actual degree of human misery that lay before them. Sailing vessels of this period were grossly unsanitary because of the accumulation of repeated vomitings, dysentery, sweat, mildew, and rot. The lower decks were usually filled with stench. People suffered from ill preserved food stores, constipation, headaches, infestations of lice, a multitude of maladies resulting from impure water, and of course the ubiquitous affliction of seasickness. Add to this the emotional fatigue of unrelenting weather conditions such as cold, dampness, heat, and storms that would rage for days. Passengers were repeatedly thrown against each other in step with the rhythmic pounding of each wave. Homesickness began to plague many because they remembered all too well the comfort of even the most humble dwelling. So bad did the conditions become after many weeks, that people longed to be home, if even to sleep in a barnyard. Psychological factors then begin to play through manifestations of impatience and unceasing frustration. Curses and threats of harm were frequently exchanged, and occasionally tensions escalated into brawls, even between members of the same family. They cursed and berated each other. Stole from one another. Constant anxiety for life and safety began to turn into hopelessness,

Death was a steadfast companion of both passengers and crew for many would perish. Burial at sea can be an especially difficult and trying experience. One does not have the expected proper time for remorse because the body must be cast overboard in a short period of time. The sea does not allow family members to return to an exact spot in order to grieve as is true of a land based cemetery where people can repeatedly return, where flowers can serve as a visible closure, and the certainty that graves usually remain unmolested. Death at sea can be a cruel experience. You cannot return. There is the haunting reality that the body will probably be eaten. Family members reproach each other for persuading them to make the journey. Wives reproached their husbands for children that were lost. Husbands lamented most piteously for convincing their family to make the journey. Children bemoaned parents for their helplessness. Witness accounts record unbelievable despair and misery. As more and more people die, it becomes almost impossible to console the relatives.

"Many hundred people necessarily die and perish in such misery, and must be cast into the sea, which drives their relatives or those that persuaded them to undertake the journey, to such despair that it is almost impossible to pacify or console them. In a word the sighing and crying and lamenting on board the ship continues day and night, so as to cause the hearts of even the most hardened to bleed when they hear it."

On the Misfortune of Indentured Servants, Gottlieb Mittelberger, 1754.

Hans Matthias Theiss and Susanna Barbara Lauer had the following children:

 

  1. Johann Michael Tice was born in Hirstein, Germany on February 1, 1728. He died in 1802 in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. He married Margaretha Elisabetha Reith. She was born on April 13, 1730 in the Tuplehocken Region of Pennsylvania, and died September 22, 1804 in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Together, they had 10 children.
  2. Henry Tice was born in 1738 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He died on January 4, 1806 in Washington County, Maryland. He married twice. He first married Elizabeth Jones. She was born in 1740 in Wales, United Kingdom. They had 8 children. Then in 1785, he married Susannah Jones. She was born in 1765 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and died on November 29, 1824 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Together, they had 7 children.
  3. Matthias Dice was born circa 1730 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He died in June of 1799 in Pendleton County, Virginia (now West Virginia). He married Catharina Herrber, and had 11 children. She is buried with him.
  4. George Dice. He was born circa 1734 and died in 1772 Pendleton County, Virginia (now West Virginia). He married Anna Margaret Burgstaller on September 7, 1755, and had 3 children with her. She is buried with him.
  5. Johannes (5) “John” Theiss.
  6. David Deiss was born in 1735. He married Barbara Mosser and stayed in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania.
  7. Daniel Tice. He was born in 1738 and died in Washington County, Maryland. He married Catherine, who was born around 1752. Together, they had 4 children.
  8. Elizabeth Tice. She was born on October 30, 1739 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. She died in March of 1831 in Berks County, Pennsylvania. She married Nicholas Kilmer on December 13, 1763 in Berks County, Pennsylvania. He was born November 23, 1736 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and died July 26, 1811 in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Together, they had 9 children.
  9. Joseph Tice was born on November 23, 1747.

                Ship Passenger Lists, Pennsylvania and Delaware (1641-1825) Carl Boyer

Sarah Lees

1604-1661

Immigrant Ancestress

Sarah Lees

Jacob Mott

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher                                                              Unknown Woman 1645 Portrait->

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Sarah Lees was born in 1604 in the Netherlands. Sarah married (1) Bartel Englebetzen (Englebret) Lott (b: 1600 in Reynerwout,Drenthe,Netherlands.) She married (2) Adam Mott 11 May 1635 in Horseheath,  Cambridge, England. Sarah died in 1661 in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.

 

 

 

Children of Sarah Lees and Bartel Lott are:

  1. Mary Englebert LOTT b: 3 MAY 1631 in Cambridge,Cambridge,England

 

 

 

Children of Sarah Lees and Adam Mott are:

 

  1. Jacob Mott born 1633 in England, married Joanna Slocum about 1660 in Newport, RI. died 15 Nov 1711 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  2. Eleazer Mott
  3. Elazer Mott
  4. Gershom Mott

Margaret Lewen

1614-1655

Immigrant Ancestress

Margaret Lewen

Elizabeth Lamberton

Elizabeth Trowbridge

Peter Mallory

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Margaret Lewen was born in 1614 in England. She married as her first husband Capt George Lamberton on 6 January 1628/29 in St. Mary’s Whitecchapel, London, London, England. He died and sea, and the following year Margaret Lewen married as her second husband Stephen Goodyear , son of Zachary Goodyear and Susanna Baxter, in 1648 in New Haven, New Haven Colony, now Connecticut. Margaret Lewen died on 21 July 1655 in New Haven, New Haven Colony, now Connecticut.

 

On 20 Oct. 1658 “Ma Goodyeare & her children by Mr. Lamberton prsenting themselves before the court, she desired that ye portions wch remaine unpaid dew to the children, might be set out by ye Court, vpon which p position it was demanded of Wilm Trowbridge, ye husband to Elizabeth Lamberton, what he had received of Mr Goodyeare. Hannah & Hope Lamberton, being at age, were appointed to receive their portions, which they desired might be delivered to their mother. Deliverance, who is to have a double portion, & Mercy, Desire, and Obedience, chose their mother for their guardian.”

 

The homes of colonial farmers ranged from modest to stately. Most farmers lived in substantial wooden homes, one and one-half stories. The ground floor was frequently a single room with a large fireplace at one end. Occasionally, the homeowner walled off the other end to create a bedroom. Most household activities took place in the main room, or hall. Upstairs, a loft, or chamber, provided sleeping space for family members at night. The farmer raised crops and livestock, often just enough to support the family and the stock. He tried to accumulate enough land so that when his sons reached adulthood, he could give them some land to start a farm of their own.

 

Children of Margaret Lewen and Capt George Lamberton are:

  1. Elizabeth Lamberton, b. c 1632, d. 1716
  2. Hannah Lamberton4 b. c 1634, d. date unknown
  3. Hope Lamberton4 b. c 1636, d. bt 1698 – 1704
  4. Deliverance Lamberton4 b. c 1638, d. 1659
  5. Mercy Lamberton4 b. 17 Jan 1640/41, d. b 1677
  6. Desire Lamberton4 b. b 14 Mar 1642/43, d. date unknown
  7. Obedience Lamberton4 b. b 9 Feb 1644/45, d. 29 Mar 1734

Children of Margaret Lewen and Stephen Goodyear are:

  1. Elizabeth Goodyear3 b. 1648, d. date unknown
  2. Andrew Goodyear5 b. b 8 Apr 1649, d. date unknown
  3. John Goodyear+5 b. 8 Mar 1650/51, d. 14 Jan 1702
  4. Esther Goodyear5 b. 12 May 1654, d. 9 Feb 1690/91

“Extracts from English Parish Registers.”

Scott, Button, Kinney, Williams, Squier Home Page, online http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/f/r/i/…

Ancestors of Melinda Weaver, online http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/w/e/a/…

“Lamberton Family.”

“Baptisms in New Haven.”

 Anna Maria Catherina Lutz

Abt. 1690-Aft. 1732

Immigrant Ancestress

Anna Maria Catherina Lutz

Jacob Kanter

Anna Catherine Kanter

Henry Kroh

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Born about 1690 in Germany, Anna (1) married Hans Jacob Kanter (or Kantner) 7 Nov 1710 in Waldmohr, Kusel, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. Anna died after 1732 in Berks County, Pennsylvania.

 

There is an “Anna Maria Kantner” (Birth and death dates unknown) buried in the Mount Peace Cemetery, Minersville, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, USA

 

Children of Hans Jacob Kanter and  Anna Maria Catherina Lutz are:

 

  1. Anna Magdalena Kantner,   b. 17 Jan 1712
  2. Anna Elisabetha Kantner,   b. 9 Jul 1714
  3. Jacob Kantner,   b. before 28 Apr 1716, Hahnweiler, Birkenfeld, Rheinland-Pfalz, Deutschland,   d. before 29 Mar 1773, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania
  4. George Kantner,   b. 9 Nov 1719, Hahnweiler, Birkenfeld, Rheinland-Pfalz, Deutschland,   d. 1 Feb 1782, Tulpehocken Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania
  5. Nicholas Kanter,   b. 21 Feb 1724
  6. Mary Martha Ketner,   b. 31 Jul 1725,   d. about 1808
  7. Margareta Lousia Kantner,   b. 10 Apr 1729

 

Strausstown Roots

 

The Mallory Family

“Supposedly, all of the American Mallory’s come from the same original line back to Richard Mallore who lived between the reigns of King Stephen and King Henry II around 1135-1189. His descendants include many lords and ladies. It is likely that the family first gained lands and recognition when fighting with William the Conqueror.  The name is variously spelled in the early records as Mallery, Malery, Mallary, Malary, Mallorye, Mallory and Malory, but in later years it most frequently appears as “Mallory”.

 There is another huge group of Peter Mallorys that settled in Vermont.

 

                                  Charity Mallory

Abt. 1734- 1826

Widowed with Ten Children

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Charity Mallory (Peter3,Peter2,Peter1  ) was born Abt. 1734 in Waterbury, New Haven Co. CT, daughter of Peter Mallory and Mary Beardsley. She married Jesse Hotchkiss , son of  Gideon Hotchkiss and Anna Brockett 02 October 1759 in Waterbury, CT  She was left a widow with ten children when he died on the battlefield in the Revolutionary War. She died died 1826 in Salem Parish, CT.

 

The pension for Revolutionary War widows was $96 per year.

 

Children of Charity Mallory and Jesse Hotchkiss are:

 

1.        Asael b Feb 15 1760
  1. Charity Hotchkiss (“Charrity”) b Mch 24 1761
3.        Beulah b Mch 13 1762 d Oct 24 1776 
4.        Gabril b Aug 13 1763 d Jan 22 1765 
5.        Rebecka b Jan 7 1765 
6.        Temperance b Dec 3 1767 
7.        Apalina Hotchkiss b Jan 3 1768 
8.        Cloe b Jan 5 1771 
9.        Anna b May 19 1772 
10.  Huldah b. Mch 9 1774 II 

The town and city of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 1 By Sarah Johnson Prichard 1896

 

Before going out shopping or visiting, the lady would put on a cloak and hat. Here the lady is wearing a short cloak of black silk taffeta but in the 18th century a garment of any length or fabric worn around the shoulders could be called a cloak.

The ‘kissing strings’ or ‘bridles’ of the cap have been pinned together under the chin. Through out the century hats for women usually have a very shallow crown and start to be cocked up behind like this by the early 1750’s.

 Peter Mallory

Bef. 1625-1698/99

Immigrant Ancestor

Chimney Sweep, Planter, and Speculator

Peter Mallory

Peter Mallory

Peter Mallory

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Peter Mallory (1) was born in Shelton, England before 1625. His parentage is in dispute. He possibly married Elizabeth Barnes in Feb 1647/48 in New Haven, CT. He married Mary Preston 12 March 1647/48 in Fairfield, Fairfield Co., CT. Peter died 30 August 1698 in New Haven, Conn..

 

Peter immigrated Jun 26, 1637, entering Boston, Suffolk, MA. He arrived aboard the “Hector” (from England or Bermuda) according to May R. Mallory’s book on the Mallorys. He is not on the passenger lists for the Hector in that year, so the source of her information would be important.

 

Peter Mallory signed the planter’s covenant at New Haven, Conn., 1644.

 

He and his apparently recent wife appeared before the court Feb. 6, 1648/9 where the minutes state “Peeter Mallory and his wife was called before the court and was charged with the sinn of vncleaness or fornication, a sinn wch they was told shutts out the kingdome of heaven, without repentaine and a sinn wch layes them open to shame and punishment in the court. It is that wch the Holy Ghost brands with the name of folly, it is that wherein men show their brutishness, therefore as a whip is for the horse and asse, so a rod is for ye follish backs. They confessed their sinn, and desired the court to show them mercy in respect of their bodies, she being weakely, and for ought is known, with child, and he subject to distraction, haueing sometime bine distempered that way. Wch things the court considereding, thought it most meete to punish by fine and not by corporall punishment,and therefore ordered that they pay 5 pounds as fine to the town, and that they be brought forth to the place of correction that they may be ashamed and that it appeare the corporall punishment is remitted in respect of mercy to their bodies, but with the shame of the sinn as if the correction was laide on.” This court record is likely to be for the offense of premarital sex. This type of case was not uncommon in early court records. The wife referred to could be his possible first wife, Elizabeth Barnes, or his wife in most sources who is Mary (Preston).

If his wife was Elizabeth in this record, she probably died shortly after. In either case, his wife’s name is referred to as Mary after this original record by whom he had all his children starting within the next couple years. He bought a house, orchard and land from Nathaniell Seeley in (1651). His seating arrangement in one particular church meeting, suggests that he was in good standing but not of a particularly high social class. His wife was listed as Goodwife Mallory, meaning that she, too, was considered to be a respected middle class citizen. According to “The Mallory’s of Mystic” by James P. Baughman, he was chimney sweep, planter, and speculator in tobacco and land.

 

Though there is no absolute record that Peter married Mary Preston, circumstantial evidence leads to that conclusion.

 

Peter and John Hunter signed the oath of allegiance together in 1644. This same John Hunter in his will dated May 15, 1648 divided his small estate between Sarah Meeker (d. of William Preston), Mary (wd. of William Preston) and Peter Mallory. It is suggested in the “History of Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield” that John Hunter, and Peter Mallory possibly lived with Prestons at that point in time. Some descendants of Peter Mallory had also followed the Prestons from Stratford, CT to Woodbury, CT.

 

Peter’s home and most of his land was located near the Milford Town line at what was called West Side Farms, now known as West Haven. He and sons, Peter, Thomas, Daniel and John were all listed as proprietors (land owners) in a 1685 document listing same for New Haven, Connecticut.

 

On Jan. 2, 1687, Peter Mallery of New Haven, planter, gives land to his son Peter, “whereoff I the said Pater Mallary with Mary my wife have hereunto put our hands and seal”, both signing by mark, his mark consisting of his initials P.M., a step higher than signing with a simple cross. New Haven land records, col . 1, p. 370

 

His home lot and most of his land was near the Milford town line at a place commonly called West Side Farms, now West Haven, in the town of Orange. The deed to his son John, dated March 25, 1687, was of ‘land lieing within New Haven township on the west river at the West farms, containing one acre and half, bounded by the highway that runneth from the Oyster point on the north, on the East by land of John clark, on the south by land belon ging to my son Thomas Mallery, on the west by a path that runneth between it and my other land whereon I dwell’. (New Haven land records, vo l. 1, p. 339)

 

That he was a large land owner is evidenced by numerous deeds on record in vol. 1. He repeatedly gave land to his sons John, Peter and Thomas. He also gave land ‘by way of portion in part with my loving daughter Rebecca Bunnell, to my loving soon-in-law Benjamin Bunnell, “dated July 2, 1684, and to his ‘daughter-in-law Mary Mallery widow, relict of Thomas Mallery, my son lately deceased, *** during the nonage of her son Thomas” with the proviso tha t if he died before he is twenty-one, then it shall go to her son Daniel at lawful age, and if he die then to her son Aaron, and if they three all die then “it be and remain un to my said daughter, ***Signed with consent of my son Peter Jr.” april 28, 1691.

 

He appeared in the court records for suing Widow Hodskis for slander. He is listed in the Third Division of New Haven Lands on the 20th of Dec. 1678/9 as having 8 persons in his family with an estate worth $65.00. His son, Peter Jr., had his own house at that time with 2 persons listed. His estate was worth $28.00. “On August 30, 1697, he deeded all his estate undisposed of moveable, real or personal to his son Peter, husbandman, and his son John, in consideration of life support — his wife Mary had been dead then seven years.” He died within a couple years after that.

On August 30, 1697, he deeded all his “estate undisposed of moveable, real or personal, to his son Peter Husbandman and son John cordwainer” in consideration of life support . Vol. 1, p. 729 This deed and one or two others about the same date are signed by a simple P instead of P.M., his usual mark. He was undoubtedly in feeble health and perhaps had been feeble for many years. In the County Court Records, vol.1, p. 45, Move . 8, 1671, we find “This court upon ye allegations p(r)sented on behalf of Peter Mallory Sen( r) for freedom from training doth free him from ye sd service.” He died after Aug 30, 1697, when he disposed of the balance of his property, and before November 24, 1697, when he disposed of the balance of his property, and before November 24, 1701, when John Malary conveys to John Smith “land belonging to y(e) heirs of Thomas Malary***leading down to y(e) dwell ing house formerly belonging to Peter Malary my deceased father.” (New Haven land records, vol. 2, p. 53.) (from James Shepard, New Britain, Conn)

 

Primary immigrant Peter Mallory Massachusetts 1635 Permanent entry number 874882 page number 186 Founders of Early American Families Emigrants for Europe 1607-1657 Meredith B Colket Jr; General Court of the Order of Founders and Patriots of America, 1975, p 366. Passengers and Immigration Lists index.”

 

Children of Mary Preston and Peter Mallory are:

 

  1. Rebecca (Mallory) Bunnell (1649-1691) m. Benjamin Bunnell, brother to Lydia Bunnell
  2. Peter Mallory, b. 27 Jul 1653, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut; d. Abt. 1720, Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut. m. Elizabeth Trowbridge
  3. Mary b. Oct, 1655, d. young
  4. Mary (Mallory) Roberts Cooke (1656-1752) m. Eli Roberts & Samuel Cooke
  5. Thomas (1660-1690) m. Mary Humphreville
  6. Daniel b. Nov. 25, 1661
  7. John b. May 10, 1663, d. after 1712, m. Elizabeth Kimberly
  8. Benjamin b. Jan. 4, 1668
  9. Samuel (1673-1711) m. Mary Beach
  10. William (1675-1738) m. Anna

 

 Peter Mallory

1653-1720

 

 

 

Peter Mallory

Peter Mallory

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Peter Mallory (Peter1) was born 27 Jul 1653, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut to Peter Mallory and Mary Preston. He married Elizabeth Trowbridge  and died Abt. 1720, in Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut.

Farm Life: A majority of New England residents were small farmers. Within these small farm families a man had complete power over the property and his wife. When married, a woman lost her maiden name and personal identity, meaning she could not own property, file lawsuits, or participate in political life, even when widowed. The role of wives was to raise and nurture healthy children and support their husbands. Most women carried out these duties. In the mid-18th century, women usually married in their early 20s and had 6 to 8 children, most of whom survived to adulthood. Farm women provided most of the materials needed by the rest of the family by spinning yarn from wool and knitting sweaters and stockings, making candles and soap, and churning milk into butter.

Most New England parents tried to help their sons establish farms of their own. When sons married, fathers gave them gifts of land, livestock, or farming equipment; daughters received household goods, farm animals, and/or cash. Arranged marriages were very unusual; normally, children chose their own spouses from within a circle of suitable acquaintances who shared their race, religion, and social standing. Parents retained veto power over their children’s marriages.

New England farming families generally lived in wooden houses because of the abundance of trees. A typical New England farmhouse was one-and-a-half stories tall and had a strong frame (usually made of large square timbers) that was covered by wooden clapboard siding. A large chimney stood in the middle of the house that provided cooking facilities and warmth during the winter. One side of the ground floor contained a hall, a general-purpose room where the family worked and ate meals. Adjacent to the hall was the parlor, a room used to entertain guests that contained the family’s best furnishings and the parent’s bed. Children slept in a loft above, while the kitchen was either part of the hall or was located in a shed along the back of the house. Because colonial families were large, these small dwellings had much activity and there was little privacy.

The children of Peter Mallory and Elizabeth Trowbridge are:

 

  1. Peter MALLORY was born Apr 13 1679. He died before Jun 1679 in Died As Infant.
  2. Caleb MALLORY was born Nov 3 1681 and died Jul 20 1716.
  3. Peter MALLORY was born Aug 2 1684. He died before 1690.
  4. Elizabeth MALLORY was born Apr 27 1687.Elizabeth married George WELTON on Dec 10 1712.
  5. Judith MALLORY was born Sep 2 1689.Judith married Jeremiah CANFIELD on Jul 24 1711.
  6. Benjamin MALLORY was born Apr 3 1692.Benjamin married Eunice BUTLER on Dec 22 1715.
  7. Stephen MALLORY was born Oct 12 1694.Stephen married Mary.
  8. Ebenezer MALLORY was born Oct 24 1696.Ebenezer married Sarah RICE.
  9. Zacheus MALLORY was born May 22 1699.Zacheus married Sarah RICE on Apr 17 1722.
  10. Abigail MALLORY was born Aug 5 1701.
  11. Achsah MALLORY. Achsah married Charles LANE on Feb 4 1720.
  12. Zipporah MALLORY was born Dec 15 1705. Zipporah married Jeremiah JOHNSON on Nov 1731.
  13. Peter Mallory was born Mar 1 1708 and died 1826. m. Mary Beardsley. Peter also married (2) Abigail.

 

Peter Mallory

1708-1826

Peter Mallory

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Peter Mallory (Peter2,Peter1 ) was born 1 Mar 1708, in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT to Peter Mallory and Elizabeth Trowbridge . He married Mary Beardsley in 1730. Peter also married (2) Abigail. He died in 1826 in New Haven or Trumbull CT.

 

Peter would have been 68 years of age when the Revolutionary War was waged, so it was unlikely that he served. In the Revolutionary War, one of Peter Mallory’s (Peter, the immigrant1) decendants, Enoch Mallory, deserted from the American Army. He crossed the ice on the St Lawrence River in a hail of bullets, to join the English army drawn up on the opposite bank. There he changed his uniform in view of the enemy. After the war, he was given a grant of land in 1779, where Mallorytown (Canada) was to rise. His brother, Daniel, who had been living in Vermont, settled in Mallorytown in 1784.” They also settled in New Brunswick as well. Another Mallory descendant, Caleb, was also a Loyalist:

 

“I Caleb Mallory of Woodbury, do freely acknowledge That I have sundry times, since the fifth day of March, drank Bohea tea (English Tea), and have said that I did not know nor care for the continental congress, nor their doings which I am now fully convinced was wrong in me, & for which I am very sorry, as I thereby have given just occasion for offense to the good people of this town, and this country in general; and I hereby faithfully promise, for the future,, not to do, nor say any thing, that that be violation of andy doings of said congress; as I am not convinced, that the doings of the said congress are reasonable, and saluatary for this Cournty. Woodbury, August 7th 1775.

 Caleb mallery.
The above aknowledgement being made before the committee of inspection, for said Woodbury the same is accepted by them as satisfactory; he plublishing the said announcement in the public newspapers. By the order of the committees, Daniel Sherman, chairman. A true copy examined, by Increas Moseley, Jr. Clerk.

Twenty Dollars Reward

On Thursday night last, broke gaol in Rutland, Caleb Mallory, who was confined for passing counterfeit money.Said Mallory is about 5 feet 8 inches high, light complexion, grey eyes, about fifty five years old, bald on the forepart and crown of the head, his hair short and of a dark color. It is supposed he has made his way toward Canada, where his family resides. Whoever shall take up said Mallory, and return him to the keeper of the gaol in Rutland shall be entitled to take the above reward, all the necessary charges paid, by Henry Gould Rutland May 1?, 1806

Not all Mallorys refused to fight. Captain Abner, son of Thomas Mallory, was born at Woodbury, July 28, 1723. Following is the official report of the revolutionary service of Captain Mallory: “This is to certify that Abner Mallory served in the War of the Revolution and the following is said service, according to the records of this office.” On page 547 Connecticut Men in the Revolution appears the following: “Abner Mallory. captain, in the list of militia captains whose companies turned out to repel the enemy at New Haven July 5, 1779. Tryon’s Invasion of Connecticut. July 1779, New Haven Alarm, on pages 207-8 Revolution Rules and Lists 1775-83, appears the following: Militia service, the United States Dr. to the State of Connecticut, for services of State Troops and militia between the first of April and first of November raised for the defense of the state and allowed by act of Congress December 28, 1779. computed according to the Continental establishment of Pay. In the list of official Pay Rolls is Captain Abner Mallory. Also joining the fight was Peter’s descendant David Mallory, who during the period of the Revolutionary war joined a regiment of Connecticut troops to battle for the independence of the colonists. His service won recognition in the gift of a land warrant, which was afterward located by his grandson.

 

A list of some Connecticut Mallorys who served in the Revolutionary War:

 

Mallory, Aaron, Aide to Washington.                                     Mallory, John

Mallory, Abner, Capt.                                                              Mallory, John Jr.

Mallory, Daniel                                                                        Mallory, Levi

Mallory, David                                                                         Mallory, Moah

Mallory,Eli                                                                               Mallory, Moses

Mallory, George                                                                       Mallory, Samuel

Mallory, Hugh                                                                          Mallory, Simeon

 

Children of Peter Mallory and Mary Beardsley *are:

 

  1. Peter Mallory, born in 1730 New Haven, New Haven Co., CT; died 1769 in Hamden, New Haven Co., CT.
  2. Mary Mallory, born Abt. 1732 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT; died 19 April    1762 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.
  3. Charity Mallory, born Abt. 1734 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., CT; died 1826 in Salem Parish; married Jesse Hotchkiss 02 October 1759 in Waterbury,CT.
  4. Jonah Mallory, born Abt. 1734.
  5. Samuel Mallory, born Abt. 1736.
  6. Elisha Mallory, born February 1735/36 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT; died 23 March 1812 in Winchester, Litchfield, CT.
  7. Urane Mallory, born Abt. 1738.
  8. Jonah Mallory, born Abt. 1739 in Trumbull, CT; died in Waterbury, CT; married Hannah Smith Abt. 1764 in Westfield, Hampden Co., MA.
  9. Samuel Mallory, born Abt. 1741 in Trumbull, CT.
  10. Andrew Mallory, b. 13 Apr 1743, Stratford, Fairfield Co., Conn
  11. Eliakim Mallory, b. Abt 1748

 

*It is not certain that she is the mother of all the children. (Families of Ancient New Haven p1122).

 

Footnotes for the Mallory Line:

  1. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 115, 159.
  2. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 1, p 379.
  3. Ibid., vol 2, p 358.
  4. Ibid., vol 5, p 1122.
  5. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 159.
  6. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 1, p 379.
  7. Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), vol 3, p 555.
  8. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 2, p 358.
  9. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  10. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1122.
  11. Ibid., vol 5, p 1122.
  12. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  13. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1122.
  14. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  15. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1122.
  16. Ibid., vol 5, p 1122.
  17. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 115.
  18. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 3, p 573.
  19. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  20. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1122.
  21. Ibid., vol 5, p 1122.
  22. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  23. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1123.
  24. Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), vol 2, p 355.
  25. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  26. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1123.
  27. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  28. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1123.
  29. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  30. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1123.
  31. Ibid., vol 5, p 1123.
  32. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  33. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1123.
  34. Baldwin, Charles Candee, The Candee Genealogy : with notices of allied families of Allyn, Catlin, Cooke, Mallery, Newell, Norton, Pynchon, and Wadsworth (Cleveland, Ohio, Leader Printing Company, 1882), 162.
  35. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 5, p 1123.
  36. Portland, Oregon, its history and builders : in connection with the antecedent explorations, discoveries, and movements of the pioneers that selected the site for the great city of the Pacific (1911)

Joseph Mansfield

1636-1692

Immigrant Ancestor

Joseph Mansfield

Martha Mansfield

Martha Sperry

Nicholas Russell

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Joseph Mansfield was born 27 FEB 1636 in Exeter, Devon, England to Richard Mansfield (1611-1655) and Gillian Drake (1615-1669). He married Mary Potter about 1657 in New Haven, CT. Joseph died in Nov 15, 1692 in New Haven, CT.

 

Children of Joseph Mansfield and Mary Potter are:

1.        Mary Mansfield b. 6 APR 1658 Spouses: Thomas Tirban  Henry Wise  John Hill 
2.         Martha Mansfield Born: 18 APR 1660 Spouses: Richard Sperry
3.        Japhet Mansfield Born: 8 JUL 1681 Married: Hannah Bradley  16 JAN 1702/03 Died: 1745       
4.        Mercy Mansfield  Born: 26 JUL 1662 Spouses: John Bristol
5.        Comfort Mansfield Spouses: John Benham
6.        Elizabeth Mansfield Born: 20 SEP 1666   Spouses: William Johnson
7.        Ebenezer Mansfield Born: 6 FEB 1676/77 Married Hannah Bassett  : 20 APR 1710Died: 3 AUG 1745
8.        John Mansfield b.8 APR 1671 d. 22 DEC 1690
9.        Silence Mansfield b. 24 OCT 1664 Spouses: Obadiah Wilcoxson  George Chatfield 
10.     Joseph Mansfield b. 27 DEC 1673 d. 8 OCT 1739 Spouse Elizabeth Thomas

Footnotes

  1. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 2, p 309.
  2. Ibid., vol 1, p 186.
  3. Ibid., vol 5, p 1038.
  4. Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), vol 3, p 154.
  5. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 2, p 309.
  6. Ibid., vol 1, p 186.
  7. Ibid., vol 5, p 1038.
  8. Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), vol 3, p 154.
  9. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 7, p 1578.
  10. http://books.google.com/books?id=k6fDl9gE45IC&pg=RA1-PA470&lpg=RA1-PA470&dq=Joseph+Mansfield+and+Mary+Potter&source=bl&ots=BZj1lv5e9U&sig=BWxhOfbd68FbvgaMcK8bR5fqey4&hl=en&ei=IsezTIr5G8fOnAe496SdBg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CDQQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=Joseph%20Mansfield%20and%20Mary%20Potter&f=false

Martha Mansfield

1660-1730

Mother of Fourteen

Martha Mansfield

Martha Sperry

Nicholas Russell

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Martha Mansfield was born 18 APR 1660 to Joseph Mansfield and Mary Potter in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.  Martha married Richard Sperry December 16, 1680, when she was twenty years of age. She died in 1730 at the age of 70.

Children of Richard Sperry and Martha Mansfield are:

 

  1. Moses Sperry born: 07 JAN 1681 in New Haven, CT Died: 01 MAR 1754 in New Haven, CT  Spouses: Hannah Blakeslee; Dorothy Hale
  2. John Sperry Born: 03 MAR 1684 in New Haven, CT Died: 1754 Spouses: Priscilla HOTCHKISS
  3. Martha Sperry Born: 05 JAN 1686 in New Haven, CT Died: 1758 married William Russell Mar 11, 1706/07 in Sperry Farms, West Rock, New Haven, CT
  4. Joseph Sperry Born: 29 OCT 1687 in New Haven, CT Died: Spouses: Lydia Munson
  5. Mary S Sperry Died: 08 SEP    Spouses: Martha Wooding
  6. James Sperry b. 1693
  7. Jonathan Sperry Born: 07 JUL 1696 in New Haven, CT  Died: 16 APR 1769 in New Haven, CT            Spouses: Mehitabel DOWNS
  8. Stephen Sperry Born: 17 FEB 1699 in New Haven, CT  Died: 17 FEB 1765 in New Haven, CT              Spouses: Lydia HOLT
  9. Silence Sperry Born: 15 JUN 1701 in New Haven, CT died: l 1762  Spouses: Thomas Tuttle
  10. Mercy Sperry Born: 09 JAN 1703 in New Haven, CT Died: l 1779 Spouses: Seth Downs
  11. Japhet Sperry Born: 23 FEB 1706 in New Haven, CT  Died: 17 MAR 1706 in New Haven, CT
  12. Hannah Sperry
  13. Richard Sperry b. 1710
  14. Rubin Sperry b. 1711

 

Footnotes

http://books.google.com/books?id=7_UsAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA1267&lpg=PA1267&dq=Martha+Mansfield+and+Richard+Sperry&source=bl&ots=WFgvJ-JkmC&sig=9LRBp6zmKK3rvMrkW9mBVrrHDak&hl=en&ei=u4SzTML0GMPwngem-uWCBg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CB8Q6AEwAjgK#v=onepage&q=Martha%20Mansfield%20and%20Richard%20Sperry&f=false

  1. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 7, p 1578.
  2. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  3. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  4. Ibid., vol 7, p 1578.
  5. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  6. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  7. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  8. Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), vol 2, p 184.
  9. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 7, p 1666.
  10. Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), vol 2, p 184.
  11. Compiled and edited by Jacqyelyn Ladd Ricker, The Ricker Compilation of Vital Records of Early Connecticut (Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2006), 11965.
  12. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 7, p 1666.
  13. Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), vol 2, p 184.
  14. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 7, p 1666.
  15. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  16. Ibid., vol 8, p 2014.
  17. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  18. Ibid., vol 3, p 573.
  19. Ibid., vol 3, p 645.
  20. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  21. Ibid., vol 7, p 1666.
  22. Ibid., vol 1, p 135.
  23. Ibid., vol 4, p 811.
  24. Ibid., vol 7, p 1667.
  25. Ibid., vol 7, p 1667.
  26. Ibid., vol 7, p 1667.
  27. Ibid., vol 7, p 1667.
  28. W. C. Sharpe, Bethany – Sketches and Records (Record Print; Seymour, CT, 1908), 152.
  29. Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981[originally]Rome, N.Y. and New Haven, Conn., 1922-1932), vol 7, p 1667.
  30. Compiled and edited by Jacqyelyn Ladd Ricker, The Ricker Compilation of Vital Records of Early Connecticut (Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2006), 11966. … by James Bishop JP – New Haven VR.

Rebecca Marbury

1604-1656

Immigrant Ancestress

Rebecca Marbury

Rebecca Maxson

Daniel Mosher

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Rebecca Marbury, daughter of Reverend Francis Marbury (a descendant of Edward I) and Bridget Dryden, was born in 1604 in Alford, Lincolnshire, England. She married Richard Maxson, son of John Maxson and Lois Isabel Monroe in 1624. Rebecca died in 1656 in Portsmouth, Newport, RI.
Portsmouth was settled in 1638 by a group of religious dissenters from Boston Colony, including Dr. John Clarke, William Coddington, and Anne Hutchinson.  Rebecca’s father had gotten into trouble back in England for his religious views, so it is no wonder she ended up with the “radical” people in Rhode Island. Her father’s reformist preaching led to imprisonment in the Marshalsea where he wrote an allegorical play entitled The Contract of Marriage between Wit and Wisdom in 1579. In fact, Marbury found himself imprisoned three times before age 23 for preaching against the incompetence of English ministers and thus by implication, the British monarchy. By 1590, Francis was again in trouble over his quarrels with the Anglican leaders. They accused him of being a Puritan and, even though he won his trial, he was forbidden to preach again for several years.

 

Rhode Island is named after Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. It was founded by the signers of the Portsmouth Compact. Its original Indian name was Pocasset. It was officially named Portsmouth on May 12, 1639.

 Anne Hutchinson, a pioneer settler in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Netherlands and the unauthorized minister of a dissident church discussion group. Hutchinson held Bible meetings for women that soon appealed to men as well. Eventually, she went beyond Bible study to proclaim her own theological interpretations of sermons. Some, such as antinomianism, offended the colony leadership. A major controversy ensued and after a trial before a jury of officials and clergy, she was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Hutchinson is a key figure in the study of the development of religious freedom in England’s American colonies and the history of women in ministry.

Left: “Anne Hutchinson on Trial” by Edwin Austin Abbey

 

 

Alternate dates found:

Died 2: 1656, Westerly, Cumberland, RI, USA
Died 3: 1677, Throggs Neck, NY, USA

 

Children of Rebecca Marbury and Richard Maxson are:

 

  1. Richard Maxson born 1629 in England. Alt. Birth 1630 in Aquidneck, Washington, Rhode Island. He died at age 14.
  2. Reverend John Maxson  b. Mar 1639 in Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. OR He was born on 24 Mar 1638 in Island of Aquidneck, Rhode Island, USA., d. 17 Dec 1720 He married Mary Mosher. They were married Bet. 1661–1665 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut, USA. Alt. Death on 17 Dec 1720 in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island, USA. Title in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island, USA (Reverend). Occupation in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island, USA (Reverend). Burial in First Hopk Cemetery, Ashway, Washington County, Rhode Island, USA.
  3. Rebecca Maxson born in 1640 at Dartmouth, Bristol, MA. Rebecca married her first cousin, Hugh Mosher, and died 1707/08.
  4. Constant Maxson. She was born 1655 in Newport, Rhode  Island, USA. She died 1719 in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island, USA

Elizabeth Marshall

1602-Abt. 1641

Immigrant Ancestress

 

Elizabeth Marshall

William Trowbridge

Elizabeth Trowbridge

Peter Mallory

Charity Mallory

Charity Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Elizabeth Marshall was born 24 Mar 1602 in England, the daughter of John Marshall  and Alice Bevys (Bevis). She was baptized on 24 March 1602 or 1603 at St. Mary Arches Parish, Exeter, England. She married  Thomas Trowbridge, son of John Trowbridge and Agnes Prowse, on 26 March 1623 at Exeter, Devon, England. Elizabeth Marshall died probably in 1641 at New Haven, CT.

 

Elizabeth was mentioned in her father’s will:

 

The will of “John Marshall, Esquire, one of the Aldermen of the City of Exeter,” dated August 8, 1624, was proved by his widow Alice September 17, 1624. It provided that after his debts and funeral expenses were paid “the residue of all my goods and chattels shall according to the custom of the said city of Exeter be divided into three equal parts. I give one portion thereof to my wife. I give one other portion thereof among my three sons and two daughters, that is to say James Marshall, John Marshall, Richard Marshall, Elizabeth Marshall and Susan Marshall. Out of the third portion I give the following legacies, viz, to my son James Marshall so much as shall with the legacy given him by his cousin John Marshall deceased make up 300 pound . To my sons John Marshall and Richard so much as shall with the legacies given them by their cousin John Marshall deceased make up 300 pound each. To my daughter Elizabeth Marshall as much as shall with the legacy left her by her cousin John Marshall deceased make up 400 pound, and to my daughter Susan so much as shall make up 350 pound. Item I give to my daughter Alice Harris my second best gilt bowl. Item I give to my daughter Jane my third best gilt bowl. Item I give to Thomas Milford 3 pound per annum during his life. Item I give to Ebolt Croot of Heavitree 5 pound. Item I give to my servant Agnes Croote 5 marks. Item I give to grace my servant 40s. Item I give to Jane my servant 20s. Item I give Mary Wall 40s. Item I give to the poor of the said City of Exeter 5 pound, whereof 20s to the poor of St Mary Arches parish. Item I give to my said wife the house wherein I now dwell to hold during the term of her life, the remainder thereof to my son James Marshall and his heirs for ever. Item I give my lands and tenements in the parish of Northtowne, called Eastercombe, Westercombe and Luckerton, with the rents thereof to my said wife during her life, the remainder to my said son James Marshall and his heirs for ever. Item I give all my estate and interest of the house wherein Mr. Joseph Trowbridge merchant now dwelleth to my son John Marshall and his heirs forever, provided my wife shall have the issues thereof during her life. Item I give all my estate and interest in the house wherein Master William Martin merchant now dwelleth to my son Richard and his heirs forever, provided my said wife shall have the profits thereof during her life. Item I give my house wherein Andre Quashe merchant now dwelleth in the parish of Petrock’s within the said City of Exeter and also my tenements without Southgate in the parish of the Holy Trinity to my friend John Gupwill Esquire, now Mayor of the said City and Peter Bevis Esquire my brother in law, provided they sell the said tenements as soon as convenient, the said money to be divided into three equal patrs, one part to come to my said wife and the other two parts to be divided equally among my said five children. Item I give to my friends John Gupwill, Peter Bevis and Nicholas Mercer of Exeter merchant, all my tenements in Bampton and my whole estate in the rectory of Bampton in Co. Devon to them and their heirs for ever. Item I give all the rest of my goods and chattels to my said wife, whom I make sole executrix of this my last will. I constitute the said John Gupwill and Peter Bevis overseers of the same and give to each of them 20s for their pains. Witnesses, John Gupwill, Peter Bevis, Nicholas Mercer, Edward Martine, John Trowte.” (Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Byrde, 74).2 He died in August 1624 at Exeter, Devonshire, England.3 His body was interred 17 August 1624 at Exeter, Devonshire, England.

 

She was also mentioned in her mother’s will:

 

Alice Marshall of Exeter made her will 30 December, 1630, and it was proved [P.C.C., 23 St. John] on 24 February, 1630/1. it disposed of a large property, most of it going to her son James Marshall, including premises in Exeter and “messuages and tenements within the manor of Daccombe,” St.. Mary Church, Devon. “Item I give to my daughter Elizabeth (Marshall) Trowbridge £50 awl one piece of plate to the value of £10.” Among grandchildren receiving £5 each were named John and Elizabeth (Marshall) Trowbridge. Other relatives named were brothers Richard and Peter Beavis; sister-in-law Susanna Beavis; four sons of Peter Beavis; Alice Beavis, daughter of brother Nicholas deceased; “mother-in-law Mistress Jane Martyn”; and, in particular, her children, Richard Marshall, Jane Guide, Alice Harris, and Susan Marshall. Susan, for example, was to receive, when of age, enough to make tip £800, including what came to her from her father, cousin John, and brother John.

Elizabeth Marshall’s husband, Thomas Trowbridge has not been chronicled in this record (by Karen Baker) because he returned to England, where he died. He had returned to England because he had hopes of re-marrying after the death of Elizabeth. Thomas was an early settler of Dorchester, Massachusetts. While serving in Cromwell’s Army, he apparently appeared on behalf of a soldier whose pension claim was in dispute in the Taunton Court of Sessions.Thomas and his sons were merchants, trading between Massachusetts, England and the Azores. Military service: 1645, Captain in Cromwell’s Army. Occupation: 1637, Merchant in the Barbados trade. For more information on Thomas Trowbridge, please refer to The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 59,  By Henry Fitz-Gilbert Waters, New England Historic Genealogical Society Pg 291-300.

Children of Elizabeth Marshall and Thomas Trowbridge are:

 

  1. Elizabeth Trowbridge- Bapt. 6 Mar 1627/28 Eng
  2. John Trowbridge – Bapt. 8 Nov 1629; Buried 16 Feb 1653/54 Taunton, Eng
  3. Thomas Trowbridge – Bapt. 11 Dec 1631 Exeter, Devonshire, Eng; d 22 Aug 1702 New Haven, CT; m first 24 Jun 1657 at New Haven, CT to Sarah RUTHERFORD – b 31 Jul 1641 New Haven, CT; d 5 Jan 1686/87 New Haven; dau of Henry & Sarah RUTHERFORD; m second on 2 Apr 1689 New Haven to Hannah NASH – b 24 Jul 1655 New Haven, CT; d 3 Feb 1707/08 New Haven, CT; dau of Maj John NASH & Elizabeth TAPP (other spouse of Elizabeth Tapp was Eliphalet BALL).
  4. William Trowbridge b. September 3, 1633 at St. Petrocks Parish, Exeter, Devonshire, England. m.  Elizabeth Lamberton 9 March 1656/57 at Milford, CT. William died 01 November 1690 (other sites say it could have been earlier) in West Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

 

Amanda Malvina Maxfield

                 1811-1881

          Mother of Fourteen

 

Amanda Malvina Maxfield

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Amanda Malvina Maxfield was born in 1811 in New York. Father: (Unknown) Maxfield, Mother: Malessa (Unknown). She married Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr. 1827 in New York, at the age of 16. After her husband’s death, she remarried 12 Nov 1865 in Hillsdale, Michigan, to Orlando Hinman, aged 73. Four years previously, he had married a “Mary Parish”. Amanda is listed as living with her daughter Ophelia and her husband, (Per 1880 Census of Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan) with the name Amanda Henman. Her son Milliard Russell was also living there at that time. She died March 11, 1881 in Ransom, Hillsdale Co., MI, and is buried there.  The home pictured was standing when she lived in the area; it was not hers.

 

Children of Amanda Malvina Maxfield and Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr. are:

 

  1. John A. Russell b. May 28, 1828 in New York d May 2, 1867 at  Ripley twp. Huron Co., OH m February 2, 1851 at Huron Co., OH Spouse’s name: Mary LEWIS
  2. Harriett E. Russell b. 1835 in New York d: Bef. 1900 at: Jefferson twp., Hillsdale Co., MI m: abt 1857 at: Hillsdale Co., MI to: Charles N. HANIBEL
  3. Margaret Jane Russell b: 1833 at: New York
  4. Horace C. Russell b.: February 1835 at: New York d.: aft. 1900 at: Fayette, Fulton Co., OH m: abt 1857 at. : Fayette twp. Huron Co., OH Spouse’s name: Lovina Getter
  5. Ophelia A. Russell b. 1837 at: Huron Co., OH m.: September 30, 1855 at: Hillsdale Co., MI Spouse’s name: Alonzo T. Parmelee d. 1914 at: Ransom, Hillsdale Co., MI Buried* Maple Grove Cemetery Hillsdale Co., MI  Headstone for Alonzo reads for him and “Amanda O.” Was that the name Ophelia went under? It was her mother’s name, but it is doubtful that her mother lived that long.
  6. Orindia Angeline Russell b.: May 14, 1838 at: Huron Co., OH d.: Aft. 1900 at: Fairfield twp., Huron Co., OH m.: abt 1856 at:: Fairfield twp., Huron Co., OH Spouse’s name: Edward BOWEN
  7. 7: Malissa Russell b.: Abt 1841 at: Huron Co., OH d at: Tecumsah, Lenawee Co., MI  m: Abt. 1864 Spouse’s name: Abijah Vige PACKARD
  8. Mary Russell b.: 1842 at: Huron Co., OH d. at: Michigan m.: Abt 1863 at: MI Spouse’s name: Thomas BRYCE
  9. Lucretia Russell b.1842 at : Huron Co., OH d.: May 2, 1861 Died and Buried: Ransom, Hillsdale Co., MI
  10. Henry Clay Russell b.: February 2, 1849 at: Huron Co., OH d.: December 2, 1862 Died and Buried: Ransom, Hillsdale Co., MI
  11. Francis Russell b.: July 23, 1850 at: Greenfield, Huron Co., OH d.: 1858 at MI
  12. Benjamin Franklin Russell b. July 23, 1850 at: Greenfield, Huron Co., OH d.: September 14, 1919 at: St. Louis, Gratiot Co., MI buried: Jasper twp, Midland Co., MI m: February 7, 1880 at Jefferson, Hillsdale Co., MISpouse: Frances Anna BUTLER
  13. Alvira C. Russell b.: August 28, 1852 at: Huron Co., OH d.: May 27, 1866 at: Ransom, Hillsdale Co., MI
  14. Millard Russell b,: 1855 ay: Huron Co., OH d.& buried: Ransom twp., Hillsdale Co., MI

 

Documentation: Various census years found at Ancestry.com, Family knowledge by great aunt daughter of Benjamin Franklin Russell, Civil War papers for Benjamin Franklin Russell, information from George Russell certified genealogist. Riverus Russell Sr. revoltionary soldier records. Other records found at Familysearch.com and familytreemaker.com and at ancestry.com.

 

John Maxon

1586-1643

Immigrant Ancestor

Double Ancestor

 

John Maxon                                   John Maxon

Richard Maxon                             Lydia Maxon (married Nicholas Mosher)

Rebecca Maxon(married Hugh Mosher)   Hugh Mosher

Daniel Mosher                               Daniel Mosher

George Mosher                              George Mosher

Samuel Mosher                              Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher                                  Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard                                Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard                          Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh                         Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh                      Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John Maxon was born in Blackmouth, England in 1586. He married Lois Isabel Monroe. John died 1643 in Long Island City, Queens, New York

Children of Lois Isabel Monroe. and John Maxon are:

 

  1. Richard Maxson b. Abt. 1602 in Boston, Suffolk, MA
  2. 2.        Lydia Maxon, b. 1612, Portland, Cumberland, ME, USA488, d. 02 Feb 1718, Tiverton, RI, USA488.

 

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hcpd/norman/MAXSON

OneWorldTree, Ancestry.com. One World Tree (sm) [database online]. Provo, UT: MyFamily.com, Inc.

 

Lydia Maxson

1610-1718

Immigrant Ancestress

Lydia Maxon

Hugh Mosher

Daniel Mosher

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Lydia Maxon was born 1610 in Cucklington,Somersetshire England, and died 1680 in Tiverton,Newport Co. RI. She married Nicholas Mosher in 1632 in Cucklington, Somersetshire England. Another source says Lydia died 02 Feb 1718, Tiverton, RI, USA.

 

The book Descendants of Hugh Mosher and Rebecca Maxson Through Seven Generations, by Chamberlain and Clarenbach, revised 1990, states: Lydia Maxson as Nicholas Mosher ‘s wife which fits into Rhode Island’s records perfectly. Hugh’s mother was known to be living in 1677, and in 1680 Lydia and Rebecca Mosher were members of his church in Tiverton. He was not known to have had a daughter named Lydia and his first daughter-in-law, Lydia was then about fourteen years in the future. In early colonial days it was common for first cousins to marry, and if Lydia Maxson was a sister of Richard Maxson of Portsmouth whose widow married John Harndell of Newport, here were two marriages of first cousins: Lydia’s daughter, Mary and son Hugh to Richard’s son John and daughter Rebecca.

 

Children of Lydia Maxson and Nicholas Mosher are:

 

  1. Hugh Mosher, b. 12 Jun 1633, Cucklington,Somersetshire England, d. 07 Dec 1713, Newport,Newport Co. RI USA.
  2. Mary (Mercy) Mosher, b. 1640, Westerly,Washington Co.RI, d. 02 Feb 1718, Westerly,Washington Co.RI.
  3. John Mosher, b. 1635, Cucklington,Somersetshire England, d. 07 Dec 1656, Newport,Newport Co. RI USA.
  4. Daniel Mosher, b. 1638, Cucklington,Somersetshire England, d. 1656, Newport,Newport Co. RI USA.

 

(Davis-Johnson, G. Maria; mjohnson80@adelphia.net; “Descendents of Seventh Day Baptist, William Davis (1663-1745) Wales>PA>RI>NJ>WV>NY>WI and other family branches”; 3 June 2004; www.ancestry.com.)

 

Rebecca Maxson

1640-1708/08

Rebecca Maxson

Daniel Mosher

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Rebecca Maxson (Richard1 ), was born in 1640 at Dartmouth, Bristol, MA. She was the daughter of Richard Maxson and Rebecca Marbury . Rebecca Maxson married her first cousin, Hugh Mosher, and died 1707/08.

 

Relationship Line:

John Maxon                                   John Maxon

Richard Maxon                              Lydia Maxon (married Nicholas Mosher)

Rebecca Maxon——————-àHugh Mosher

 

In our lore, cousin marriages are unnatural, the province of hillbillies and swamp rats, not Rothschilds and Darwins. In the United States they are deemed such a threat to mental health that 31 states have outlawed first-cousin marriages. This phobia is distinctly American, a heritage of early evolutionists with misguided notions about the upward march of human societies. Their fear was that cousin marriages would cause us to breed our way back to frontier savagery—or worse. “You can’t marry your first cousin,” a character declares in the 1982 play Brighton Beach Memoirs. “You get babies with nine heads.”

 

So when a team of scientists led by Robin L. Bennett, a genetic counselor at the University of Washington and the president of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, announced that cousin marriages are not significantly riskier than any other marriage, it made the front page of The New York Times. The study, published in the Journal of Genetic Counseling, determined that children of first cousins face about a 2 to 3 percent higher risk of birth defects than the population at large. To put it another way, first-cousin marriages entail roughly the same increased risk of abnormality that a woman undertakes when she gives birth at 41 rather than at 30. Banning cousin marriages makes about as much sense, critics argue, as trying to ban childbearing by older women.

 

But the nature of cousin marriage is far more surprising than recent publicity has suggested. A closer look reveals that moderate inbreeding has always been the rule, not the exception, for humans. Inbreeding is also commonplace in the natural world, and contrary to our expectations, some biologists argue that this can be a very good thing. It depends in part on the degree of inbreeding.

 

Children of Hugh Mosher and Rebecca Maxson are:

 

  1. Daniel Mosher, born Abt. 1660; died Bet. July 22 – September 19, 1751 in Dartmouth, Massachusetts; married Mary Elizabeth Edwards.
  2. Hannah Mosher, died Aft. January 23, 1716/17; married Steven Cornell; died Unknown.
  3. Ann Mosher, died Aft. 1721; married Peter Lee Bef. January 30, 1692/93
  4. Nicholas Mosher, born 1666 or 1664 Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island;married
  5. Elizabeth Autley; died d. August 14, 1747, Tiverton, Newport County, Rhode Island.
  6. John Mosher, died Unknown.
  7. Joseph Mosher, b. Abt. 1670, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts; d. Bef. March 23, 1754, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts.
  8. Mary Mosher, died Unknown; married Joseph Rathburn May 19, 1691; died bef. 1748
  9. Rebecca Mosher, born 1677; died Aft. April 28, 1746; married John Kirby; died Unknown.
  10. James Mosher, b. 1675; d. Abt. 1768, Beekman, Dutchess County, New York.

 

Other sources: Rebecca Maxson was born on 06 Feb 1631 in England. Alt. Birth on 06 Feb 1637 in Aquidneck, Washington, Rhode Island, USA. She died on 24 Dec 1707 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA. Alt. Death Dec 1708 in Rhode Island, USA

 

Rebecca is linked to Gladys Burdick through her brother, John Maxon.

The book Descendants of Hugh Mosher and Rebecca Maxson Through Seven Generations, by Chamberlain and Clarenbach

 

Richard Maxon (Maggsen)

1602- Abt. 1643

Immigrant Ancestor

Founding Family of Portsmouth

Founded the 7th Day Baptist Church

Blacksmith

Richard Maxon

Rebecca Maxson

Daniel Mosher

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Richard Maxon (John1 ) was was born in 1601 in England to John Maxon. He married married Rebecca Marbury about 1627 in England. Richard died in 1643 in Throgg’s Neck NY or RI.

 
It is believed that Richard and his wife, Rebecca, came to America in 1634 on the ship "Griffin", which brought Anne Hutchinson and her family. There is speculation that the two families were related, but I believe that Richard was probably an advocate of Anne's beliefs. Anne's husband was a wealthy merchant and Richard was a blacksmith, which would put them on different social strata. It is certain that there was a closeness between Richard and Anne. When she was 'banned in Boston', he joined the group which went with her to Rhode Island, but didn't wait to get paid for it, so it would seem that it was important to him to go with Anne.

Richard’s name is found in the membership records of the First Church Boston where he is listed on The 2d of eight month (October) 1634 as “Richard Magson, servant to our brother James Everill.” (Therefore we know he landed in Boston some time before that date, probably as an indentured servant.)   

 Richard was admitted to the Church in Boston on August 2, 1634. As stated, he went to Rhode Island with the Hutchinson group and as a blacksmith was a valued member of  the community. He was granted land by the group in both Newport (36 acres) and Portsmouth. (The Newport land is now a public park). He is listed as one of the founders of Poasset (Portsmouth) and was a freeman at the settlement of the town of Newport.
The next mention of Richard’s name is in Portsmouth, 7 February 1638, where complaints for oppression of trade are made against Richard Maxon, naming his trade as a blacksmith. He was chastised for profiteering and promised amendment and satisfaction. (So we know that he moved to Portsmouth before this date, possibly March 1638: the first month.).

 

Richard Maxson was one of the founders of Portsmouth (Poasset). Richard Maxson and his wife, who came from England, were the ancestors of all the Seventh-Day Baptist Maxsons in this country.

In 1639, Richard Maggsen, with other men from Portsmouth, signed an oath of loyalty to King Charles. Richard Maxon is listed as an inhabitant of the Island of Aquidneck (RI) in 1640.

The next record we have of Richard is at the time of his sale of property, 25 June 1642. In the land records of Portsmouth, on the Island of Aquidneck we find that Richard Magson sold to William Baulston (Ballston/Balston) one house and five and three quarters acres of land.

Richard followed Anne Hutchinson to what is now Pelham Bay, on Long Island in 1642. The story is that they traded with and got on well with the Indians until the Pequot Wars. The local Indians then stopped trading and used as their excuse that they were afraid of the unconfined dogs. They said they would resume trading if the dogs were tied. This accomplished, they attacked the settlement and massacred all but one of Anne's family. (Of her fourteen children, she may have had six or seven there with her.) Richard and his family got to their boat, but Richard and young Richard went ashore for provisions and were massacred. Rebecca and young Rebecca and John made it back to Rhode Island in the small open boat. Her son John was born soon afterward, in 1638. Several authorities state that he was the first white child born on the island of Rhode Island. In 1661 John joined a company formed at Newport for the purchase and Settlement of the tract of land called Misquanicut. The massacre occurred in 1643. In 1644, Rebecca was paid by William Roulston for the property Richard sold him in 1642.

Children of Richard Maxon and Rebecca Marbury.
  1. Richard Maxson b. c 1630, d. 1643 (Died at age 14)
  2. Rebecca Maxson,  b. 6 Feb 1636/37, Dartmouth, Bristol Co., MA, USA d. Aft 27 Dec 1707/08, RI, USA]   (70 years)
  3. Reverend John Maxson  b. Mar 1638/39, d. 17 Dec 1720 m. Mary Mosher

 

Register Report, online http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~sam/mosher.html#G1

] Maxson Family Association, online http://www.maxson2000.net/

Barbara Metzger Von Weibnom*

Est. 1744-

Dutch Royalty

Immigrant Ancestress

Barbara Metzger Von Weibnom

Anna Barbara Richard

Jacob Kroh

Daniel Bernard Kroh

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Barbara Metzger Von Weibnom was born est.1744. She married Unknown Richard/Reichart/Reichert.


My husband’s mother Ruth (Kroh) Baker always told me that her line came from Dutch Royalty, and this is what I have found:

 

Excerpt from “Sixty Years of California Song

 

As far back as I can remember my life was associated with music. Father and mother were both highly gifted. In our family were three boys and seven girls, and each possessed a voice of unusual excellence. The looked-for pleasure every day was the morning and evening worship at which the family gathered in the sitting room to hear the word of God explained by my father, Rev. Henry Kroh, D.D. The dear old German hymns, Lobe den Herren, O Meine Seele, Christie, duLamm Gottes and others, were as familiar to me as the English hymns of today, such as Nearer my God to Thee and All Hail the Power of Jesus’ Name. We were not blessed with children’s songs, as are the children of today, but sang the same hymns as the older members of the congregation.

 

Father was descended from a royal Holland family. One of his ancestors was the favorite sister of Admiral Theobold Metzger, Baron of Brada, Major-General of all the Netherlands, who died of paralysis in the sixty-sixth year of his life, February 23, 1691, in the house of the Duke of Chamburg. He had gone with other lords and nobles of the land to Graven Hage to swear allegiance to William III., King of Great Britain, who had just come over from London as the regent of the Netherlands. Even the physician in ordinary, who was sent by the King, was unable to save him. By order of the King his body was placed in a vault in the church on High Street in Brada, March 19, 1691, with extraordinary honor and ceremonies. He had acquired large possessions and wealth, therefore the King ordered that the large estate of the deceased should be taken care of, and placed it under the care of William von Schuylenburg, council of the King. At the same time notice was sent to all princes and potentates in whose countries there was property of the deceased to support His Majesty in this undertaking. Three weeks before his death he had made his will and had given the name of his parents and his five brothers and two sisters.

 

His sister Barbara was my great-grandmother. After the death of my granduncle some of the family came to America. They were not aware of the death of their distinguished brother and the heirs did not claim the vast fortune, which amounted to 20,000,000 guilders at that time and now with compound interest should be to 200,000,000 to 300,000,000 guilders, and is still in the possession of the King and in the treasuries of the Netherlands. The heirs have been deprived of it all these years, although they have from one generation to another fought the case. At the same time the authorities of Holland are not a little in doubt and are embarrassed for reasons to justify keeping the Metzger von Weibnom estate for Holland.

 

But the reason of all their decisions, answers and refusals is the unmistakable intention to keep the estate for themselves, even at the cost of truth, justice and honor. The will has been suppressed. We have proof that General Rapp in 1794 at the occupation of Brada had taken the will, dated February 2, 1691, from the city magistrate to carry it to Strassburg for safety. The will has never been executed. I purposely made this break in my narrative of my childhood in justice to my distinguished father who should have occupied the place that belonged to him by right and title, as he was one of the original heirs mentioned in my uncle’s will–the grandson of his favorite sister, Barbara Metzger von Weibnom.

 

There is more to this story which I have deleted, as it is not germane to our family branch.

You may find the entire text at: http://infomotions.com/etexts/gutenberg/dirs/1/9/5/2/19528/19528.htm

Title: Sixty Years of California Song

Author: Alverson, Margaret Blake, 1836-1923

 

One would think that, with as many people who are interested in the “vast inheritance”, there would be more information on one of the principals in line to inherit…Barbara. However, that does not seem to be the case, as I can find NOTHING about her adult life, other than the fact that she had at least one child. There was a “Reichert” family in Berks County, PA, but nearly all of them were massacred by Indians. The story follows:

June 30. About noon the two corporals returned and made the following report: That yesterday they could not reach the place, as they were tired, but staid at a house till nigh break of day, and then set off again. He did not immediately go to the place where the man, &c, were killed, but went somewhat further down towards the Schuylkill, thinking that the Indians had invaded lower down, but as it was not so, he took another route towards the place where the murder was committed, and as he came there he found the man’s wife (Fred. Myers) who had been at a plough, and shot through both her breasts and was scalped. After that he went to look for the man, whom they found dead and scalped some way in the woods. They took a ladder and carried him to his wife, where the neighbors came and helped to bury them, after which they went towards the mountain, and scouted along the same and arrived here about four o’clock in the afternoon. It is reported by the farmers who saw the deceased a short while before, that he was mowing in his meadow, and that his children were about him, which makes them believe that the man, after he had heard the shot (which killed his wife), went to run off with only the youngest child in his arms, as the man was shot through his body, and the child is one and a half years of age and is scalped, but yet alive, and is put at a doctor’s. The other three, who were with their father, are taken prisoners ; one of them is a boy about ten years old, the other a girl of eight years, and the other a boy of six years. There was a baby, whom they found in a ditch, that the water was just to its mouth. It was lying on its back crying. It was taken up, and is like to do well. A boy of one Reichard, of eight years, was taken prisoner at the same time. This was all done within half an hour, as some neighbors had been there in that space of time.”

This heart-rending tragedy occurred about a mile and a half north of Shartlesville, in Upper Bern, on the farm now owned by Frederick Moyer, the grandson of the little child that had such a narrow escape from cruel death. I visited this place on December 19, 1879, and heard Mr. Moyer’s account of the massacre as it was handed down by tradition, and was surprised to find that it coincided in so many particulars with the account given by the commander of Fort Northkill. Frederick Moyer was one of the first settlers in that part of the county. He selected a piece of excellent ground, through which flows a stream of crystal water. He and his family were engaged in one of the most honorable and ancient occupations of life, enjoying health and full of bright hopes for the future, the little children frisking around, and tossing the new mown grass in their childish merriment, and surrounded as they were by the picturesque soonery of the Blue Mountains, and the beauties of nature which are so abundant there, they must have been in the enjoyment of real happiness without any thought of danger, but suddenly the Indian rushed from the woods and shot the mother, the father picked up the most helpless child, and in his efforts to escape also fell a victim to the barbarity of the Indians. Three young children were dragged into the wilds of the Blue Mountains by men who had murdered their parents, and who would undertake to describe the thoughts, feelings and anxieties of these young prisoners in the hands of men whom they feared and hated so bitterly..’

Tradition says that the child found in the ditch was scalped and otherwise hurt, and died afterwards.

The child Frederick that was scalped and put to a doctor, was also shot through the arm, probably pierced by the bullet that killed the father, but recovered and in due time became the owner of the farm and died at the age of 78 years. The property then came into the possession of his son, Jacob M., and after his death, into the possession of his grandson, Frederick, who is the present owner. Mr. Mover informed me that his grandfather died 50 years ago. The traditional date therefore, agrees precisely with that given by the commander at Fort Northkill.

The Reichard mentioned in the report belonged to a family living on the farm now owned by Mr. Daniel Berger. Tradition says that the Reichard family was murdered, except one of the boys, whom the Indians had intended to take prisoner. Mr. Reichard used to tell his children if the Indians should come and attempt to take any of them alive they should resist to their utmost. This young boy wishing to carry out his father’s request, continued to resist, and, when the Indians had brought him as far as to Moyer’s, they, irritated by his insubmissiou, killed him with their tomahawks and scalped him.

 

The child of Barbara Metzger Von Weibnom and (Unknown) Reichart/Reichert/Richard is:

 

  1. 1.        Anna Barbara Richard

 

*It is my understanding that the name “Barbara Metzger Von Weibnom” means “Barbara Metzger from Weibenheim”. The ending : nem or nom is for heim, which means home. The family name went through a period of transition from the German “METZGER” to the English translation of “BUTCHER”. In the German language(s), the occupation of a butcher is known by the names, schlachter, fleisher, and metzger; when Anglicized, these became Slaughter, Flesher and Metzger. Metzger was usually spelled correctly by literate Germans (ministers); however, when spoken through a thick German accent and interpreted by semi-literate settlers, it got distorted. Spelled phonetically, Metzger was written as Matzger, Mitsker, Matcher,Medsker, Mischarles, Mitcher, Mitscaw, and Mitchkar.

 

There was another Reichert in the area at that time…possibly related to her husband? Reichert –GERMAN- Conrad Reichert Senior was born in Tulpehocken, Berks County,PA  in 1741 and died 1828 in Mannheim Township, Schuylkill County,PA. 

 

http://metzgerreunion.com/page3/files/page2_4.pdf

http://genforum.genealogy.com/metzger/messages/437.html

Johanna Mew

1611-1678

Immigrant Ancestress

Johanna Mew

Samuel Munson

John Munson

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Johanna Mew was born 1611 in Stembury, Hampshire, England to Richard Mew and Ann Stone. Thomas Munson (son of John Munson and Elizabeth Spark) and Johanna were married in England.She died on 13 Dec 1678 in New Haven, Connecticut. She was buried on 15 Dec 1678 in Grove St. Cemetery, New Haven, Connecticut.No headstone for her  remains, but she has an inscription on her husband’s replacement stone.

 

Johanna and her husband came to America on the ship Elizabeth in 1634. They settled in Hartford, Ct., and then moved to New Haven, Ct.

Children of Thomas Munson and Jo(h)anna Mew are:

  1. Annie Munson*, born 1623 in England; died 1656; married John Stebbins 1646 in Springfield, MA.
  2. 2.        Samuel James Munson b. August 07, 1643, New Haven, Connecticut, married Martha Bradley October 26, 1665 d. February 03, 1692/93, New Haven, Connecticut.
  3. Elizabeth Munson b. December 07, 1642, d. date unknown.
  4. Hannah Munson b. June 11, 1648, d. date unknown. m. Joseph TUTTLE (1640-1690)
  5. Obadiah Munson*

 

The Elizabeth II is a representative sailing ship berthed at Roanoke Island Festival Park across from the Manteo waterfront in North Carolina. It is modeled after the ship Elizabeth, which sailed from England in 1585. The Elizabeth II is 69 feet long, 17 feet wide and draws 8 feet of water

*Annie (or, Mary Anne and Obadiah Munson are not listed in many sites as a daughter and son of Thomas and Johanna.

Martha Miles

1632-1662

Immigrant Ancesoress

Martha Miles

Mary Pardee

Stephen Hotchkiss

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Martha Miles was christened on 11 June 1632 at Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. She was born circa 1633 at Wormley, Hertfordshire, England. She was the daughter of Richard Miles and Mary Katherine Elithorpe. Martha married George Pardee, son of Reverend Anthony Pardee and Anstice Cox, on 20 October 1650 at New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. Martha died in 1662 at New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. She predeceased her father.

 

The “NE” coins (replicated shilling shown above), released in 1652, were the first coins ever minted in the New World, outside of Mexico. Images courtesy of EarlyAmerican.com.

Martha married George the year that Miles Standish died at age 72.

 

                       American Currency

 

From the inception of the first American settlements onward, Great Britain failed to seriously consider the coinage problems mounting in her colonies across the Atlantic.

Since the British Parliament evidently was not going to provide more coins for the hard-pressed colonists, some of the more industrious Americans opted to take the matter into their own hands. By law, the British Crown possessed sole authority over coinage. Without seeking permission, the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony contracted John Hull to begin minting coins. Hull set up a mint in Boston and began producing the well-known “NE” [New England] coins in 1652, the denominations being three pence, six pence, and one shilling. The design simplicity on the NE coins was an easy target for counterfeiters, leading to the better known “Pine Tree” coinage, minted from 1667-1682, though all bore the date 1652. This was to deceive the British, who had raised objections about the “NE” coins of 1652, into believing that colonial coins were discontinued beyond that year. Willow and Oak tree coins also were struck.

 

Children of Martha Miles and George Pardee are:

 

  1. John Pardee   born Aug 20, 1651 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died Jun 28, 1653 in New Haven, New Haven, CT
  2. John Pardee   born Dec 02, 1653 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died 1683 in New Haven, New Haven, CT
  3. George Pardee  born Jan 16, 1655 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died Nov 27, 1723 in East Haven, New Haven, Connecticut Burial: East Haven, , Ct Christening: May 13, 1662, Cong, Nh, Ct
  4. Mary Pardee   Born Apr 18, 1658 in New Haven, New Haven, CT;died in New Haven, New Haven, Conn Christening: May 13, 1662, New Haven, New Haven, CT
  5. Elizabeth Pardee   born Jun 10, 1660 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died Aft. 1705 in Norwalk, New Haven, CT; married Lieut. John OLMSTEAD 1695 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT
  6. Joseph PARDEE, born Apr 27, 1664 in New Haven (twp), New Haven, Ct died in West Haven, New Haven, Ct Burial: West Haven, New Haven, Connecticut Christening: Apr 27, 1664, New Haven, New Haven, , Conn

 

Richard Miles

Abt. 1610-1666

Immigrant Ancestor

Deacon, Judge, Farmer

Richard Miles

Martha Miles

Mary Pardee

Stephen Hotchkiss

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Richard Miles was born on Aug 27 1598 in Wormley, Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England to Parents: Rychard Myles and Alice Cherrye. He was christened on Aug 27 1598 in , Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. He was married to Mary Katherine Elithorpe in 1641/42 in New Haven, Fairfield, , Connecticut. He was married to Catherine Constable before 1642 in New Haven, New Haven, CT. He died on Jan 16 1666 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut.

He was a Deacon, a judge and a husbandman (farmer).  His will was written 28 Dec 1666. Bequeaths were made to his eldest son Richard and to the rest of children living, and to children of deceased daughter Martha. The estate which came to him through his wife Katherine was to go to her children in England by a former marriage. Katherine, his wife, was made executrix , and Capt. John Nash, John Cooper, and James Bishop to be overseers. Witnesses: Roger Alling and Abraham Dowlittle. Inventory taken 8 Dec 1669, by John Cooper and Richard Alling, £288-06-10£288-06-10.

Children of Richard Miles and Mary Katherine Elithorpe are:

  1. Francis Miles was born on Jan 24 1627/28 in Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. She was buried on Sep 15 1628.
  2. Anne Miles, b. about 1630 in England
  3. Martha Miles    christened on 11 June 1632 at Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. She was born circa 1633 at Wormley, Hertfordshire, England., m. George Pardee, d. 1662
  4. Mary Ince Miles, was christened on Aug 30 1623 in Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. She was born in 1635 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. She died on Sep 12 1730 in New Haven, New Haven, CT. She was buried on Oct 24 1983. She was married to Jonathan INCE on Dec 12 1654 in , New Haven Co., Connecticut.She was married to Thomas HANFORD Rev. on Oct 22 1661 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.
  5. Richard Miles,  was born in 1637 in Wormley, Hertfordshire, England. He died in 1669 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, m. Experience COLLICATT on Sep 8 1659
  6. Samuel Miles, was born on Apr 12 1640 in Milford, New Haven, CT. He was christened on Apr 22 1640 in Milford, Fairfield Co., CT. He died on Dec 24 1678 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. He was married to Elizabeth DOWSE on Oct 16 1659 in Boston, , Mass.He was married to Hannah WILMOT on Apr 9 1667 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
  7. Anna Miles, was born on Oct 7 1642 in Wallingford, Fairfield, Conn., Connecticut. She was christened on Oct 7 1642 in Wallingford, Fairfield, , Connecticut. She died on Apr 11 1687 in Wallingford, Fairfield, , Connecticut. She was buried on Apr 11 1687 in Wallingford, Fairfield, , Connecticut. She was married to Sammuel STREET on Nov 3 1664 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
  8. Hannah Miles, was born on Oct 7 1642 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut. She was christened on Oct 7 1642 in , Milford, New Haven, CT. She died on Jul 19 1730. to Samuel STREET on Nov 3 1664.
  9. John Miles Capt.. was born in Oct 1644 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. He was christened in Oct 1644 in Congregational, Church, New Haven, Conn.. He died on Nov 7 1704 in Nh, Nh, CT. He was buried in Grove St Cem, New Haven, CT. He has Ancestral He was married to Experience HERRIMAN on Apr 11 1665 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts.He was married to Mary ALSOP on Nov 2 1680 in New Haven, New Haven, Conn.

Another site gives this information:

1. Richard1 Miles was born Aug 17, 1598 in Wormley, Co. Herts, England, and died Jan 07, 1665/66 in New Haven, CT. He married (1) Mary Chambers. He married (2) Katherine Elithorpe. She died Jan 27 1688 in Walingford CT age 90.

Children of Richard Miles and Mary Chambers are:

  1. Martha MILES, born Abt. 1633; died Bef. 1662.
  2. Mary MILES, born Abt. 1635; died Sep 12, 1730.
  3. Richard MILES, born Abt. 1637.
  4. Samuel MILES, bp. Apr 22 1640 in New Haven, CT.; died Dec 24, 1678 in New Haven, CT.

The first child may have been Francis who was born Jan 24 1627 Wormely, Co. Herts. England and died Sep 15 1628.

The Mother of the last two could be Katherin Elithorpe

  1. Anna MILES, bp. Oct 7 1642 in New Haven, CT; died Jul 19, 1730 in Wallingford, CT.
  2. JOHN MILES, bp. Oct 1644 in New Haven, CT; died Nov 07, 1704 in New Haven, CT.

And another site: Deacon Richard Miles was christened on 27 August 1598 at Wormley, Great Munden, Hertfordshire, England. He married Catherine Elithorpe circa 1637 at of New Haven, New Haven, CT. Deacon Richard Miles died on 16 January 1666 at Milford, New Haven, CT, at age 67.

Sibil/Sybil Mitchell

Est. 1571-1596-Est. 1613-1685

Immigrant Ancestress

Founding Family of Milford, CT

Sibil Mitchell

Elizabeth Prudden

Alice Pritchard

Martha Bradley

John Munson

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Sybil Mitchell was born WFT Est. 1571-1596. She was married to James Prudden on 7 Apr 1608 in Kings Walden, Hertfordshire, England.  She may have been his second wife. She died WFT Est. 1613-1685.

Sybil Mitchell  and  James Prudden probably came to Boston in about 1637 with James’ brother, Rev. Peter Prudden, and a number under his leadership. These were known as the “Hertford” group, after the English county from which they had been recruited.The group was persuaded to join the Eaton-Davenport company which sailed from the Massachusetts Bay Colony to the Quinnipiac Harbor in New Haven, CT in April 1638.

Prudden’s followers moved some eight miles west in 1639 to establish their own settlement of Milford, CT. Sybil and her family had two acres of land, lot #8 on the west side of the river, and were admitted to the Milford Church 13 Oct. 1639.

Children of Sybil Mitchell and James Prudden are:

  1. Elizabeth Prudden, was christened 17 Dec 1615 and died 29 Apr 1666.
  2. Ann PRUDDEN was christened 8 Feb 1617 and died 3 Oct 1689.

 

Some sites have Sybil Mitchell as having died in England.

 

Lois Isabel Monroe

1588-

Twice an Ancestoress

 

Lois Monroe                                   Lois Monroe

Richard Maxon                              Lydia Maxon (married Nicholas Mosher)

Rebecca Maxon——————à Hugh Mosher

Daniel Mosher                               Daniel Mosher

George Mosher                              George Mosher

Samuel Mosher                              Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher                                  Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard                                Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard                         Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh                         Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh                     Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

 

Lois Isabel Monroe was born in 1588. . She married John Maxson.

Children of Lois Isabel Monroe and John Maxson are:

  1. Richard Maxson, b. 1602, Boston, Suffolk, MA, d. 1639, Westerly, Washington, RI.
  2. Lydia Maxson, b. 1612, Portland, Cumberland, ME, d. 02 Feb 1718, Tiverton, RI.

Hannah Morgan

1642-1677

Hannah Morgan

Thomas Royce

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hannah Morgan (James1 ), daughter of James Morgan and Margery Hill was born 18 Jul 1642, Roxbury, Suffolk Co., MA.  She married Nehemiah Royce 20 Nov 1660 in New London, Connecticut, and died Suffolk County, Massachusetts and died unknown. I am saying the death date is unknown because different sources give vastly different dates; one saying she died within a month of her husband, and others saying she died young and he remarried.  Obviously, she lived long enough to give birth to Nehimiah Jr. in 1682/83. The site “findagrave.com” has her death as Jun. 19, 1677 in Wallingford.

 

In colonial times, the preferred color for a wedding dress was red, which makes sense, when you think about it. Fabric made of cotton is white, unless you make the time and effort to dye it. Linen, which is made of fibers from the flax plant, is naturally cream or light tan in color. And unless you have black sheep, any woolen garment is, again, white or off-white. White clothes were cheap. But red, real, vermillion red – now that was expensive like a wedding dress should be!

 

Hannah was the  3-Great grandmother of Pres. Millard Fillmore.

 

Children of Nehemiah Royce and Hannah Morgan are:

 

  1. Margery Royce, B. Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. 12 Sep 1683, Wallingford, New Haven,Connecticut
  2. Mercy Royce, B. Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. 04 Feb 1675/76, Wallingford, New Haven,Connecticut.
  3. Joseph Royce, B. Abt. 1663, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. 19 Mar 1707/08, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.
  4. Joanna Royce, B. Aft. 1663, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. Abt. 1688, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.
  5. Mary Royce, B. 12 Aug 1675, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.
  6. Esther Royce, B. 15 Oct 1677, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. Aft. 1731.
  7. Lydia Royce, B. 28 May 1680, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. Bet. 1747 – 1751.
  8. Nehemiah Royce, B. 18 Mar 1682/83, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; D. 30 Oct 1725,Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

Sources:

1.  G.B. Roberts & W.A. Reitwiesner.  1984.  American Ancestors and Cousins of The Princess of Wales.  Genealogical Publ. Co., Baltimore, MD, pp. 38, 51.

2.  Gary Boyd Roberts.  1995.  Ancestors of American Presidents.  New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, p. 26.

3.  David Pulsifer.  1852.  Early Records of Boston. New England Historical and Genealogical Register  6(2): 183-184.  On p. 184, under the heading “Roxbury”:

Hanna the daughter of James Morgan borne 18 (5) 1642

Donald Lines Jacobus.  1912.  “Dutch Johnsons in Connecticut.”  New England Historical and Genealogical Register 66(1): 15-19.

 

James Morgan

Abt. 1607-1685

Immigrant Ancestor

Surveyor

One of the First Settlers of Groton, CT

 

James Morgan

Hannah Morgan

Nehemiah Royce

Thomas Royce

Mary (Royce) Roys

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

JAMES B. MORGAN (1 ) was born Abt. 1607 in Llandaff Co., Glamorgan, Wales and died 1685 in Groton, CT. He married Margery Hill August 06, 1640 in Roxbury, MA, daughter of George Hill and Mary Symonds.  He is supposedly decended from royalty; you can follow that line if you wish, using the link at the bottom of his text. He is #887. I have also found under the “Notable Kin.org” site that James Morgan and Margery Hill were Diana, the Princess of Wales’ ancestors.

James Morgan 1607-1685

 

 

MORGAN is derived from the two words, “muir,” the sea, and “gin, i’ begotten ; hence, one born by the sea. In legendary vein, for the story has been handed down by word of mouth for generations, it may be stated that King Arthur, after a defeat in battle with another local potentate, removed his queen for safety to the coast of what is now Glamorganshire, and her child was born there and named Morgan, because he was born by the sea, or on the coast of that country, hence, the place was later on known in honor of the son of King Arthur as Glamorgan, or the country of the man who was born by the sea.
In 1636, in March, James Morgan and two younger brothers, John and Miles, sailed from Bristol on a ship named “Mary” and arrived in Boston in April following. James Morgan settled first in Plymouth, then moved to Roxbury before 1640; lands were granted to him at Pequot in 1650.

John Morgan was a high churchman and disliked the austerity of the Puritans. He moved to Virginia.

Miles Morgan moved to Springfield, MA, and became the progenitor of the Morgan family represented by J. P. Morgan of Morgan and Company, International Bankers.

The eldest brother, and our lineal ancestor, may have settled first at Plymouth. He is found at Roxbury near Boston, before 1640. That year, August 6, 1640, he married there Margery Hill of Roxbury. He was made a freeman there May 10, 1643. He is named as a resident therein the inventory of John Graves, 1646, and was a freeholder there as late as 1650, the same year that he removed to Pequot (now New London) and had a houselot assigned him there.

Early in 1650 he had land granted to him at Pequot which was occupied by him as a homestead “On the path of New Street” (now Ashcraft Street) and a further entry upon the records shows that ” James Morgan hath given him about six acres of upland, where the wigwams were, in the path that goes from his house towards Culvers’ among the rocky hills.” These tracts were located near the present third burial ground, in the western suburbs of the city of New London: a location sterile and dreary and which in a few years was abandoned by its ocupants for homes and broader lands of fairer promise on the east side of the River Thames.

He continued to occupy this homestead on the path to New Street or “Cape Ann Lane” as it was called in honor of the Cape Ann Company who settled there until about March 1657.

On the 25th day of December 1656 he sold his homestead and removed soon after, with several others, across the river on large tracts of land previously granted them by the town, upon the east side, now the south part of Groton.

It was upon the east side of the River Thames that James Morgan settled, and in a rude log cabin with his family consisting of wife and three sons and a daughter; and this territory, made the separate town of Groton May 1705, and again divided by setting off the town of Ledyard in 1836, has been and still remains the prolific hive of our name and family.

He was a large proprietor and dealer in lands; distinguished in public enterprises; often employed by the public in land surveys, establishing highways, determining boundaries, adjusting civil difficulties, as a good neighbor and a Christian man, in whom all appear to have reposed a marked degree of confidence and trust.

He was one of the “townsmen” or selectmen of New London for several years, and was one of the first “Deputies” sent from New London Plantations to the General Court at Hartford, May session 1657 (at which date he deposed his age to be about 50 years) and was nine times afterwards chosen a member of that grave and important assembly, the last time in1670. His associates and compeers composing the General Court or Colonial Assembly in May 1657, when he was first chosen, were Governor John Winthrop, John Mason, Jonathan Brewster, Thomas Welles, etc.

To this carefully selected body of men was intrusted the whole sovereign power of the colony, and the administration of its government, in original jurisprudence and the most trifling as well as most henious offenses and causes of action, and the minutest details in every department.

James Morgan seems to have impressed this grave body of men with a high sense of his sterling honesty and integrity of character, and it appears that in a controversy between the General Court and the New London Plantation about boundaries and jurisdiction, it was ordered that the matter that shoud be submitted to three arbiters, mutually agreed upon, New London at once named their own townsman, James Morgan, really party in their own interest, but nevertheless the General Court as promptly accepted him, and without naming another, agreed to submit to his sole decision, which when made, seems to have satisfied all parties.

He was an active and useful member of the church under Rev. Richard Blinman’s ministry, and his name is prominent in every important movement or proceeding.

James Morgan, Mr. Tinker and Obadiah Brown, are chosen to seat the people in the meeting house, which they doing, the inhabitants are to remain silent.” This was considered a difficult task, as the seating determined the social standing of all the people.

(Minutes from the record.) In 1661 he was one of a committee of the General Court to lay out the bounds of New London “On the east side of the Great River.”

In 1662 he was one of a committee to contract ” for building a house for the ministry” at New London.

From about this time he signs his name “James Morgan, Senior, of New London,” his eldest son, afterwards Capt. James Morgan, being then near twenty-one years of age.

This year, 1662, his list on the the town assessment stands the third highest in amount; and among the tax-payers of that year, about one hundred in number, only seven had a list exceeding 200#. James Morgan’s list was only 250#, but this was a large estate in those primitive days.

The spot where he first built his house in Groton in 1657, and where he ever afterwards resided, and where he died, is a few rods southeast of the present dwelling (1868) of Elijah S. Morgan, about three miles from Groton Ferry, on the road to Poquonoc Bridge and this patriarchal homestead from that day down to the present occupant has descended through an unbroken line of James Morgans, for six generations. And it is worthy of note, in connection with this fact, that for eight generations as they hereinafter succeed each other, in regular order of individual precedence, each one is headed by the name of James Morgan.

He died 1685, aged 78 years and his estate was divided soon after his death among his four surviving children.

Children of James Morgan and Margery Hill are:

 

  1. Hannah Morgan, B. May 18, 1642, Roxbury, Ma; D. December 12, 1706, Wallingford, Connecticut. married, November 20, 1660, Nehemiah Royce
  2. James B. Morgan, Capt., B. March 03, 1643/44, Roxbury, Ma; D. December 08, 1711, Groton, Ct.
  3. Morgan, Capt., B. March 30, 1645, Roxbury, Ma; D. February 12, 1711/12, Preston, Ct.
  4. Joseph Morgan, Lt., B. November 29, 1646, Roxbury, Ma; D. April 05, 1704, Preston, Ct.
  5. Abraham Morgan, B. September 03, 1648, Roxbury, Ma; D. August 1649, Roxbury, Ma.
  6. John Morgan, B. September 03, 1648, Roxbury, Ma; D. August 02, 1650, Roxbury, Ma.
  7. Morgan, B. November 17, 1650, Groton, Conneticut; D. November 24, 1650, Groton, Connecticut.

 

Avery-Morgan Cemetary: The first Avery and Morgan families in America lived in Groton and are buried here, with a marker memorializing the beginning of the family tree in the 1680’s, making the cemetery one of the oldest in Groton. Interesting markers, both old and modern, can be found, such as three early Morgan markers. These simple fieldstones are carved with letters cut straight across, and words cut off in strange places simply because the carver ran out of space on the line. A marker shows the location of the original Morgan house, located to the right of the cemetery entrance. Directions: From Route 117, turn right onto Route 1 South. Turn right into Water Filtration Plant Driveway and follow small green signs which say “Smith Lake Cemetery”

 

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/u/t/Hugh-D-Rutherford/GENE2-0065.html

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:-TwdGJLKM6IJ:www.notablekin.org/gbr/eastwood.htm+%22JAMES+MORGAN%22+and+%22MARGERY+HILL%22&cd=9&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a

 

 

 

Sources:

1.  G.B. Roberts & W.A. Reitwiesner.  1984.  American Ancestors and Cousins of the Princess of Wales.  Genealogical Publ. Co., Baltimore, MD, pp. 29-30.

2.  Lucius R. Paige. 1849.  “List of Freeman.” New England Historical and Genealogical Register.  3(2): 187-194.  On p. 190, citing Colonial Records, Vol. II, p. 27:  “James Morgan” made Freeman of the Massachusetts Colony on 10 May 1643.

3.  David Pulsifer.  1852.  “Early Records of Boston.” New England Historical and Genealogical Register  6(2): 183-184.  On p. 184:

4.  Henry E. Waite.  1884.  “Ten Generations in New England.” New England Historical and Genealogical Register 38(1): 56-57.  On p. 56.1 (large fold-out pedigree chart):  James Morgan, s/o James Morgan and Margery Hill, h/o Mary Vine (with line of descent to Mary Johnson, w/o Otis Waite).

5.  Anon.  1934.  Obituary: Edwin Denison Morgan (1854-1933). New England Historical and Genealogical Register 88(1): 76-77.  On p. 76:

6. Genealogical and family history of southern New York and the Hudson River Valley:  a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation, Volume 3 by Cuyler Reynolds

                 The Moshers

 

One interesting thing I found in searching this line: Alfred Alonzo Kroh and Gladys K Burdick are distant cousins!  They are both descended from Nicholas Mosher.

 

JOSEPH4 MAXSON (MARY3 MOSHER, NICHOLAS2 MOSURE, JOHN MOGER /1 MOSHER) was born 1672, and died September 1750. He married TACY BURDICK Abt. 1691 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island5, daughter of ROBERT BURDICK and RUTH HUBBARD. …and on and on, until you get to Gladys Katherine Burdick.

 

Gladys is from Nicholas’ daughter Mary (whose son Joseph married a Burdick) , and Alfred is from Nicholas’ son Hugh. Even if it were not for that, the descendants of Alfred Kroh carry far more Mosher blood than any other.

 

The following is excerpted from: “Descendants of Hugh Mosher and Rebecca Maxson through Seven Generations” by Mildred (Mosher) Chamberlain and Laura (McGaffey) Clarenbach.

 

English Ancestry: The Moger Family of Somersetshire. In an attempt to find the forebears of the two Hugh Moshers (varient spelling), the first coming to Boston in 1632 and soon settling in Maine, and the Hugh Mosher of this book, whose appearance in Rhode Island in 1660 is announced by a purchase of land, one is confronted by an enormous number of contradictions, of which none is supported by any evidence whatever. Some assumed that they were father and son; at least it would seem that they were close relatives because of the common first name.

 

The contradictory stories began to appear shortly after a notice was placed in the Albany “Advertiser” late in March 1836, and, so it is said, in papers in Washington and Quebec, to the effect that there was in England an unclaimed Mosher estate amounting to “32,000,000 million,” which several days later were said to be in pounds. The first item had said that a search was being made for heirs of Hugh, John, and Daniel Mosher in this country.

 

A scramble ensued. People offered their services as agents, for a sum, about every twenty years for the next century, conventions were held, agents appointed, and final reports issued. Only the agents gained from the “phantom fortune.”

Finally, in 1982, the late Ira K. Haywood and his wife Constance Burgess (Mosher) employed a competent researcher in England to look into the records in Cucklington, Somersetshire, from where Charles Edward Banks said in his Biographical Dictionary of “The English Immigrants to New England 1620-50”, that Hugh Mosier of Cucklington, Sommersetshire, had sailed on the James and lived in Portland, Maine and Newport and Portsmouth, Rhode Island (confusing him with a later Hugh Mosher of this book).

 

The searcher, Mr. M.T. Medleycott, quickly found records in Cucklington and in Wincanton, the nearest town to Cucklington, at this time often called Wincalton (transcripts of records omitted). Mr Medleycott abstracted the wills of Hugh and Margaret Moger, proved in the Perogative Court of Canterbury: Hugh Moger, gentlemen, of Wincanton, 1657 folio 228. It was dated 9 July 1656 and proved 30 June 1657 by Margaret Moger, one of the executors.

The will is quite compatible with the idea that Hugh, Sr., was the father of the Hugh who left England in 1632 and lived in Maine: (1) Hugh, Jr., was baptized in 1609, so 23 years old when Hugh Mosier went to America in 1632. (2) Hugh, Jr., was so far from Wincanton in 1656 that he was given five years to return to claim his land in Stoke Trister. (2) The land in Stoke Trister may have been what, after being passed from one generation to another, became a fortune of “32,000,000 million” in 204 years.

 

When the widow Margaret, her son Hugh, and others, were sued by William Talbot 28 February 1656/7 (Chancery Depositions, Public Records Office, London, C21/T36/5), two of the witnesses to the will said that they knew only Talbot and Margaret Moger among the defendants, presumably because Hugh Moger had been long gone. Hugh’s will suggests also the identity of Hugh Mosher who purchased land from the Indians in Westerly, Rhode Island in 1660 – the subject of this book. (Hugh, Sr.), selected his namesakes for special bequests. There were two: Hugh, son of son John, who had not reached the age of fourteen, so whould have been too young in 1660, and Hugh, son of Hugh, Sr.’s brother Nicholas, presumably considerably older. Mr. Medleycott found no records of Nicholas other than his baptism in 1596 and his mention in the will. He would fit admirably as the father of Hugh of Rhode Island, who gave the name Nicholas to his firstborn. Nicholas and his family probably went to Rhode Island before 1660, for Hugh’s sister Mary married John Maxson of Portsmouth, Rhode Island about 1665, and on 24 October 1677 John Maxson was excused from jury duty because his wife and mother-in-law were both ill (Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island). The mother-in-law was probably the Lydia Mosher who was a member of the Tiverton Baptist Church in 1680 when Hugh was pastor (Arnold, Vital Record of Rhode Island, 8:507).

 

The will is quite compatible with the idea that Hugh, Sr., was the father of the Hugh who left England in 1632 and lived in Main: (1) Hugh, Jr., was baptized in 1609, so 23 years old when Hugh Mosier went to America in 1632. (2) Hugh, Jr., was so far from Wincanton in 1656 that he was given five years to return to claim his land in Stoke Trister. (2) The land in Stoke Trister may have been what, after being passed from one generation to another, became a fortune of “32,000,000 million” in 204 years.

 

Nicholas probably had sons John and Daniel, too, for the notice of the “fortune” in 1836 mentioned descendants of Hugh, John, and Daniel Mosher. Tradition is that Daniel and all his family, and John, single, were massacred by the Indians, leaving descendants of Hugh the only claiments to the “fortune.” Hugh may have been remembering them when he named two later sons Daniel and John.

 

Daniel Mosher

Abt. 1660-1751

Daniel Mosher

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Daniel Mosher (Hugh2,Nicholas1) born Abt. 1660 in Newport, Newport, RI; to Hugh Mosher and Rebecca Maxson. In 1704 he married Mary Elizabeth Edwards (who died aft. September 19, 1751) in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., MA. Daniel died 22 Jul 1751 in Dartmouth, Massachusetts

 

The Will of Daniel Mosher

To wife, best bed, half of household goods, cow, and riding beast, for life of widowhood, and she to be provided for by son George with six bushels Indian corn, one hundred pounds good meat, and five cords firewood yearly. To son George, 10 acres salt marsh, half of land where he lives, and a grind stone. To son Roger, half of certain land. To son Benjamin, 10 acres, he paying my son Hugh, 40s. To sons Constant and Ephraim, the rest of lands given Roger and Benjamin. To son Constant, land where he lives, etc. To son Ephraim, land where he formerly lived, etc. To son Daniel, 40s. paid by son George. To daughter Mary Trofford, an iron pot. To three daughters, the rest of personal at death of wife, viz: to Rachel Herenden, Patience Brownell and Mary Trofford.”

Will proved 19 Sep 1751. Executor,  son George.

 

Children of Daniel Mosher and Mary Edwards are:

 

  1. Benjamin Mosher ; born 19 APR 1706 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, and died AFT 1792. He married Abigail MAXFIELD 12 SEP 1728 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts. She was born 10 AUG 1710, and died BET 10 DEC 1751 AND 14 APR 1753. He married Dorcas SHE[A]RMAN AFT 14 APR 1753 in int, daughter of Joseph SHE[A]RMAN and Elizabeth (UNKNOWN). She was born 16 FEB 1724/25 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, and died 21 SEP 1791 in Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
  2. Daniel; b. July 01, 1709, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts4; d. 1772, Sherman, Fairfield County, Connecticut; m. ANNE JUWITT, April 04, 1748, Sharon, Litchfield County, Connecticut.
  3. Micah Mosher, b. September 27, 1711, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts4; d. Unknown (Prob. Died young)
  4. Constant Mosher; was born 11 SEP 1713 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, and died BEF 03 MAY 1791 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts. He married Sarah SHERMAN 06 OCT 1737 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, daughter of Timothy SHERMAN and Deborah AKIN. She was born 05 MAY 1719 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, and died 1791.
  5. Rachel ; b. June 14, 1715, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts4; d. Unknown; m. (1) UNKNOWN HERENDEN; m. (2) PHILIP CORY, February 19, 1732/33, Tiverton, Newport County, Rhode Island
  6. George Mosher ; 09 MAY 1717 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts. He married Hannah WING 09 AUG 1741 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, daughter of Edward WING and Sarah TUCKER. She was born 13 MAR 1719/20 in Dartmouth (now New Bedford), Bristol, Massachusetts.
  7. Ephraim; b. December 28, 1718, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts4; d. Abt. 1814, Belgrade, Kennebec County, Maine; m. EUNICE RAIMEN, August 16, 1741, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts
  8.  Roger Mosher; b. March 30, 1720, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts4; d. Bef. 1800, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts; m. (1) LYDIA BEDON; m. (2) PHEBE SHERMAN, May 26, 1746, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts.
  9. Hugh; b. March 17, 1721/22, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts4; d. 1789, Poss. Adams, Berkshire County, Massachusetts; m. ELIZABETH BUTTS, December 07, 1740, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts
  10. Patience Mosher was born 29 JUN 1724. She married William BROWNELL (III) 28 MAY 1748 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, son of William BROWNELL (II) and Lydia SOULE. He was born 02 FEB 1714/15 in Little Compton, Bristol (now Newport), Massachusetts (now Rhode Island), and died ABT MAY 1763 in Hoosick, (now Rensselaer), New York
  11. Mary (Mercy) b. October 12, 1726, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts; m. ? Trafford, d. March 27, 1754

 

 

George Mosher

1717-1784

Quaker, Cordwainer

 

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

George Mosher (Daniel3, Hugh2,Nicholas1) was born 09 May 1717 at Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, the son of Daniel Mosher and Mary Edwards. He married Hannah Wing (daughter of Edward Wing and Sarah Tucker) Aug 1741 at Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts. He died and was buried in 1784 in Greenfield, Saratoga, New York.

1700’s Shoemaker’s Tools
“George Mosher, cordwainer (shoemaker), and his wife, Hannah sold their land in Dartmouth, MA. on February 25, 1766 and by 1771 had settled in Dutchess County, New York, Hannah having an account at Merritt’s store in Quaker Hill. Three of their children appeared in Revolutionary War Records in Dutchess County. They may have gone to Saratoga County with their daughter Mary about 1784, for there are undated monuments to George and Hannah Mosher in the St. John Cemetery in Greenfield, where many of Mary’s descendants are buried.”

 

In the hill country, sixty-two miles north of New York,  and twenty-eight miles east of the Hudson River at Fishkill, lies Quaker Hill.

One’s first impressions are of the green of the foliage and herbage. The grass is always fresh, and usually the great heaving fields are mellowed with orange tints and the masses of trees are of a lighter shade of green than elsewhere. The qualities of the soil which have made Quaker Hill “a grass country” for cattle make it a delight to the eye. Well watered always, when other sections may be in drought, its natural advantages take forms of beauty which delight the artist and satisfy the eye of the untrained observer.

The Hill is a conspicuous plateau, very narrow, extending north and south. It is “the place that is all length and no breadth.” Six miles long upon the crest of the height runs the road which is its main thoroughfare, and was in its first century the chief avenue of travel. Crossing it at right angles are four roads, that now carry the wagon and carriage traffic to the valleys on either side; which since railroad days are the termini of all journeys. The elevation above the surrounding hills and valleys is such that one must always climb to attain the hill; and one moves upon its lofty ridge in constant sight of the distant conspicuous heights, the Connecticut uplands east of the Housatonic on one side, and on the other, the Shawangunk and Catskill Mountains, west of the Hudson, all of them more than 25 miles away.

Unsheltered as it is, the locality is subject to severe weather. The extreme of heat observed has been 105 degrees; and of cold—24 degrees.

Quaker Hill possesses natural advantages for agriculture only. No minerals of commercial value are there; although iron ore is found in Pawling and nearby towns. On the confines of the Hill, in Deuell Hollow, a shaft was driven into the hillside for forty feet, by some lonely prospector, and then abandoned; to be later on seized upon and made the traditional location of a gold mine. The Quaker Hill imagination is more fertile and varied than Quaker Hill land. No commercial advantages have ever fallen upon the place, except those resultant from cultivation of the fertile soil in the way of stores, now passed away; and the opportunity to keep summer boarders in the heated season.

The historical interest of the locality dwells in the contrast between the simple annals of Quakerism, which was practiced there in the eighteenth century, and the military traditions which have fallen to the lot of peaceful Quaker Hill. The “Old Meeting House,” known for years officially as Oblong Meeting House, experienced in its past, full of memories of men of peace, the violent seizures by men of war. That storied scene, in the fall of 1778, when the Meeting House was seized for the uses of the army as a hospital, has lived in the thoughts of all who have known the place, and has been cherished by none more reverently than by the children of Quakers, whose peace the soldiers invaded. Both the soldier and the Quaker laid their bones in the dust of the Hill. Both had faith in liberty and equality. The history of Quaker Hill in the eighteenth century is the story of these two schools of idealists, who ignored each other, but were moved by the same passion, obeyed the same spirit. It is said that a locality never loses the impression made upon it by its earliest residents. Certain it is that the roots of modern things are to be traced in that earliest period, and through a continuous self-contained life until the present day.

In the eighteenth century Quaker Hill was the chosen asylum of men of peace. Yet it became the rallying place of periodic outbursts of the fighting spirit of that warlike age; and it was invaded during the great struggle for national independence by the camps of Washington.

There is a dignity common to Washington battling for liberty, and the Quaker pioneers serenely planning seven years before the Revolution for the freedom of the slave. But he was a Revolutionist, they were loyal to King George; he was a man of blood, brilliant in the garb of a warrior, and they were men of peace, dreaming only of the kingdom of God. He was fighting for a definite advance in liberty to be enjoyed at once; they were set on an enfranchisement that involved one hundred years; and a greater war at the end than his revolution. Their records contains no mention of his presence here, though his soldiers seized and fortified the Meeting House. His letters never mention the Quakers, neither their picturesque abode, their dreams of freedom for the slave, nor their Tory loyalty.

The economic activity of the early Quaker Community was varied. All they consumed they had to produce and manufacture. Though the stores sold cane sugar, the farmers made of maple sap in the spring both sugar and syrup, and in the fall they boiled down the juice of sweet apples to a syrup, which served for “sweetness” in the ordinary needs of the kitchen.

Every man was in some degree a farmer, in that each household cultivated the soil. On every farm all wants had to be supplied from local resources, so that mixed farming was the rule. The land which its modern owners think unsuited to anything but grass, because it is such “heavy, clay soil,” was made in the 18th century to bear, in addition to the grass for cattle and sheep, wheat, rye, oats and corn, flax, potatoes, apples. Of whatever the farmer was to use he must produce the raw material from the soil, and the manufacture of it must be within the community.

Children of George Mosher and Hannah Wing are:

 

  1. Samuel Mosher b. 9 Mar 1742, d. 23 Apr 1815 m. married Alice Gidley at Dartmouth, Bristol, MA, on 27 October 1763.
  2. Joanna Mosher b. 9 Apr 1744, d. b 1776
  3. Mary Mosher b. 14 Mar 1748, d. c 31 May 1813 . m. David Mosher
  4. Edward Mosher b. . 23 Jan 1751, d. c 1815
  5. Abraham Mosher b. 14 Dec 1752, d. 28 Feb 1826
  6. Hannah Mosher b.19 Sep 1755, d. a 1793
  7. Ruth Mosher b. 3 Jul 1757

 

Quaker Hill: A SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY BY WARREN H. WILSON, A. M. 1907

Source: http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mira&id=I00604

 

Hugh Mosher/Moger

1632-1713

Reverend, Blacksmith

 

Hugh Mosher

Daniel Mosher

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hugh Mosher (Nicholas1 ) was born on 12 Jun 1632 in Newport, Newport, RI to Nicholas Mosher and Lydia Maxon. He was christened in 1655.  Hugh married Rebecca Maxon in 1655 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA. He died on 3 Nov 1713 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA. He was buried on 7 Dec 1713 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA. Hugh married his first cousin, Rebecca Maxson in 1665 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA.

 

                           Relationship Line:

John Maxon                                         John Maxon

Richard Maxon                                   Lydia Maxon (married Nicholas Mosher)

Rebecca Maxon(married Hugh Mosher)    Hugh Mosher

 

The following is excerpted from: “Descendants of Hugh Mosher and Rebecca Maxson through Seven Generations” by Mildred (Mosher) Chamberlain and Laura (McGaffey) Clarenbach.

 

Hugh first appears in the Rhode Island records on June 29, 1660 when he and five others of Newport, bought certain land at Misquamicut (Westerly), of the Indian sachem Socho, which had been given the latter by Canonicus and Miantonomi, for driving off the Pequots in 1637. Hugh probably lived for a time in Westerly, but in 1664 he was admitted freeman of Portsmouth. Town records show him there as early as 1668, and in 1670, 1673, 1676 and 1677.

 

Evidence is convincing that he was a son of Nicholas, (son of Hugh Moger of Cucklington and Wincanton, Somersetshire, England). He had a sister Mary, who married his wife’s brother John Maxson, according to many genealogists, none of whom cites the proof. It that is correct, Hugh’s mother (Lydia Maxon) was living with the Maxsons on 24 Oct. 1677, when John Maxson was excused from jury duty because both his wife and his mother-in-law were ill. The mother-in-law in this instance had to be his wife’s mother, rather than his stepmother because he had a stepfather John Harndell. This mother-in-law may have been the Lydia Mosher whose name precedes Rebecca Mosher (wife of Hugh, Rebecca Maxson) in the membership list of the Tiverton Baptist Church in 1680 for no other Lydia Mosher appears in the family until about 1695.

 

In 1665, Hugh married  Rebecca Maxson, daughter of Richard Maxon and Rebecca Marbury. Rebecca was born in Dartmouth, Massachusetts and died between December 29, 1707 and February 25, 1707/8. Hugh married secondly, Sarah Butcher, widow of Rev. John Harding. There were no children by this marriage.

 

In 1684 at Dartmouth, Hugh was ordained as pastor of the First Baptist Church at its organization. This church soon embraced people living in Dartmouth, and the Rhode Island communities of Tiverton and Little Compton.

 

A Portsmouth court record of July 8, 1668 indicates that Hugh, having purchased of Thomas Lawton part of his farm near Hunting Swamp, obliges himself and heirs to maintain a good fence in the line between himself and Thomas Lawton.  Hugh probably lived for a time in Westerly, but in 1669 he was admitted freeman of Portsmouth. Town records show him there as early as 668, and 1670, 1673, 1676, and 1677. In 1680 he was pastor of the Tiverton Baptist Chruch which served Tiverton and Little Compton RI and Dartmouth MA. John Harndell’s will placed him in Portsmouth in 1685.

 

Before 16 April 1690 he had moved to Dartmouth, for on that day John Walley of Bristol Co. wrote to Thomas Hinckley, governor of Plymouth Colony, “He is a substantial man … whatsoever Mosier doth, he doth publicly, and makes account he can in law answer anything he hath said or done.” Deeds show him a resident of Dartmouth as late as 1708, one in 1707 giving his occupation as blacksmith. A deed of Dartmouth land on 1 March 1709 gives Newport as his residence. On August 24, 1676 he was a member of the Court Martial, held at Newport for the trial of certain Indians charges with being engaged in King Phillip’s designs. Several of them were sentenced to be executed. In 1680 Hugh was taxed £1, 4s., 1d. On November 7, 1691 he sold to Joseph Braman for 36s. “half my share belonging to purchasers of Westquadnoid. (The deed was witnessed by Rebecca Mosher and John Mosher.)

 

We find the following record:

Hugh Mosher of portsmouth … Black Smith … for … two hundred and thirty pounds in money … payd by henry Brighman of portsmouth … have given … Land … in the township of portsmouth … And part in newport bounds … thirty Eight Acres … bounded northward by Land of John Vahan Eastwardly partly by … Land of Daniell Lawton, Called hunting Swamps & … by the Common Southwardly partly by the Common & partly by Land of witherington, westwarly by the Common … with all the dwelling houses Barnes Orchards … I … Hugh mosher … granted unto him … Rebeckah Mosher the wife of mee … Consent … twenty eight Day of January … One thousand six hundred Eighty nine.

 

Hugh made his will at Dartmouth on October 12, 1709, and it was proved in Bristol Co. Massachusetts on December 7, 1713. The executors were his son James and friend Daniel Sabeere of Newport, Overseers, friend and kinsman, Jeremiah Clarke, and Captain John Stanton, of Newport.

 

Will of Hugh Mosher

 To son James, all land in Newport, with house, etc., there, and house and land in Dartmouth, and land in Squamicut (Westerly), Westquadnoid, etc. To grandson Hugh, son of Nicholas, 100 acres and to other grandsons of surname Mosher, 50 acres each. To wife, Sarah, all movables I had with her at marriage. To son James, ret of land. To each grandchild not of my name, 10s. To sons John, Nicholas, Joseph and Daniel, 12d. each. To each daughter, 10s. or 20s., as estate holds out. (He calls himself of Newport, at the time of making his will, but before his death had removed to Dartmouth.) His inventory totaled £290, 17s., 2d., and included purse and wearing apparel, bonds, bible and other books, dwelling-house and land, horse, 2 cows, 3 swine, carpenter’s tools, pewter, silver plate, warming pan, estate brought him by wife, etc. His widow Sarah died in June 1716 at Newport, Rhode Island.
Children of Hugh Mosher and Rebecca Maxson are:

 

  1. Daniel Mosher, born Abt. 1660 born in 1678 in Newport, Newport, RI.; died Bet. July 22 – September 19, 1751 in Dartmouth, Massachusetts; married Mary Elizabeth Edwards.
  2. Hannah Mosher, was born on 9 Nov 1673 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA. She died after 23 Jan 1716/1717 in Newport, Newport, RI married Steven Cornell
  3. Ann Mosher, died Aft. 1721; married Peter Lee Bef. January 30, 1692/93
  4. Nicholas Mosher, (Captain) born 1666; died 1747; married Elizabeth Autley; died Unknown.
  5. John Mosher, b. in 1668 in Newport, Newport, RI. He died on 1 Aug 1739 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA
  6. Joseph Mosher, died Unknown.
  7. Mary Mosher, died Unknown; married Joseph Rathburn May 19, 1691; died Unknown.
  8. Rebecca Mosher, born in 1677 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA. She died after 28 Apr 1746 in Tiverton, Newport, RI. married John Kirby;
  9. James Mosher

 

Nicholas Mosure

1596-

Immigrant Ancestor

Nicholas Mosher

Hugh Mosher

Daniel Mosher

George Mosher

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Nicholas (1 )was baptized at Cucklington, Somerset, England on December 19, 1596. He was the son of John Mosure and Edith Crosse*.  Nicholas was married to Lydia Maxson. Nicholas and his family probably went to Rhode Island before 1660. The death date and place for Nicholas is not known, while Lydia died sometime after 1680. (They were also the ancestors of Gladys K Burick, Alfred through Hugh, and Gladys through Mary.)
Children of Nicholas Mosure and Lydia Maxson are:

 

  1. Hugh Mosher, B. Bef. 1633; D. Bef. December 07, 1713, Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island.
  2. Mary Mosher, B. 1641; D. February 02, 1717/18. (Ancestress of Gladys Burdick)
  3. John Mosher, D. 1656.
  4. Daniel Mosher, D. 1656.Ruth Mosher

 

*Another source says he is a son of Hugh Moger and Margaret of Cucklington and Wincanton, Somersetshire, England. That may be so, but I find many more sources that say it was John and Edith.

 

Ruth Mosher

1770- 1847

Mother of Nine

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Ruth (Samuel5, George4 , Daniel3, Hugh2,Nicholas1) was born in 1770. She was the daughter of Samuel Mosher and Alice Gidley. She married Benjamin Shepard circa 1789. She married before 28 Mar 1815, Justus Chase*.  Ruth died at Providence, Saratoga, NY, on 18 March 1847 at age 77 years. Burial: Hagadorns Mills Cemetery (Providence) Saratoga County, New York

 

1790’s fashion seen at left.

Woodard Cemetery, Providence – 63 stones. 200 yards north of Union Mills Road, and 100 yards west of Fishhouse Road (County Rte. 14) behind the former Mary Small home. In the area of the one-time Woodard hotel and West Providence Post Office.  It is far back in the woods, across a stream. Cemetery record states: Chase, Ruth Wife of Justis Chase (b. 1770 d. 31 Mar 1839 ), Relick (widow) of Benj. Shepard.

Children of Ruth Mosher and Benjamin Shepard

 

  1. Hannah Shepard b. bt 1789 – 1790
  2. Samuel Shepard b. b 1794
  3. Ruth Shepard+ b. c 1797, d. 1856
  4. John Shepard b. c 1797
  5. Jane Shepard b. b 1800
  6. Benjamin Shepard b. c 1802
  7. Alice Shepard b. c 1805
  8. Israel Shepard b. 7 Mar 1807
  9. Joseph Shepard b. c 1812

 

*Justice Chase was the widower of her sister Alice, and the son of Nathan Chase.

 

Another source: Daugher of Samuel Mosher and Alice Gidley, Ruth Mosher was born 18 May 1847.  She married. (#1) Benjamin Shephard, who died 27 Apr 1813 at 45 years of age. She then married (#2) JUSTUS CHASE, who died. 31 Mar 1839.

http://greenerpasture.com/Ancestors/Details/2193

 

Samuel Mosher

1742-1815

Farmer

 

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Samuel (George4 , Daniel3, Hugh2,Nicholas1)  was born at Dartmouth, Bristol, MA, on 9 March 1742. He was the son of George Mosher and Hannah Wing. He married Alice Gidley at Dartmouth, Bristol, MA, on 27 October 1763. He died at Providence, Saratoga, NY, on 23 April 1815. His body was interred at Providence Saratoga County New York at Woodward Cemetery.

He or his son could have been the Samuel Mosher who was the Quaker in May 1794. Worked on road district #14 in 1797 with his son Samuel Jr.

Among the early settlers in the southeastern part of the town (Providence/ Hagadorn Mills NY) were Othniel Allen, Ichabod Ely, Zalmon Pulling, Henry R. Hagedorn, James and Jacob Conkling, David and Ephraim Root, William Beardsley, Gideon Allen, and Uriah Cornell. Jonathan Ferris, William Richardson, Peleg Hart, Shadrach Wait, Robert Ryan, —— Jones, Stephen Wait, Samuel Mosher, Judah Chase, Edmund Wait, Joshua Boreman, Jonathan Westgate, Jabez Manchester, Wing Chase, James Haviland, and John Rosevelt were other early settlers in different parts of the town.

Samuel was living in Charlotte, Dutchess Co., NY in 1775 when he refused to sign the Association Pact. Deeds placed hi m in Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., NY 1784-86. As a resident o f Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., 1790-95, he made purchases in Montgomery Co. Early in 1796 he moved to Providence, NY.

The history of Saratoga County, NY lists Samuel as one of the early settlers in the southeastern part of town.

One website (the same that listed his will says, “Samuel served as a Pvt. in the Revolutionary War, was in the Militia (Land Bounty Rights) of Dutchess Co., 6th Regimen t, NY. (Note: Descendants of Samuel Mosher are eligible to join D.A.R.)”. However, I can find no documentation of this. I did see where he refused to sign the Association Pact, which seems to be an agreement to fight the British. Perhaps he fought in the war…but for the wrong side?  If he was a Quaker, it would not be surprising if he did not fight for either side. When the Revolutionary war broke out, the Quakers were beaten because they wouldn’t take sides. They did help raise relief funds to help the wounded from the war. During the war, certain Quakers who would not sign ‘writs of assistance’ (ie. allegiance) to the revolutionary cause faced punishments such as confiscation of property and exile. I find records that his wife Alice and daughter Abigail were Quakeresses, but no record of Samuel’s church affiliation. It is a common misunderstanding that folks eligible for DAR membership needed to descend from a soldier, or one who actually took up arms and fought. This is not correct. The ‘CS’ stands for Civil Service and denotes that … furthered the efforts of the new government by helping in a civil capacity [also sometimes denoted as “patriotic service.”] He could have held a civil office in the area, or just a member of a committee, or, (my personal favorite is a ‘fence watcher’) which is designated among the recognized efforts, or, he could have just paid taxes to the new government or carried water to troops passing over his lands. A common practice was for a Quaker to pay another person to serve in the army in his stead – the church considered this to be liable as well, as well as paying a fine for refusing to serve.

Samuel’s will dated 28 March 1815, is useful in sorting out his children and grandchildren. The heirs were: wife Alice; son Samuel; daughters Elizabeth Chase, Abigail Chase, Ruth Chase, (then Shephard), and Esther Haviland; grandchildren Samuel, John, Benjamin, Israel, Joseph, Hannah, Ruth, Jane and Alice Shephard; George, Justice, Daniel, Walter, Stephen, Esther, Annis, Rosannah, Abigail and Elizabeth Chase; and great grandchildren Sallyann and Shephard Wait.”

Samuel Mosher’s Will

“In the name of God Amen. I Samuel Mosher of Providence County of Saratoga & state of New York considering the uncertainty and frailty of this mortal life and being of sound and perfect mind and memory and blessed by Almighty God for the same do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following that is to say first I give and bequeath to my wife Alce Mosher the full and [certain?] use of the equal third part of all my real estate for her sole and proper use during and to the end of natural life together with all the hereditament s and apportaments thereunto belonging or appurtaining and I do further bequeath to my wife one Cow and two sheep and all the household furniture and to do with the same as to her it may seem proper and I do give and bequeath to my only son, Samuel Mosher Junr. te half part meaning all my right and title to alot of land situate in Providence being a part of Lot No five of the smaller lot in Kayderosses and containing seven acres and a quarter and deeded by Stephen Wait and Lucy Wait to Samuel Moshe and Samnuel Mosher Junr. and further I do bequeath to my said son all my land laying on the west side of the road as it now runs from Hagadorns Mills to the fish house being in lot No one hunred and fortyseven and one hundred and fifty three saving and excepting out of the same one half acre of ground for a burying place where some persons are now buried the south line of the same to be on the creek and so far west as to include disbrows graves and with a passage into the same for the purpose of burying; said half acre of ground being for the use of Samuel Mosher Junr., Elizabeth Chase, Abigail Chase, Ruth Shephard, Justice Chase, Esth Haviland, the same hoping that it may be preserved in decency and good order and I do further bequeath and give to my son samuel all my right to Lot No one hundred fortyseven being on the east side of said road and furter I give the sid Samuel my wareing aparel and also all my farming utensils of every description and all my stock or cattle of any kind and also all my obligations for money or accounts for money and money saving out of the same a payment of all Just demands against me and of my funeral charges. I do further give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Chase two hundred and eighty dollars. I do further give and bequeath unto my daughter Abigail Chase two hundred and eighty dollars. I do further give and bequeath unto my daughter Ruth Chase [?five dollard?].

I do further give and bequeath unto my Grandchildren namely Samuel, John, Benjamin, Israel, and Joseph Shephard forty dollars each also Hannah, Ruth, Jane and Alce Shephard sixteen dollars each and to my great grand children namely Sallyann and Shephard Wait eight dollars each. I do further gve and bequeath unto mygrandchildren namely George, Justice, David, Walter, Stephen Chase forty dollars each. I do further give and bequeath unto my daughter Esther Haviland five dollars and [?thease sevral somes?] payable four years after my decease the interest to be paid annually from the time of my decease. I do hereby further constitute and appoint Samuel Mosher Junr. and Wing Chase my true and only Executors of this my last will and testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made in witness hereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal the twentyeighth day of the third month in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen.

Samuel Mosher (L.S.) signed sealed published and declared by the above named Samuel Mosher to be his last will and testament in the presence of us who have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses in the presence of the testator Jabex Manchester, John Haviland, Charles Eddy.Saratogass. Be it remembers that on the twentyninth day o f August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred fifteen personally appeared before me, thomas Palmer Esquire, Surrogate of the County of Saratoga, Jabez Manchester and John Haviland subscribing witnesses to the above written will the said Jabez and John being duly affirmed, declared that they saw Samuel Mosher sign and seal the above testament in writing purporting to the the last will and testament of him the said Samuel Mosher and that they heard him publish and declare the same as and for his last will and testament and that at the time thereof he the said Samuel Mosher was of sound mind memory and understanding to the best of their knowledge and belief and that the names subscribed to the said Will is of their own proper handwriting and that they saw Charles Eddy the other subscribing witness subscribe his name as witness thereto in the presence of the testator.”

 

Woodward Cemetery Records:

Mosher Samuel Sr. b. 1742 d. 1815/01/23 Age: 73y 01m 03d

Children of Samuel Mosher and Alice Gidley:

 

  1. Elizabeth Mosher b. 2 Nov 1766, d. 23 Sep 1848
  2. Abigail Mosher b. 5 May 1768, d. 10 Oct 1848
  3. Ruth Mosher b. 1770, d. 18 Mar 1847
  4. Alice Mosher b. 17 Mar 1772, d. 13 Oct 1812
  5. Samuel Mosher Jr. b. 10 Aug 1774, d. 16 Apr 1854
  6. Esther Mosher b. 28 Sep 1775, d. 10 Jan 1840

 

Sources:

  1. Abbrev: Debra Townsend
    Title: “A Pilgrimage Into MY Past,” supplied by Towsend.
    Author: compiled by Debra Towsend

MOSHER, Samuel Nr Hagedorn Mills Providence Twp, Saratoga Co NY 65 Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Vol.3, p. -Serial: 12718; Volume: 3. According to this info Samuel was a Revolutionary War Patriot.

 

 

Adam Mott

1596-1661

Immigrant Ancestor

Tailor

Adam Mott

Jacob Mott

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Adam Mott (John1) was born to John Mott and Unknown 12 Aug 1596 in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England. He married Elizabeth Creel (b. Abt 1600 England, d. Aft 1629 Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England) 28 Oct 1616 in Saffran Walden, Essex, England). He married Sarah Lees  11 May 1635 Horseheath, , Cambridge, England. Adam died 12 Aug 1661 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.

 

Adam came to America in ship “Defence” in 2 July1635 and settled in Roxbury as freeman 25 May 1636. He  moved to Hingham where he had a grant of land , and went in 1638 to Rhode Island, Island of Aquidneck where he had a grant of land on the west side of the spring in 6 Sept 1638. He and others laid out land at Portsmouth 12 Jan 1640 and he had a grant there 23 June 1638. He is listed as a freeman 16 Mar 1641, at Portsmouth RI and as freeman 1655. Adam was a tailor of Higham. Adam’s will was dated 2 April, and proved 31 Aug 1661.

 

Children of Adam Mott and Elizabeth Creel are:

  1. John Mott b. 6 Sep 1618 Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England
  2. Adam Mott b. 1623 Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England d. 1673 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  3. Jonathon Mott b. 1626 Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England d. Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  4. Elizabeth Mott b. 1629 Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England

 

Children of Adam Mott and Sarah Lees are:

 

  1. Jacob Mott b. 1633 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA d. 15 Nov 1711 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  2. Eleazer Mott b. Abt 1635 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA Gender: Female
  3. Elazer Mott b. 1635 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA Gender: Male
  4. Gershom Mott  b. 1637 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA d. 9 Mar 1698 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA

 

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rcjack/f_1b.html#6

 

Hannah Mott
1663- 1730

Quakeress

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Hannah (Jacob3,Adam2, John1) was born in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, in November 1663 to Jacob Mott and Joanna Slocum. She married Abraham Tucker at Dartmouth, Bristol, PC, on 26 November 1690. Hannah Mott died in November 1730 at Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.

 

 

 

Quaker Fashion at the left.

“Abraham’s wife Hannah died in Dartmouth on February 1, 1731. She died intestate.”

ABSTRACT

Appointment of Abraham Tucker of Dartmouth, Yeoman, to be Adm. Of Estate of his mother Hannah Tucker of Dartmouth widow dcd intest., dtd 20 Nov 1739. [1731?]  [9:298]

 

 

 

Children of Hannah Mott and Abraham Tucker are:

 

  1. Sarah Tucker b. 23 Apr 1693, d. 2 Aug 1727 m. Edward Wing
  2. Content Tucker b. 12 Mar 1695, d. bt 1734 – 1738
  3.  Joanna Tucker (Barker) b. 14 Oct 1699
  4. Ruth Tucker b. 16 Jan 1703
  5. Hannah Tucker b. 22 Apr 1704

 

Representative men and old families of southeastern Massachusetts …, Volume 3

By J.H. Beers & Co

A short history of the Slocums, Slocumbs and Slocombs of America …

By Charles Elihu Slocum

Jacob Mott

1633-1711

Immigrant Ancestor

Quaker Preacher

Jacob Mott

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Jacob Mott (Adam2, John1)   was born 1633 in England to Adam Mott and Sarah Lees. He married Joanna Slocum about 1660 in Newport, RI. Jacob died 15 Nov 1711 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA

 

Jacob Mott Jacob and his wife Joanna were residents of Portsmouth, R.I. Mr. Mott was deputy in 1674, and constable in 1687. He was one of a number who built, in 1699, the first house of worship erected for that purpose in the town of Dartmouth. He was a Quaker preacher.

The Quakers were members of a faith called the Society of Friends. Their religious beliefs were very different from the Anglicans, Pilgrims, and Puritans. Their faith was centered on a “God of Love and Light.” They believed that each person was capable of being saved by “the inner light.” For them, this light was represented in Jesus.

The Quakers didn’t believe in the authority of clergy. They also didn’t believe that God should be worshiped in churches. Instead, they created an organization based on the equality of individuals. They held meetings in meeting houses rather than religious services in churches.

The Quakers believed that war was wrong. They refused to support a military, unlike many other colonists. Also, they were one of the first American colonial groups to condemn slavery. They believed in the natural equality of all people under God.

Like the Puritans, the Quakers had suffered from persecution because of their faith, in both England and America. The ruling Anglicans in England imprisoned Quakers because they didn’t believe in paying taxes. In Virginia, they banished them. The Puritans of Massachusetts banished Quakers, and, in some cases, burned them as witches.

The Quakers themselves developed a different approach to those who didn’t share their beliefs. In their own colony in the New World, they promoted religious freedom. People in Quaker settlements were allowed to worship according to their own Christian beliefs. However, Quakers didn’t allow people who did not believe in God to settle in their colonies.

Children of Joanna Slocum and Jacob Mott are:

 

  1. Jacob Mott b. 13 Dec 1661 Of, Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA d. 1737
  2. Hannah Mott b. Nov 1663 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  3. d. Nov 1730 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  4. Mercy Mott b. 8 Jan 1666 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  5. Sarah Mott b. 3 Feb 1670 Tiverton, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA d. 1738
  6. Elizabeth Mott b. 12 Sep 1672 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA d. 22 Mar 1749
  7. Greshom Mott b. 1680 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
  8. Samuel Mott b. 4 Sep 1678 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA

 

J.H. Beers & Co.,Representative Men and Old Families of Rhode Island, Illustrated, Volume III, Chicago 1908. On Microfilm, Catalogue No. LIB-7-102284. Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City Utah.

 

John Mott

Immigrant Ancestor

-Prob. 1656

John Mott

Adam Mott

Jacob Mott

Hannah Mott

Sarah Tucker

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John Mott (1)was admitted Portsmouth 1638 or 1639 when he likely followed his son Adam Mott from England. Order for money for care issued to Mr. Baulstone 29 Aug 1644 , town of Portsmouth voted 13 Nov 1654 “to pay John Mott’s passage to Barbados and back again if he cannot be received.” John  provided for support 3 July 1656 , probably died not long after.

 

Barbados was a common port of entry into America during that time.

 

Possibly related to John MOTT from Saffron Walden (England) records:

Buried 2 Jan 1610/11, …. Elizabeth, wife of John

Buried 2 Jan 1616/7, ……. Ann MOTT, dau of John MOTT

Buried 4 May 1619, …. Catherine, wife of John Mott

Baptized 29 Sept 1625 …. Elizabeth MOTT, dau of John and Elizabeth MOTT .

 

Children of John Mott and Unknown are:

 

Adam Mott b. 12 Aug 1596 in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England. He married Elizabeth Creel (b. Abt 1600 England, d. Aft 1629 Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England) 28 Oct 1616 in Saffran Walden, Essex, England). m. Sarah Lees  11 May 1635 Horseheath, Cambridge, England. d 12 Aug 1661 Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.

 

 

 

Hanna Moulthrop

1665-1712

Hanna Moulthrop

William B. Russell

Nicholas Russell

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Hanna Moulthrop was born 10 Apr 1665 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, daughter of Matthew Moulthrop and Hannah Thompson . She married John Russell on 17 Aug 1687 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. She died on 19 Jan 1712 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut

 

Children of John Russell and Hanna Moulthrop are:

 

  1. Hannah Russell, b. Abt. 1674
  2. Lydia Russell
  3. John Russell, Jr.
  4. Abigail Russell
  5. William B. Russell was born 1680/83 (1676?) in New Haven, CT, and died 1739 in New Haven, CT. He married Martha Sperry Mar 11, 1706/07 in Sperry Farms, West Rock, New Haven, CT
  6. Rachel
  7. Edward Russell, b. Abt. 1678
  8. Joseph Russell
  9. Mabel Russell
  10. Sarah Russell

 

Matthew Moulthrop

1608-1668

Immigrant Ancestor

Fought the Indian Wars

 

Matthew Moulthrop

Matthew Moulthrop

Hanna Moulthrop

William B. Russell

Nicholas Russell

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Matthew Moulthrop was born in England 6 Mar 1608, Bridlington, Lincolnshire, England to John Mowthrop and Elizabeth Hardie. He married Jane Nicholl 13 May 1633, in Wrawby, Lincolnshire, England.  Matthew died December 22, 1668 in New Haven CT. Legend has it that the name Moulthrop has an English appearance but long before Matthew immigrated in the 1600’s his people resided in an area called Moltrup, Denmark.

 

Matthew immigrated with the Rev. John Davenport on the HECTOR at Boston on 26 June 1637.

Mathew Moulthrop, settled at Quinnipiac, now New Haven, Connecticut, April 18, 1638, and was one of the original signers of the Plantation Covenant, ratified June 4, 1639. East Haven was originally a part of New Haven. In June, 1639, the free planters of Quinnipiac convened in Mr. Newman’s barn and formed their constitution of government. Among the subscribers to that instrument who settled in East Haven, or were concerned in that settlement, were … Matthew Moulthrop.”

Mathew was listed 63rd on the list of New Haven freemen and 66th on the list of signers of the fundamental agreement for New Haven.

He was admitted to First Church, New Haven, before 1644.

Land:

In 1648, in New Haven he received 3.5 acres of upland on the west side from John Moss and 1.5 acres of meadow and 1 acre of west meadow from Richard Beech.  The court held February 6, 1648/49 accordingly noted that: “Richard Beech passeth ouer to Mathew Moulthrop one acr & a half of meddow lying, 1 acr of it in ye west meddow on this sid ye river, fronts vpon Mr. Lambertons vpland, ye reare to ye river, a highway through ye meddow to ye north, Mathew Molthrop on ye south, 1/2 acr in Sollatary Cove not laid out.”     Hoadly, Records of the Colony and Plantation of New Haven, 1638-1649, pp. 430-431.

Matthew inventoried an estate in 1662/63: Inventory of ye Estate of William Ludington, who immigrated with him.

 

That estate was inventoried and appraised by John Cooper and Matthew Moulthrop, and their inventory, according to Hoadlys New Haven Colonial Records was filed in court at New Haven on March 3, 1662, according to the chronology of that time, or 1663 according to ours.

 

Matthew was prominent in the affairs of the New Haven and East Haven Colonies, in both of which he held office; he fought in the Indian Wars

 

Occupation: farmer and/or glover.; Wills of both Matthew and his wife Jane are found in Volume I of the New Haven Probate Records. His will was probated 10th June 1691, and recorded in Volume II of the New Haven records.  Allen Bull and Isaac Bradley were the appraisers. –Colonial Families of the United States, Volume VII, Rhoades Family, Page 410

Children of Matthew Moulthrop and Jane Nicholl are:

 

  1. Elizabeth Moulthroup, born abt. 1638 in Plymouth Colony, MA or New Haven CT; baptized in 1642 died 09 Oct 1689 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT or after 1669.; m. John Gregory, 18 Oct 1663MA Occupation: housewife
  2. Matthew Moulthrop, born 1639; died 01 Feb 1690/91 in East Haven; married Hannah Thompson 26 Jun 1662 in East Haven, CT
  3. Mary Moulthrop, born 1641 in New Haven, New Haven Co.,CT. baptized in 1642, Died, after 1669

 

MOULTHROP, or MOULTROP

Most information is from Patricia Law Hatcher’s articles in “The American Genealogist”58 Page 222

  Note:

From Directory of the Ancestral Heads of New England Families, 1620-1700by Frank R. Holmes
“MOULTHROP, MOULTROP, Matthew, resident of New Haven, Conn. 1639”
———–
From: Ancestry of Franklin Perkins athttp://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~scperkins/hperkanc.html

REFERENCES:–Am. Ancestry, VIII, 10; Dodd’s History of East Haven, Ct., 137-9; Sharp’s Hist. of Seymour, Ct. 224-6.

 

Matthew was profiled in The American Geneologist Magazine.

 

Matthew Moulthrop

1633/34- 1690/91

Immigrant Ancestor

Matthew Moulthrop

Hanna Moulthrop

William B. Russell

Nicholas Russell

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Matthew Moulthrop was christened24 Feb 1633/1634 in Wrawby, Lincolnshire, England. Matthew married Hannah Thompson on 26 Jun 1662 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. He died 1 Feb 1690/1691 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

Matthew Moulthrop:
According to the Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, Vol. 2 (May 1665 – Nov. 1677), Mathew Moulthrop is listed as a New Haven freeman in October, ’69.

 

Children of Hannah Thompson and Matthew Moulthrop  are:

 

  1. Hannah Moulthrop, born 02 Nov 1663
  2. 2.        Hannah Moulthrop, born born 10 Apr 1665 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut m. John Russell on 17 Aug 1687 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. D. 19 Jan 1712 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
  3. 3.        John Moulthrop, born 05 Feb 1667/68; died 14 Feb 1712/13; married Abigail Bradley; born 09 Sep 1671; died 03 Sep 1743
  4. 4.        Matthew Moulthrop, born 18 Jul 1670
  5. 5.        Abigail Moulthrop, born 18 Jul 1670
  6. 6.        Lydia Moulthrop, born 08 Aug 1674
  7. 7.        Samuel Moulthrop, born 24 Jun 1677
  8. 8.        Samuel Moulthrop, born 13 Apr 1679
  9. 9.        Keziah Moulthrop, born 16 Apr 1682 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 31 Dec 1767 in Branford, New Haven, CT; married Lt. Daniel Barker 24 Aug 1701 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.

The Munsons

 

Elizabeth Munson

1695- 1765

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Elizabeth Munson (John3, Samuel2, Thomas1)    was born on 15 May 1695 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut to John Munson and Sarah Cooper. Elizabeth married (1) Seth Perkins on 28 Feb 1716 in New Haven. He was deceased by June 30, 1730, when his father made a deed of gift to his “grandchildren Amy and Eleanor Perkins, children of his son Seth.”.  Elizabeth married (2) Nicholas Russell on 7 Jun 1733 in New Haven, Connecticut.  She died 1765, Cheshire, Wallingford, CT at age 70.

 

The new slang words when Elizabeth was young were:

 

From A to Z

To blab about something

To smell a rat

Ain’t

I can’t make head or tail of it

To pick and choose

To read someone the riot act

Make one’s mouth water

 

1715 American Fashion

Elizabeth is mentioned on page 61 (#824) of the Historical Catalog of the First Church of Christ in New Haven.

 

Children of Seth Perkins and Elizabeth Munson are:

 

  1. Thomas Perkins, born May 20, 1717; died , 1758.
  2. AmyPerkins, born Sept. 3, 1726.
  3. Eleanor Perkins

 

Child of Nicholas Russell and Elizabeth Munson is:

 

  1. Nicholas Russell, Jr, b. May 20, 1734, New Haven, CT; d. Mar 23, 1798, Cheshire, Wallingford Co., New Haven, CT.

Her birth is listed on page 169 of the Munson book.

http://www.archive.org/details/historicalcatal00dextgoog

John Munson

1672-Bef.1752

Deacon, Captain

Miller, Surveyor

John Munson

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John Munson (Samuel2, Thomas1)was born on 28 Jan 1672 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, the son of Samuel Munson and Martha Bradley. John Munson and Sarah Cooper were married on 10 Nov 1692 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. He married Elizabeth (Unknown) about 1736; He died before 1752.

 

John appeared in the census in Mar 1704 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. The 1704 census was a drawing made for lots in the “half division” of New Haven lands, recorded in the volume of the Proprietor’s records. The list gives the number of persons in the family of each proprietor and is equivalent to a census. Lt. John had 6 people in his household in 1704.

 

John served in the military in the Pequot War, and made the rank of Lieutenant. He is later referred to as “Captain”, but I do not know when he achieved that rank.

” Harteford. Generall Cort, Tuesday Nov: 14th, 1637. . . It is ordered that every common souldier that went in the late designe against or enemies the Pequoites shall have is. 7,d. pr day for theire service at sixe dayes to the weeke ; . . . and that the saide payment shalbe for a moneth although in strictnes there was but three weekes and 3 dayes due. … It is ordered that the pay in the second designe [the pursuit of the fugitives to Fairfield swamp] shalbe the same with the former, and the tyme a month.”

John Munson  is endlessly cited in, “1637-1887. The Munson record: A genealogical and biographical account of Captain Thomas Munson (a pioneer of Hartford and New Haven) and his descendants, Volume 1” by Myron Andrews Munson. You can see it here: http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA132&lpg=PA132&dq=%22New%20Haven%22%20%22John%20Munson%22%20miller&sig=RWz_v50XunuwkHxjJwSLTRJf0p0&ei=372cTNCeF5KjnQeGqti5DQ&ct=result&id=k0w6AAAAMAAJ&ots=aTSiFX-KQ6&output=text

 

Here are a few examples:

 Feb. 20.—Abraham Bradley, Miller, (by exchange) conveys J. M. about J acre “near my Corn Mill”: J. M., Malster, conveys to A. B. about £ A., being sequestred land and lying near srt Bradley’s Mill. April 29.—” Capt John Munson moved to the Town that the would pleas to Exchange a small piece of land with him near his Mill.” Matter referred to Townsmen, to report.

Town Meeting, Dec. 22.—” Cap’ John Munson Chosen Moderator for the year ensuing.” For ten years, 1718-1727, Capt. John was annually elected Moderator for all the townmeetings of the year, an extraordinary tribute to his qualification for presiding officer.

Dec. 28.—Capt J. M. “proposed that the Town would grant him a small piece of land on the west side of his westermost Pond. Nothing done in it, at present.”

Lands . . Did Grant unto Capt John Munson and others two acres of Land upon the West Riuer aboue Sperrys farme, where now the said Munson and others have erected a saw Mill, and since said Grant, the sd Munson hath complyed with the Committee by the said proprietors appointed, for the Land North of sd Mill and East of sd two acres, and the said owners or prop- of said mill have thought proper to make the Dam aboue ye Right to them granted, and therefore have Run a Ditch or trench from the place where the Dam is made to the place where the mill is erected,—which trench Runs through the Land by sd Committee allowed to said Munson, his heirs or assigns, to the prejudice of the owners or proprietors of said mill”: J. M. accordingly engages that liberty of maintaining such a race shall be perpetuated, deeding such right to Ebenezer Sperry, Ebenezer Peck, Joseph Ruggles and Nathaniell Sperry.

Dec. 19.—Capt. John’ chosen Moderator for the year.

Dec. 13.—Capt John* chosen one of seven selectmen.

Dec. 27.—Capt John” is to assist the surveyor in laying out some land for Stephen fford near ” Bassats Bridge.*”

Nov. 21.—John Munson for £ij,o conveys to Caleb Hotchkiss, Junr, (son-in-law,) ” my Right in that Corn Mill in said NewHaven Called Munsons Mill, with all the Conveys” Munsons Mill.” , furniture, streems, Ponds and Dams, belonging to the same ; and allso the Land belonging to me that Lys between the eastermost Dam & y* highway.”

Sept. 21, 1741 Lord’s-day.—In Bacon’s Historical Discourses, pp. 214-217, is the story of a conference at Pastor Noyes’s residence, where most strange and painful scenes were presented. Rev. James Davenport, an enthusiast, grandson of the illustrious founder of New Haven Colony, was requested to give the reasons why he had reproached Pastor Noyes as unconverted, a hypocrite, an instrument of damnation, etc. After some interchanges, the enthusiast began a prayer, when Mr. Noyes forbade him, but he persisted amidst great disturbance—characterizing Mr. Noyes as unconverted, his people as sheep without a shepherd, etc. The particulars of the conference were ” minuted down at the time of it,” and subscribed by six of the gentlemen present, viz., Thomas Clap, president of Yale College, John Punderson, deacon of the First Church, Capt. John Munson, Capt. Theophilus Munson, Andrew Tuttle, and Samuel Mix. This document is in the Library of Yale College.

1745. (Aged 72.) Aug. 22.—”Deacon John Munson” for^120 old Tenor, conveys to John Read of Stanford, Ct, ” all my Right Title and Interest in one Certain Grist Mill in sd New Haven, Called & Known by the Name of Todds Mill,—being one Third part of sd Mill, Damm, streems, Land and appurtenances.” In 1746, J. R. transferred his interest in this mill to Daniel Todd.

Children of Sarah Cooper and John Munson are:

 

  1. John Munson, Jr.; b. 7 Jul 1693 in New Haven, Connecticut. d. 1745 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
  2. Elizabeth Munson was born on 15 May 1695 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died after 1765.
  3. Hannah Munson was born on 9 Feb 1696/1697 in New Haven, Connecticut
  4. Joel Munson was born on 18 Aug 1702. He died in 1775 in (prob.) Hamden, Connecticut
  5. Anne Munson was born on 18 Sep 1704 in New Haven, Connecticut.
  6. Amy Munson was born on 18 Sep 1704 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died after 1790 in Woodbridge, Connecticut.
  7. Ruth Munson was born on 30 Jan 1706/1707 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died on 21 May 1785.
  8. Mehitable Munson was born on 17 Oct 1709 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died on 26 Feb 1779 in New Haven, Connecticut.
  9. Sarah Munson was born on 27 Sep 1713 in New Haven, Connecticut. She died in Cheshire, Connecticut.

Samuel Munson

1643-1692/93

Shoemaker, Deacon, Auditor, Selectman, Treasurer, Leather-Sealer,

Schoolmaster, Envoy to the Governor, Constable, Dummer, Ensign

Samuel Munson

John Munson

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Ensign Samuel MUNSON (Thomas1) was born on 6 Aug 1643 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut to Thomas Munson and Johanna Mew. He was baptized on 7 Aug 1643 in New Haven, Connecticut. Samuel Munson and Martha Bradley were married on 26 Oct 1665 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. She was the daughter of Alice Pritchard and William Bradley. He was made an Ensign in 1675 in Wallingford, Connecticut. Samuel died in 1692/93 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.. Samuel Munson’s monument (see old photo, above) was near the west end of the burying-ground in Wallingford ; it was a small slab of sandstone, but I read it is no longer there.

Genealogical Dictionary states under Munson, or Monson:

Samuel, New Haven, only s. of Thomas, m. 26 Oct 1665, Martha, d. of William Bradley, had Martha, b. 6 May 1667; Samuel, 28 Feb. 1669; Thomas, 12 Mar. 1671; John, 26 Jan 1673; Theophilus, 1 Sept 1675; Joseph; Stephen, perhaps b. at Wallingford; Caleb at New Haven, 19 Nov. 1682; and Joshua, 7 Feb. 1684; all liv. in 1698; was freem. 1669; ensign at Wallingford 1675, yet contin. propr. 1685, and d. at N. H. 1692 or 3. His wid. m. a Preston.

Samuel Munson was the nineteenth signer of an agreement by thirty-four men proposing to become Planters at a new settlement in the wilderness twelve miles north-northeast of New Haven. It lay on a plain extending from south to north a mile or two, and situated about a mile eastward of the Quinnipiac, and was to be called Wallingford. Dr. Davis, in his History of Wallingford, observes that for ten years the inhabitants met for worship on the Sabbath in the houses of Lieut. N. Merriman and Ensign Samuel Munson.

In 1679, he was chosen to serve as the first schoolmaster, and he also served through the years as Deacon, auditor, selectman, treasurer, lister, recorder, leather-sealer, envoy to the governor, constable, and drummer and ensign in the militia.

In 1682, Samuel returned to New Haven, perhaps to make a home for his widowed father, Thomas, perhaps to become master of the Hopkins Grammar School, perhaps both. The earliest record book of the Hopkins Grammar School begins with 1684, and shows on January 4, ‘Agreed that Ensign Munson go on with the Grammar School at New Haven to make up his year current and his allowance to be 40 pounds, per annum as formerly. . . also that trial be made of the sufficiency of the said Ensign Munson, and if he be found sufficient to instruct or fit hopeful youth for the College. . . that he have 40 pounds for the ensuing year.’ Three months later, he laid down his charge and was succeeded by a graduate of Harvard College.

Hopkins Grammar School is still growing strong as of the year 2010. Founded in 1660, Hopkins School is the third-oldest educational institution in the United States in continuous operation and the second-oldest secondary school in North America. Hopkins was founded “for the breeding up of hopeful youths” with funds from Edward Hopkins’ estate to fulfill John Davenport’s wishes to bring a grammar school to New Haven. The school’s first home was a small building on the New Haven Green.

He is endlessly cited in, “1637-1887. The Munson record: A genealogical and biographical account of Captain Thomas Munson (a pioneer of Hartford and New Haven) and his descendants, Volume 1” by Myron Andrews Munson. You can see it here: http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA132&lpg=PA132&dq=%22New%20Haven%22%20%22John%20Munson%22%20miller&sig=RWz_v50XunuwkHxjJwSLTRJf0p0&ei=372cTNCeF5KjnQeGqti5DQ&ct=result&id=k0w6AAAAMAAJ&ots=aTSiFX-KQ6&output=text

 

He was declared a freeman in 1669 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.

1698. April 4—” this Land Recorded to Samuell monson his hares and a sines foreuer. Laid out for Samuell Monson that tow acers o Land that was granted as an addishon to his fathers Reuer Lot it Lieth one the west side of the common field in the cattall swomp bounded one the north east corner by a whit wood bush and at the north weast corner by a maple tree . . . lieth for tow a kers

Thomas Yall, Seruaer.” April 26—S.” M. is one of a school-committee of three whose duty is to secure ” some sutable parson to teach scoole.” Treasurer. gept 20—Samuel” was chosen treasurer by the town. Auditor Dec. 27—He was chosen “to oddiate the town accounts with treasurere Street,” to serve as one of the four “howards” of “the town-fieald,” and to act as one of the two collectors of Rev. Mr. Street’s ” rate.”

His Will, written with his own hand, is dated 11 July 1741. Most of its provisions have already been quoted piecemeal. To each of his sons Solomon’, William*, Waitstill’, and Merriman’, he had conveyed a full portion of land. Lent’ inherits the larger part of the estate, and is executor. Witnesses—Moses Merriman (step-son), Jehiel Tuttle, and Mary Merriman (aged 15, dau. of Moses).

Inventory of Ens. Samuel Munson’s Estate exhibited by Lent, Ex. Statement dated Wlfd Feb. 8, 1742. Prised by Daniel Tuttle & Jn! Miles.

” First of all a great brass Kettle 07 .. 00 .. o

. . . a large tramel 18/ a tramel & a hook &c . . a pair of tongs 6/ & peal 9/ . . a roast meat hook 2/ . . a pair bellows 14/ . . a pair of sheep sheers 5/ an old flesh fork /o . . two puter platers 10/ . . 3 feather beds—5 woolen Coverlids—1 tow do—3 rag—1 pr wooling Sheets ^3. therteen sheets £13 Six sheets 12/ each, five pi pillow bears £1 : 10 . . . five barrels of Syder ^4. … a barrel of beaf jQ-] a barrel of Pork £1$. . .

” A testament 1/6 a psalm book 1/6 a primer 1/6 Bunians holy war 2/ Umcharts Chatechism 3/ a Secretary Guide 2/ a Clark Guide 1/6 an act of parliament 7/ a vade mecum 6/ a Constable pocket book 1/ Earl upon ye Sacrament 1/6 Ben Wadsworth & a Culper 2/ a book of Baxters 7/

” A Cain £2. & a gun .£2. a warming pan £1 : 8 Seven pounds Bullets 11/3 a leaden Standish 3/ . . an our glass 2 6 a looking glass 1/ twelve woden bowls 12/7 trenchers 3/4 3 knives & a fork 5/ two great wheels £1 : 4 one little wheel with 2 rims £1. 2 pr spectacles 4/ a Pilyian £2 . . an hive of bees £1 5 rasors 15/ . . 1 pegging all 1/ 4 alls & Tacks 4/ a number of lasts & a Seat 15/

” 1 pr of oxen £32. 1 Cow & Calf £10. 3 Cows with Calf £11 a piece. 1 three year old heifer £S:10 a two year old Steer £5 1 draw horse £12 1 mare a paser £10 13 sheep .£15.

” 1 pr knee buckels 3/ 1 beaver hat £2 :10 1 pr of cotten breaches 6/ 1 holand shirt 18/ 2 Ditto £1 2 linnen shirts 10/ 1 p’ worsted Stockings 2/6 fourpenny nails 4800 15/ pr thousand and eight penny nails 2200 30/ p’ thousand 2 pr long breaches 5/ . . 18 bushel buck wheat ^7 :4 3 bushels beans £2 : 2 34 bushels of oats £6 :18 Shue nails 4/ 1 Inkhorn & pen knife 2/6 1 pidgeon net 12/ 90 bushels of Indian Corn at 8/ p’ Bushel . . 103lb of Iron at £5 :3 an old Sadie 18/ 4lb Steel £1 an old p’ Leather breaches 8/ rhy in y” house & barn ^34 flax in ye barn £1: 4 & 2 brass Sheers 8/ rhy upon ye Ground £26 1 ox hide £2 2 calf skins £1 :4, 2 . . 14/, [many farming implements.]

” A Short bodied Coat Camblet £2 a duroy Coat £4:10 & a vest duroy £1 : 15 a kiersey Coat £3 : & a p! of flannel Breaches £1:4 a great Coat ^5 a p’ of Leather breaches £1:4 a p’ of Linnen breeches 6/ a Caster hat £2 :5 a wig 15/ a Duffel Coat £1 a Duffel Coat £2 a Duffel west £1 a linnen Shirt 10/ one pare of Shoes 18/ 3 p’ Stockings 18/ Set of turning tules £1:10 [Various carpenter’s tools.]

” 27 acres Land* upon ye old plain 75 :

27 acres Land under ye plain bank 81 :

 

Below are some dateless transactions in real-estate:—

Layd out for Sam**’ Munson 38 acres on the west side ya river, “at y” upper end of wallnut hill,” on the right of his father.

Teen acors of Samll Munson his second Diu””” land is layed out in y” upor end of Whorttens brook swamp.”

Purchased 6 acres ” near y” head of Whorttens Brook.”

Thomas Yalle of W. sells Sam1″ Munson of W. tow acrees of bricke plane land, April 22, 1790 and 8 (perh. 1798).

Samuel Monson having purchased 6 acres of land of goodman parker upon the parsonag plaine ”

” Samuel’ and wife sell 13 A. for ^13 to Mary’s half-brother Joseph Preston (I. 1681).

28 acres Land over ye river by ye bridge 112:

6 acres Land at ye River Lot 18 :

6 acres Do at Larrance plain 18 :

20 D° at broad Swamp 200 :

8 D° at long hill 80 :

10 D° at y” west Rocks 15 :

Land in ye Sequester to lay out 10 :

a right in New Haven bounds 02 :

a homestead with a house & barn & orchard 390:

At his death in 1693, Samuel left an estate valued at 350 pounds.

Children of Samuel Munson and Martha Bradley were:

1.        Martha Munson, AKA Borne Martha Munson, b.6 MAY 1667 at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT d.24 APR 1728      at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT  m. Thomas ELCOCK  
2.        Samuel Munson, b. 28 FEB 1668/1669 at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT d.23 NOV 1741 at: Wallingford,New Haven Co.,CT 
3.        Thomas Munson, b.12 MAR 1670/1671 at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT d.28 SEP 1746 m. Mary Wilcoxson  15 SEP 1694      
4.        John Munson,  b. 28 JAN 1672/1673 at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT
5.        Theophilus Munson,b. 1 SEP 1675  at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT d.28 NOV 1747 at: New Haven,CT m. Esther MIX  
6.        Joseph Munson, b. 1 NOV 1677 at: Wallingford,New Haven Co.,CT  d. 30 OCT 1725      at: Wallingford,New Haven Co.,CT 
7.        Stephen Munson, b. 5 DEC 1679      at: Wallingford,New Haven Co.,CT  
8.        Caleb Munson, b. 19 NOV 1682  at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT d.23 AUG 
9.        Joshua Munson, b. 7 FEB 1684/1685 at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT d. 9 DEC 1711 at: Wallingford,New Haven Co.,CT 
10.     Israel Munson. B. 6 MAR 1686/1687 at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT d. BEF 18 JUN 1697  at: New Haven,New Haven Co.,CT

Thomas Munson

1612-1685

Immigrant Ancestor

Miltary Captain, Carpenter

Thomas Munson

Samuel Munson

John Munson

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Thomas Munson (1) (AKA Monson) was born before 13 Sep 1612 in Rattlesden, County Suffolk, England to John Munson and Elizabeth Sparke. He was baptized on 13 Sep 1612 in Rattlesden, County Suffolk, England. John and Johanna Mew were married in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. He died on 7 May 1685 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. He was buried on 9 May 1685 in Grove St. Cemetery, New Haven, Connecticut.  Burial: Row 78,  9 Linden Ave

His first wife Susan emigrated after Thomas in 1634 aboard the Elizabeth at the age of 24. In Hotten’s Lists 0f Emigrants, page 279, appear ” the names and ages of all the Passengers which tooke shipping In the Elizabeth of Ipswich, M’r Willia Andrews, bound for new Eng Land the last of Aprill 1634 ;” one of them is ” Susan Munson, aged 25.” This Susan, three years older than Thomas, may have been his wife. Hannah’ Munson Tuttle named her second daughter Susannah. It is impossible to doubt that Joanna Munson, who was two years older than Thomas, who died seven years before him, and whose gravestone is a twin to that of Thomas, was his wife, though possibly by a second marriage. Hannah’ Munson Tuttle named her first daughter Joanna, a name which is somewhat rare.

 The earliest record of Thomas Munson is in 1637 when he was one of the men from Hartford, Conn., who served under Captain Mason during the Pequot War, and took part in the historical battle fought between the English and the Pequots under Sassacus, near New London, at daylight June 5, 1637.  He was about twenty-five years of age at the time. Thomas was one of the 130 Connecticut men to see military service in the Pequot Indian War. For this service, he was allotted a house lot of two and a half acres on High Street.

In 1639 he quit the Hartford plantation and cast his lot with the new settlement at Quinnipac, later to be called New Haven. On Jun 4 1639, he was the sixth signer of the Fundamental Agreement, drawn up for their government on June 4, of that year.

He was a military man- Sargent in 1643, which title he bore for nineteen years, Ensign in 1661, Lieutenant in 1665. Thomas was made Captain in 1676 and placed in charge of all the New Haven troops. For his service in King Philips War (1675/76) he was granted 26 acres of land in New Haven. He served in all the Indian Wars from the Pequot War in 1637 to King Philip’s War in 1675. Thomas was a representative in 1666 in the Indian War, in the Hartford contingent, involved in the destruction of Pequot Fort under Captain Mason on June 5, 1667. He was offered land in New Haven if he would make wheels and ploughs for the good of the colony. He commanded New Haven troops defending the Norrituck Plantation against Indians.

On the northern margin of the present city of Hartford was a cleared and fertile tract of 28 acres, which the grateful town allotted to the returning heroes ; it has been known as the Soldiers’ Field. In a paper on ” The Soldiers’ Field and Its Original Proprietors,” which was read before the Conn. Historical Society, and printed in the Courant of June 18, 1887, F. H. Parker stated that eight acres of this Field early became the property of Zachariah Field ; his tract ” contained thirteen allotments, the most southern of which was that of Thomas Hale, adjoining the Spencer lot; then came in order the lots of Samuel Hale, William Phillips, Thomas Barnes, and Thomas Munson.”

He represented the town as Deputy to the General Court/Assembly from 1662-1679 and 1681-1682.

The first trial by jury in the Colony was held October 3, 1663, and Thomas Munson was appointed foreman of that jury.  During the latter part of his life, Captain Thomas Munson was prominent in all the affairs of the town.  During these years he served as Townsman, Deputy, and on various committees in the church, as well as in other capacities, and it may well be said of him that he was a “Prominent Citizen”, for he was all that.  He was a man whose memory we delight to honor.

” There were then two famous churches gathered at New-Haven: gathered in two days, one following upon the other ; Mr. Davenport’s and Mr. Prudden’s: and this with one singular circumstance, that a mighty barn was the place wherein that solemnity was attended.” Thus the Magnalia. The New Haven and Milford churches were organized Aug. 21 and 22, 1639. In that barn, on the 4th of June previously, the ” Fundamental Agreement” of the colony was enacted. Now this ” mighty barn” stood on Elder Robert Newman’s home-lot, and Newman’s place became Thomas Munson’s residence in 1662.

Does one inquire for a definite answer to the question—What banished scores of the ablest, most devoted, most spiritual ministers, with 4,000 of their fellow-Christians, into a wilderness peopled with savages? Hear then the answer: A conscientious refusal to practice certain ceremonies of human invention which had been added to the worship of God—unscriptural, unwarrantable, profane, as they believed ; they could not conform to the requirements of the bishops and their courts in respect to these human inventions. That the silenced ministers might preach the Gospel, and that they and their fellow-Christians might have liberty to worship according to conscience, and that they might propagate Christianity among the aborigines, such were their primary motives in crossing the Atlantic. Our Thomas Munson—the supposition is credible and unavoidable—was among those Four Thousand exiled servants of God. He may have voyaged hither with Higginson in 1629, with Cotton and Hooker in 1633, or with other brave and spirited colonists, loyal to God and to conscience. Whence he came, when he came, with whom he came, may some day appear.

He was elected as representative in 1666 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. He was elected as representative between 1669 and 1675 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.

At the seating of the meeting-house, in 1647, ” Sister Munson ” was located in the ” 2d seat” on the side (as distinguished from ” the middle “); in 1656, Goodw. Munson ” and four others were ” Permitted to sit in the alley (upon their desire) for convenience of hearing,”—a little deaf, it would seem ; and in 1662, ” Sister Munson ” and four others were assigned a place ” Before Mrs. Goodyears seat”—in front of the pulpit.

It would not be surprising to learn that Munson was related by marriage or otherwise to Samuel Whitehead. They two were the only Hartford settlers who removed to New Haven; in 1647 they occupied the same seat in the meeting-house, and their wives sat side by side;  in 1656, the two men were seated side by side; and Thomas named his only son Samuel. Munson and Whitehead were withal the first and second sergeants of the force raised in 1653 to aid a war which had been declared against New Netherlands (Dutch). Munson lived in George St., and Whitehead at the corner of George and Meadow.

Thomas’ b. abt. 1612; m. Joanna* app’y, b. abt. 1610 ; she d. 13 Dec. 1678, a. 68 ; he d. 7 May 1685, a. 73. Carpenter, civic office, military service ; Cong.; res. Hartford, New Haven, Ct.

Land Ownership Map of New Haven in 1641 from The Munson Record, 1892, shows the locations of the three different homes of Thomas Munson, on George Street in 1640, on Church Street from 1656 to 1662, and finally on Grove Street across from the Green, which was a stately home inhabited by several generations of Munsons.

Thomas is buried next to his wife Joanna in the Grove Street Cemetery, the same place where Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin, is buried. The inscription reads:”Thomas Munson, Age 73; deceased. Time 7th of 3rd M 1685″.

Visit the website devoted to Thomas Munson here: http://hattonexley.homestead.com/Munson.html

The children of Thomas Munson and Johanna Mew are:

 

  1. Elisabeth MUNSON,
  2. Samuel Munson . 7 Aug. 1643 : ” Samuell Munson y’ Sonn of Thomas Munson was Baptised ye 7th 6m” 43.” Record of First Church, New Haven.
  3. Hannah MUNSON. b. 11 June 1648: “Hannah Munson 11. 4mo- 48.” Rec

 

Mary Nash

Abt. 1621- 1683

Immigrant Ancestress

Mary Nash

Samuel Alling

John Alling

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Nash was born in Kempston, Bedford, England about 1621. She was the eldest daughter of Thomas Nash. In 1642, Mary married Roger Allen (Alling) in New Haven, Connecticut. Mary died in New Haven on August 16, 1683. She is buried at the Center Church on the Green Churchyard in New Haven.

 

Mary Nash came with her parents to America in about 1637 at about 19 years of age. She married Roger Allen (Ailling) in New Haven in about 1642/1643. He died in 1674 and she did not remarry. New Haven Records: March 10, 1646 “Sister Allen asigned to sit in the 5th seat the women’s section in the crose seats at the end in the meeting house.”
Mary’s will was written July 17, 1682 in New Haven. Her three sons & two daughters, Samuel, John, James, Mary Moss & Sarah Peck were given items of furniture and various household goods. The four daughters (Sarah & Mary above), Elizabeth Alling & Susannah Alling were to equally divide her wearing apparel among them. The rest of her estate was to be equally divided among the children except for a double portion for the eldest son, Samuel, who was appointed sole executor.

 

The last Will and Testiment of Mary Ailing of New Haven – widow

 

Not knowing how soon my last change may bee, and being at this present in competent understanding and memory doe

order and dispose of that worldly estate I have to dispose of, in manner and form as followeth.

 

Imprimis – I give to my eldest son Samuel Ailing- a feather bed upon which I lodge, and bolsters and two pillows and

the best coverlette and the biggest brasse pan and one of the biggest pewter platters.

 

Item- I give unto my son John Ailing my biggest brasse kettle and one of the biggest pewter platters and the greene

rugge and my great chest that stands in the lean too.

 

Item – I give unto my son James Ailing the best flocke bed and one feather bolster and two pillows and curtains

about the bed and the bed stead and one payre of the best sheets and a greene coverlette and two blankets and ye fur-

nace and ye cast brasse skillett and six napkins and one table cloth and one of ye biggest pewter platters and one cow.

 

Item – I give unto my daughter Mary Mosse a flocke bed and bolster and two pillows and the single greene cover-

lette and one blanket and one payre sheets and the great iron kettle and one of the biggest pewter platters and my

trunk.

 

Item – I give unto my daugter Sarah Peck the lesser brasse pan, and one of the biggest pewter platters, and the wain-

scott chest that stands in ye chamber and the dark colored covercloth and one blanket and the great iron skillett.

 

And all the rest of my estate (after my just debts are paid) whether within the house or abroad, in cattle or other-

wise I doe heartily appoint to be equally divided among all my children, only my son Samuel Ailing to have a double

part – my wearing apparel excepted, all these I give to my four daughters, Mary Mosse, Sarah Peck, Elizabeth Ailing

and Susanna Ailing, to be equally divided among them.

 

Also I doe define and appoint my eldest son Samuel Ailing to be my sole executor of this my last will and testament,

and in confirmation that I ordain this my last will and testa- ment I hereunto sett my hand and seal this seventeenth day

of July, 1682.

 

Her mark.

 

 

Mary N. Alling.

 

 

Children of Mary Nash and Roger Allen (Ailing) are:

 

  1. Mary Alling  Nov. 26, 1643; d. Mar. iS, 1716. She married Joseph Moss on 11 Apr 1667
  2. Samuel Alling Nov. 4, 1645; baptized the New Haven Colony on November 4, 1645,  d. Aug. 28, 1709
  3. John Alling Oct. 2. 1647; was baptized in New Haven Colony on October 2, 1647, and died on March 25, 1717. He married Susanna Coe on 11 Jan 1671.
  4. Sarah Alling Oct. 12, 1649, was baptized in New Haven Colony on October 12, 1649, and died in 1743. She married Joseph Peck on 28 Nov 1672
  5. Elizabeth Alling was born in New Haven Colony about 1651.
  6. Susanna (AKA Susan) Alling born in New Haven Colony about 1653.
  7. James Alling (Reverend) was born in New Haven Colony on June 24, 1657, and died on March 13, 1696. He married Elizabeth Cotton on 2 Jun 1690.

Thomas Nash

Immigrant Ancestor

Commander, Blacksmith, Gunsmith

1589-1658

Thomas Nash

Mary Nash

Samuel Alling

John Alling

Mary Alling

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Thomas Nash, called “sonne of Thomas”, was baptized 27 March, 1589 at St. Leonard’s Church in Bewdley, according to Gertrude Nash Locke in “Lives & Times of the Nash Family”. He married Margery Baker, daughter of Nicholas and Mary (Hodgetts) Baker.  Thomas died May 12, 1658. Burial: Center Church on the Green Churchyard.

Thomas Nash, who came with the Davenport Colony in 1637, is the ancestor of many of the Connecticut families of that name.

 

“On the 26 July, 1637, from the ship Hector and another not named, a company landed at Boston, Mass., formed principally by merchants of London, whose wealth and standing at home enabled them to come out under more favorable auspices than any company that had hitherto souglit these shores. They were accompanied by the Rev. John Davenport as their Pastor, and are supposed to have been mostly members of his Church and Congregation in Coleman treet, London.”

 

The Leaders were men of good practical understanding, and provided for the anticipated wants of an infant Colony, by learning trades and arts such as were likely to be most needed.

 

In this company was Thomas Nash, his wife Margery, and their five children.

 

Thomas Nash was one of the members of the Rev. John Robinson’s Congregation at Leyden, Holland, part of whom were the first settlers at Plymouth, 1620; others came to New England soon afterward. On November 30, 1625, five of those at Leyden addressed a letter to their brethren at Plymouth and signed it as brethren in the Lord. The names of the five were Francis Jessop, Thomas Nash, Thomas Blossom, Roger White, Richard Maisrerton. Blossom came to Plymouth afterward. Thomas Nash returned to England and came over again with the Davenport Colony.

 

The people of Massachusetts Bay were anxious to have this company choose a location within their limits and made very advantageous offers to induce them to do so. But they preferred a new Colony, and Air. Eaton and others selected Quinnipiac, now called New Haven.

 

March, 1638, the whole company sailed from Boston and in about a fortnight landed at Quinnipiac. In November they purchased the land from Momauguin and his counsellors. June 4, 1639, they met in Mr. Newman’s barn and after solemn religious exercises drew up the fundamental agreement. Thomas Nash was the sixty-sixth signer.

 

Thomas Nashe signed the Guilford compact, but did not go to Guilford finally, although great inducements were offered him, as they needed a gunsmith, the vocation he had chosen.*

 

Thomas was the Commander of the ship, “Charles” sailing to London on June the 21 1679. He was a smith and a gun smith. His house was on the west side of State Street in New Haven.

 

“He is generally mentioned in the Records in an affectionate way, as Brother Nash, and was occasionally appointed to those public offices which were consigned with declining years.”

 

The following extract from the Record of a General Court lield the 25 May, 1646, seems to imply age :

 

“Jr. -egard of several occasions and works to be done against r.a,-” – day. Brother Nash is spared.”

 

• On i’^ of 7^”^ moneth (Sept.), 1640, Air. Lamberton and Thomas Nash were admitted members of the Gen Court and received the freemans charge.”

 

The following extract from the Records of a General Court held j\Iay 19, 1651, indicates his vocation: “It is ordered that Thomas Nash shall keepe the Towne Muskitts in his hands, and look to them well, that they be always in good order, fitt for service and that the Towne allow him what is Just for his care and pains.” Thomas Nash’s home-lot was on the west side of State Street, about a third of the distance from Chapel to Elm Street, as shown on an old map of New Haven settlers. (This area looks like it now runs next to the railroad tracts.)

 

According to [William] Berry, he (Thomas) came from Bewdley in Worcestershire. (Gen. and Ped. of Hertfordshire Families, pp. 83–85.) He sailed with the Whitefield party arriving at Quinnipac or New Haven, in July, 1639, and was one of the signers of the agreement to remain together made on shipboard. Savage says he was of Guilford in 1639, but this is probably a mistake. (Steiner’s History of Guilford, 1897, pp. 23, 29, 48.) New Haven, Col. Rec., (I, p. 82) says: “brother Nash his shoppe did stand by the creeks.” He was a gunsmith, and probably well advanced in life at the time of the emigration, for his eldest son John was old enough to be made Freeman, April, 1642, and in his will of August 1st, 1657, he mentions his old age. The first date attached to his name at New Haven, is “1t of the 7th Moneth 1640″, when he was admitted member of the General Court and received the charge of Freeman. His home lot was on the west side of State Street, about one-third distance from Chapel to Elm St. He was chosen a Fence Viewer “for Mr. Eatons & Mr. Davenports quarter”, March, 1645–6. May 25, 1646, the General Court ordered: “In regard of severall occassions and worke to be done agaynst trayning day, bro: Nash is spared.” Before emigration, he was a member of the church in Leyden, Holland, and was on of five who wrote an interesting letter (given in full on pages 155, 156 & 157 of vol. 1 of the 4th Series of the Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll., 1852.) from there, Nov. 30, 1625, to their brethren in Plymouth, informing them of the death of John Robinson, Pastor of the church, which included in its membership the planters in Plymouth as well as those left in Leyden.

 
"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The last will and Testrmient of Thomas Nash, late of New Haven  deceased-
-Made the 1 of August 1657.
 
I Thomas Nash of New Haven being weake in body, but of sound memory doe make «S: ordaine this my last will and Testament, First I committ my soule into the hands of my Lord Jesus Christ by whose merrits I hope to be saved, and my body to be burycd at the discretion of my sonncs, in hope of a joyful resurrection. 

And for my worldly goodcs w'^'*' God hath given mee — my \vill is to dispose of it as followcth, fu'sl I give to my Eldest Sonne John Nash of Nev.-haven fourty pounds to be paid to him by my executor within two yeares after my desease by io£ at the end of every half yeare wh"-'!' forty pounds w^-'^ that w'* I have already given him, wil make up to him a full double portion

Item. I give to my son Joseph Nash, twenty shilling to be paid to him w^ithin two yeares after my desease.
Item. I give to my daughter Mary, wife to Roger Allen, forty shillings to be paid her within two yeares after my desease
Item. I give to my daughter Sarah, wife to Rob* Talmadg, forty shillings to be paid to her within two yeares of my desease.
Item. I give tc my Sonne Timothy my house, with all my lands with all other my gooes estate, that is undisposed oil by this my will. And I doe make, ordaine anc appoint him my sole Executo'". The reason of my so disposing of my house and land is, because he hath been very helpful! to mee in my old age and hath done much more & yet w"-*^ no other of my children, would, or could de. And my eldest son John hath a house and lott already — farther my will is that all these legasies to my children be paid in such pay 6; at such prise; as usually passeth in this place betwixt man and man, and my desire and will is that my beloved ffriends and Brethren, M^ ]Matthew Gilbert and Johr Wakeman be overseers of this my last will where unto I have set my handthis first day of August 1657. 

Thomas Nash

THE NINE SQUARES OF ANCIENT NEW HAVEN


A copy of the 1641 Brockett map as shown in “Three Centuries of New Haven, 1638-1938”
by Rollin G. Osterweis, published in 1953 by Yale Univ. Press

SQUARE 1 (top left): Edmund Tapp, James Prudden, Peter Prudden, William Fowler, Thomas Osborne, Wid. Baldwin, An Elder, Richard Platt, Zachariah Whitman.

SQUARE 2 (top middle): Thomas James, T. Powell (?), Widow Greene, Thomas Yale, Thomas Fugill, John Punderson, John Johnson, Abraham Bell, Edward Wigglesworth, John Burwell(?), Joshua Atwater, Mrs. Constable, Mr. Mayres, John Evanse

SQUARE 3 (top right): William Thorp, Robert Hill, Wid. Williams, Andrew Low, Jeremiah Dixon, Edw. Tench(?), Anne Higginson, Mr. Lucas, Deamor(?), David Atwater, John Goffinch(?), Francis Newman, Henry Browning

SQUARE 4 (center left): Thomas Buckingham, Thomas Welch, Jo. Whitehead(?), Samuel Bailey, William Hawkins, Richard Miles, Nathaniel Axtell, Stephen Goodyear, Henry Stonehill, Thomas Gregson

SQUARE 6 (center right): Francis Brewster, Mark Nance(?), Jarvis Boykin, Benjamin Ling, Mrs. Eldred, Robert Newman, Mr. Marshall, Richard Beckley, William Andrews, John Cooper

SQUARE 7 (bottom left): Roger Alling, John Brockett, Mr. Hickocks, John Budd, William Jeanes(?), Nath Elsey(?), Robert Seeley, Benjamin Fenn, William Wilkes, George Lamberton, Thomas Jeffrey, Mr. Mansfield, Richard Hull, William Preston

SQUARE 8 (bottom center): Matthew Gilbert, Thomas Kimberly, Owen Rowe, Mr. Davenport’s Walk, An Elder, Jasper Crane, John Davenport, John Chapman, John Benham, Thomas Nash, Richard Malbon

SQUARE 9 (bottom right): Richard Perry, Nathaniel Turner, Ezekial Cheever, Theophilus Eaton, David Yale, Mr. Eaton, Samuel Eaton, William Tuttle

OTHER: William Ives, George Smith, Widow Sherman, Matthew Malstron, Anthony Thompkin, John Reeder, Robert Cogswell, Mathias Hitchcock, Francis Ball, Richard Osborne, William Potter, James Clark, Edward Patteson, Andr. Hull, Saml. Wilthead, John Clark, Edw. (?), John Moss, John Charles, Richard Beach, Arthur Halbidge, William Peck, Timothy Ford, John Potter, Widow (?), Thomas Trowbridge, Henry Rutherford, John Livermore, Peter Brown, Daniel Hall(?), James Russell, George Ward, Lawrence Ward, Moses Wheeler…                                                           Typical Early Settler Home

The children of Thomas Nash and Margery Baker are:

1.  John Nash was born about 1615, and died in New Haven, Connecticut Colony, on July 3, 1687. He married Elizabeth Tapp, daughter of Edmund Tapp; she died on May 1, 1676, in New Haven. They had four children: Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, and Hannah.Per Early New England Settlers, which contains much additional information, his New Haven tombstone reads: HERE LYth THE BODY / OF THE HONOVRED & / WORTHY MAOr JOHN / NASH AGED 72 DE / CEASED JULYYe3 / 1687
2.  Timothy Nash was baptized in Bewdley, Worcestershire, England, on February 15, 1617/8, and died in Bewdley on July 21, 1618. Since Joseph and Timothy were baptized together, they probably were twins. He lived only about four months.
3.  Joseph Nash was baptized in Bewdley on February 15, 1617/8, and died in Bewdley. Since Joseph and Timothy were baptized together, they probably were twins. There is no death record for Joseph as there is for the first Timothy, but since his parents named a later son Joseph, he probably died young.
4.  Mary Nash was born in Kempston, Bedford, England, about 1621, and died in New Haven on August 16, 1683 m. Roger Allen (or, Ailing)
5.  Sarah Nash: She married Robert Talmadge. They had six children: Abigail, Thomas, Sarah, John, Enos, and Mary
6.  Timothy Nash was born in Bewdley about 1626, and died in Hadley, Massachusetts, on March 13, 1699. He married Rebecca Stone, daughter of Samuel Stone; she died in March or April of 1709. They had two children: Rebecca and Samuel
7.  Joseph Nash was baptized in Bewdley on July 1, 1627, and died in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1678. He married twice, Mary and Margaret, and had three children: John, Hannah, and Sarah. (Sergeant Joseph Nash of Hartford.)
8.  Samuel Nash was born in Bewdley on March 29, 1630. Samuel does not appear in written sources given at the end of this page, but was found by Dorothy Roberts in the parish register of St. Leonard's Church, Ribbesford Parish, Bewdley, Worcestershire, England. The entries for Joseph and Timothy were on the same LDS microfilm, but not John, Mary, and Sarah.

[References:] Atwater’s New Haven, p. 125; Savage, 3, p. 262; The Nash Family, by the Rev. Sylvester Nash; Schenck’s Fairfield, I, p. 396.

http://www.uillis.com/taylor_nash/nash.html

Jane Nicholl

1605-1672

Immigrant Ancestress

Jane Nicholl

Matthew Moulthrop

Hanna Moulthrop

William B. Russell

Nicholas Russell

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Jane Nicholl was born in 1605 in Wrawby, Lincolnshire, England to Thomas Nicholl and Dorothy George. She married Matthew Moulthrop 13 May 1633, in Wrawby, Lincolnshire, England, and died 13 May 1672 in New Haven,New Haven, CT.

 

Jane immigrated in the year 1639.

 

Children of Jane Nicholl and Matthew Moulthrop are:

 

Elizabeth Moulthrop, born 1638

  1. Elizabeth Moulthroup, born in Plymouth Colony, MA; died 09 Oct 1689 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; MA (may be the same Elizabeth)
  2. Matthew Moulthrop, born 1639; died 01 Feb 1690/91 in East Haven; married Hannah Thompson 26 Jun 1662 in East Haven, CT
  3. Mary Moulthrop, born 1641

 

George Pardee

1624-1700

Immigrant Ancestor

George Pardee

Mary Pardee

Stephen Hotchkiss

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

George Pardee was born 19 Feb 1624, baptized on 19 February 1624 at Pitminster, Somerset, England.He was the son of the Reverend Anthony Pardee and Anstice Cox. George Pardee married Martha Miles, daughter of Richard Miles, on 20 October 1650 at New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. George Pardee married an unknown person on 29 December 1662 at New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. He died on 14 April 1700 at New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, at age 76

 

Children of George Pardee and Martha Miles are:

 

  1. John Pardee   b. 20 Aug 1651, d. c 28 Jun 1653
  2. John Pardee   b. 2 Dec 1653, d. 1683
  3. George Pardee+   b. 15 Jan 1656, d. 22 Nov 1723
  4. Mary Pardee   b. 18 Apr 1658, Married Joshua Hotchkiss d. c 1684
  5. Elizabeth Pardee   b. 10 Jun 1660

Citations

  1. Customer Pedigree, World Family Tree Vol. 5, Tree #2881
  2. Donald Lines Jacobus, The Pardee Genealogy, p. 89-90.
  3. Donald Lines Jacobus, Ancient New Haven, p. 118

Mary Pardee

1658-1684

Mary Pardee

Stephen Hotchkiss

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Pardee was born April 18, 1658 to George Pardee and  Martha Miles .    Mary married Joshua Hotchkiss 29 Nov 1677, and died about 1684.

 

The children of Mary Pardee and Joshua Hotchkiss are:

 

  1. Mary Hotchkiss born on 30 Apr 1679 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.
  2. Martha Hotchkiss was born on 14 Dec 1680 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. She was married to Thomas BROOKS on 25 Mar 1702 in Wallingford, New Haven Co., CT.
  3. Stephen Hotchkiss born on 25 Aug 1681 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. married to Elizabeth SPERRY on 12 Dec 1704 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.  He died on 5 May 1756 in New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.

The New England historical and genealogical register, Volume 66 pg. 324 – 328

New England Marriages: Prior to 1700 (Clarence Almon Torrey), Torrey, Clarence Almon, ((Baltimore:MD, Genealogical Publishing Company, 1997), NEHGS #B2-84750), 929/.374 ED: 20., p. 390 (Reliability: 3).

New Haven: Families of Ancient New Haven (Donald Lines Jacobus), Jacobus, Donald Lines, ((Baltimore:MD, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), NEHGS #B2-65020), 4:797, 8:795 (Reliability: 3).

Connecticut: Barbour collection of Connecticut town vital records (Lorraine Cook White), White, Lorraine Cook, ((Baltimore, Md. : Genealogical Pub. Co., c1994-); ISBN: 0-8063-1443-5 (v. 1) 0-8063-1461-3 (v. 2) ; LC CALL NO.: F104.A58W481994; FORMAT: Book ; LCCN: 94-76197 //r95), 929/.37464 ED: 20., p. 474 (Reliability: 3).

Savage (Colonial Records 1620-1720), Savage, James, ((Boston:MA, Little, Brown & Co.,, 1982 ); (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1969); (FHL# 974/D2s)), GS 929.294, S264; 974/U2e., 3:344 (Reliability: 3).

 

The Parmelees

SURNAME’S MEANING

It’s believed that this name is a compound of “palmer” and “lea.”

In 1086, William the Conqueror ordered a statistical survey of England be done to register the landed wealth of the country to determine taxes. It was at this time that many families first came up with their surnames. About 43% of surnames today are the names of places — Brooks, Woods, Hill, Moore, Atwater (at water), etc.; another 32% are descendant names — Johnson (John’s son), McDonald (son of Donald), Petersen (son of Peter), etc.; another 15% are occupational names — Baker, Smith, Cooper (maker of barrels), Chapman (merchant or trader), etc.; and about 9% are nicknames — Stout, Goodman, Longfellow, Smart, Reid (for a red-haired man), etc.

‘Palmer” — and there are relatively a lot more of these families than ours — is the name many men who participated in the Crusades at various times from 1095 to 1270 chose for their surname. The legend goes that these warriors returned home with palm fronds to show that they’d returned from the Holy Lands.

“Lea” is another word for field, or meadow.

Thus, our name means “the palmer’s field” — a combination of occupation and location.

Chances are the first families to have this name lived in a field that belonged to someone who fought in the Crusades — or the head of the household himself was a Crusader who lived in a field.

While there are a few instances of surnames sounding like ours on the Continent, there are only two places in England where the name existed in the late 1500s: the North, where it’s usually spelled “Parmley” and can still be found today, and the South where the family only lived a few generations before settling in New England in the 1630s.

SPELLING

Few of the early European immigrants could read or write. And those who could just jotted down what sounded right to their ear. After all, spelling wasn’t the focus of their writing — getting the message across was. Life in the 17th and 18th centuries was harsh. People struggled just to survive, to find food, shelter and protection from Native American tribes and other European settlers. Spelling took a back seat to getting through one day at a time.

The 1659 will and inventory of John Sr., for example, shows his last name as “Parmaly” and “Parmely,” and his son’s name spelled as “Parmile” — all on the same document! For all we know, John Sr. may never have been literate; no copy of his signature survives. (No, that is not his signature on the contemporary copy of the Plantation Covenant.) Most of the family’s Colonial era tombstones in Connecticut spell it Parmele, while today’s most popular spellings are “Parmelee” and “Parmley,” according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

In our nation’s earliest days, when the majority of the population could barely read and write, many relied on others to do their writing for them. Early census records often reflected what the census taker thought was the “right” spelling. Even as late as 1870, census records show that one in five Americans under 21 was illiterate.

The Civil War in the 1860s helped bring spelling to the forefront. Since the telegraph had made long-distance communication possible, the folks back home wanted to know if those names on the Union and Confederate casualty lists that they were receiving were those of their sons. At this point uniform spelling became important — not only to get the right amount of dots and dashes transmitted — but to know if that casualty on the list was theirs.

Various branches of the family have handed down stories about why they changed the spelling of their last name — a dispute between father and son, a run-in with the law, etc. Tales like these are common in most families. These may very well be true — or not! Take them with a grain of salt.

However, it is important to note that “Palmer” (a corruption of it that’s come to be “Parmer”) and “Parmenter” and their various spellings are not associated with our family.

ENGLAND TO CONNECTICUT

 

The First Generations

Although there are records of earlier Parmelees on the Continent who probably are our ancestors, their relationships with our known family have not been established with any certainty. With my recent finds in Lewes and the records we’ve collected over the years about our Colonial ancestors, I now believe these are the last generations of our family in England and the first in America.

 

Why? Well, there are only two areas of England that the name can be found during this time period: south of London in Lewes, and up north, near the border with Scotland, in Middleton-in-Teesdale. None of the names of the northern family fit in with the Connecticut family, but those in the south found in Lewes parish records. The Parmelee records at All Saints run from 1572-1620; those from St. Michael from 1628-1638 (with one from 1610). No family records can be found after November, 1638, shortly before John Sr. left for America and ended up in Guilford, Conn. There still remains a 12-year gap between the bulk of entries between the two churches, but I think we’ll probably find the family in another parish in or near Lewes.

 

It’s fairly certain now that the vast majority of North American Parmelees of various spellings can call Lewes home, while the smaller Parmley branch that settled first in Pennsylvania and then moved to the Midwest and Salt Lake City, are tied to Middleton-in-Teesdale. The two families may be linked in some way in England but as of yet, I don’t know how.

 

Thanks to Jim Walters of the Family Parmelee website for information. http://www.thefamilyparmelee.com/

 

 

 

Alonzo T. Parmelee*

1836-1881

Farmer

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Alonzo T. Parmelee (Erastus7,Joshua6,Joshua5,Jehiel4,Joshua3,John2,John1)  was (born November 11, 1834?) 24 OCT 1835 in New York, the son of Erastus K. Parmelee and his wife Wealthy. On April 8, 1856, he married Ophelia Russell, daughter of Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr. and Amanda Malvina Maxfield. He died 4 MAR 1881 in Ransom, Hillsdale at the age of 46 years, four months and 23 days. He is buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Osseo, MI.

 

 

Alonzo and his wife Ophelia were witnesses to the wedding of Eratus K. Parmelee Jr. and his bride Mary Lafferty.

Alonzo’s stepmother, Caroline Parmelee was a witness to the marriage of Alonzo and Ophelia.

Lakeview Cemetery in Hillsdale has an Alonzo Parmelee, and Reese Cemetery near Battle Creek Mi has an Alonzo Parmelee and his wife, Bessie, but he died in 1975. No connection that I know of.

 

Enumerated on the 2nd day of June 1880
1880 CENSUS Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan

Alonzo PARMALEE Head (of household) M(ale) W(hite) M(arried) age 45 Farmer (occupation) NY CT NY (Birthplace)
Ophelia PARMALEE Wife F W M age 42 Keeping House OH — NY
Homer PARMALEE Son M W S age 20 Laborer MI NY OH
Francis W. PARMALEE Dau F W S age 17 Attends School MI NY OH
Mary PARMALEE Dau F W S age 13 MI NY OH
Cora PARMALEE Dau F W S age 8 MI NY OH
Elmer P. PARMALEE Son M W S age 3 MI NY OH
Amanda HENMAN Mother L F W W age 70 NY (Ophelia’s mother, who remarried)

Milliard RUSSELL BroL M W S age 24 Laborer OH — NY (Ophelia’s brother)

 

Ransom Township Plat Map of 1872

You will find Alonzo T. Parmelee under the “E” at the top.

For a larger view, see http://www.jowest.net/Genealogy/Maps/Ransom1872.htm

 

Children of Ophelia Russell and Alonzo Parmelee are:

 

  1. Emma Jane Parmelee b. 1857, m. John Miller in Hillsdale Co, MI in1873, d. Bef. 1941
  2. Homer Parmelee, b. Walton, Mi. 1860 m. Ada Typhers abt 1882, d. aft. 1946. Bur. Evergreen Cemetery Hillsdale Co.Had stillborn child in 1892.
  3. Frances Parmelee, b. Jefferson, Mi., m.  Henry Kroh  d. 1941 Hillsdale Co, MI Bur Maple Grove Cemetery Hillsdale Co.MI
  4. Mary Parmelee, b. Portland, Or. m.  James Howes, d. Bef. 1941
  5. Elmer Perry Parmelee (AKA Perry), b. Chicago, Il. Mar. 3, 1877 (headstone sayds 1876), m. Jennie Bertha Tillman Abt 1901 (d. 1951 Hillsdale Co, MI) d. 1959 Hillsdale Co, MI Bur. Maple Grove Cemetery Hillsdale Co. MI
  6. Cora Belle Parmelee, b. May 22, 1873  in Hillsdale Co, MI., m. Sylvanus (Sylvenas H) Spicer Hillsdale Co, MI in 1894, d. Bef. 1941

 

Their kids seem to have been born all over the country.

                                              Above: 1894 Hillsdale City Directory

The county librarian has no idea what the “Champaign” after his name means…usually it is the street name, but there is no street by that name in the area.

 

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=glines&id=I17283

Erastus K Parmelee

1809-1896

Founder of Parmelee, MI

Farmer

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Erastus K. Parmelee (Joshua6,Joshua5,Jehiel4,Joshua3,John2,John1) was born 22 SEP 1809 in Spafford,Onondaga, New York, the son of Joshua Parmelee and  Eunice Smith. He died 10 MAR 1896 in Thornapple,Barry,Michigan. He married Wealthy (maiden name unknown) who was born ABT 1810 in New York. After her death, in 1850 he married Caroline H. Cook, who was born in 1825. She may have been a widow, as in the 1850 Census, there is a Susan Cook (age 5) (and possibly Emma [age 3] has the last name of Cook) living with them. He either married one more time (see Barry County census) or Caroline’s middle name was Harriet, and she is listed under that. He died DEC 1896 in Jefferson, Hillsdale, Michigan, was buried 14 MAR 1896 in Thornapple, Barry, Michigan Parmalee Cemetery

 

In 1846, E.K. Parmelee was a Justice of the Peace in Hillsdale, MI.

 

Parmelee, Michigan was named for Erastus K. Parmelee who, after pioneering in Lenawee and Hillsdale Counties from 1836 to 1860, emigrated in 1831. E.K. Parmelee was the postmaster of this hamlet.

 

 

 

In 1878 twelve persons organized the Parmalee Methodist Church. The small congregation met at various locations until 1884, when this church was built on land given to the Methodist Trustee Board by Oliver and Bernice Carpenter. On September 15, 1884, the congregation held its first services in the original portion of this Gothic-style wood-frame building. The following year the Reverend M. D. Marsh became the church’s first resident pastor. In 1903, Clara Joels, daughter of the village’s founder Erastus K. Parmalee, gave additional property to the church for a horse and buggy shed. In 1913 a basement was built beneath the church. In 1961 the final addition was completed.

 

1850 Hillsdale Census

 

Alonzo Parmelee                15    NY              381b  17

Caroline Parmelee              25    NY              381b  15

Elenora Parmelee                7     NY              381b  19

Erastus K Parmelee            41    NY              381b  14

Erastus K. Jr Parmelee        7     NY              381b  18

Orrin Parmelee                    18    NY             381b  16

 

Enumerated on the 23rd day of August 1850
1850 Federal CENSUS Jefferson, Hillsdale, Michigan
135/ 140

 

Erastus K. Parmelee age 41 Male Farmer NY
Caroline age 25 Female NY
Orin age 18 Male Farmer NY
Alonzo  age 15 Male NY
Erastus R. Jr. age 7 Male MI
Elenora age 7 Female MI
Susan COOK age 5 Female NY
Emma J. age 3 Female NY
Orpha HEWLETT age 38 Female NY
Sally age 66 Female MI

Enumerated on the 12th day of July 1860
1860 CENSUS Thornapple, Barry, Michigan

761/ 673 Erastus Parmelee age 47 Male Farming NY
Caroline age 34 Female NY
Erastus Jr. age 17 Male MI
Elenora age 16 Female MI
Susanna age 14 Female MI
Linas age 8 Male MI
Palaski age 5 Male MI
Francis age 2 Male MI

Enumerated on the 13th day of August 1870
1870 CENSUS Thornapple, Barry, Michigan

172/ 167 Erastus Parmelee age 61 M W Farmer NY
Caroline H. age 45 F W Keeping House NY
Susan age 23 F W Domestic Self NY
Linus S. age 18 M W R. R. Laborer MI
Pulaski G. age 15 M W Farm Laborer MI
Marion F. age 11 M WMI
Wealthy age 9 F WMI
Charles age 1 M WMI

Enumerated on the 14th day of June 1880 (Indexed Parmlee)
1880 CENSUS Thornapple, Barry, Michigan
182/ 183

 

Erastus Parmelee Head M W M age 71 Farmer NY — —
Harriet Wife F W M age 54 KeepingHouse NY NY NY
Wealthy Dau F W S age 19 AtHome MI NY NY
Charles Son M W S age 11 AtSchool MI NY NY
Cyrus BLOWERS Farm Hand M W S age 61 Farm Laborer NY

 

1894 Barry County Census
Parmelee, Erastus K 84 (287) Caroline,69

Charles,24
Parmelee, Harriet 16 (286)/

Francis,9

Children of Wealthy and Erastus K. Parmelee are:

  1. Orrin M. Parmelee was born ABT 1831 in ,,New York, and died ABT 1862 in Lebanon Twp,Clinton,Michigan. He married Harriet Elizabeth “Elizabeth” WOOD 12 AUG 1855 in Jefferson Twp,Hillsdale,Michigan ( John J.Andridge, Minister), daughter of Charles WOOD and Almira C. LOVEJOY. She was born ABT 1839 in ,Cattaraugus,New York, and died ABT 1908 in North Plains Twp, Ionia, Michigan. Hillsdale census records give her name as “Caroline Wood”.
  2. Alonzo J. Parmelee was born 24 OCT 1835 in New York, and died 4 MAR 1881 in Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan. He married Ophelia Russell 30 SEP 1855 in Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan. She was born ABT 1838 in, Huron, Ohio, and died in Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan.
  3. Erastus K. Parmelee was born 11 OCT 1842 in Seneca, New York, and died 20 JUN 1885 in Orange Twp, Kalkaska,Michigan. He married Mary C. LAFFERTY 25 APR 1868 in Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan. She was born in,Somerset, Pennsylvania. The Hillsdale County marriage index gives his occupation as “lumberman”, and his home as Ransom Twp; his bride is from Jefferson Twp.  He married Ellen Delphine TREMAIN 3 DEC 1872 in Sturgis,St Joseph, Michigan. She was born 20 OCT 1850 in Dundee,Monroe,Michigan, and died 22 DEC 1921 in Summerfield,Monroe,Michigan ;
  4. Elenora Parmelee was born ABT 1843; is possibly a twin of Erastus Jr.

 

Taking the names from the various census, I come up with these possible children for Erastus and his second wife, Caroline:

 

  1. Linus S b. Abt. 1852
  2. Pulaski G. b. Abt. 1855
  3. Marion F.b.Abt. 1859
  4. Wealthy b. Abt. 1861
  5. Charles b. Abt 1869
  6. Harriet b. Abt. 1878
  7. Francis b. Abt. 1885

I am guessing Susan (Cook) (b. Abt. 1845)  and Emma J. (b. Abt. 1847) are the daughters of Caroline by a previous marriage.

The book “Traveling Through Time: A Guide to Michigan’s Historical Markers” By Laura Rose Ashlee states that Erastus had a daughter, “Clara Joels”. The only Clara Joels I can find is the widow of Pulaski Parmelee, Clara (Reynolds) who married Fremont Joel.

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=glines&id=I17277

Frances W. Parmelee

1862-1941

 

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Frances W. Parmelee (Alonzo8,Erastus7,Joshua6,Joshua5,Jehiel4,Joshua3,John2,John1) was born in Ransom Township, Hillsdale County, MI  on 27 Apr 1862 to Ophelia Russell and Alonzo Parmelee. She married Jacob Henry Kroh  3 May 1883 in Ransom, Michigan, and died 05 Jun 1941 at her farm home in Jefferson Township, Hillsdale County, MI. She is buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Hillsdale County.

She was a farm wife, and a member of the Congregational Church. Some sites have her listed as “Francis”, which is traditionally the male spelling.

After her marriage to Henry Kroh, she lived in Jefferson Township, MI. She spent her entire life in Hillsdale County.Her son Alfred and his wife Gladys hosted a grand 50th anniversary celebration for them at their home (14 South Street, Hillsdale, MI) on May 3, 1933. Her granddaughter Ruth noted that Frances baked everything from scratch…cookies, bread, ect., and kept the house spotless.

Frances passed away at home at age 79, due to cerebral hemorrhage and toxic poisoning from bowels and kidneys, according to her daughter, Gladys. Funeral services were at the Miner Funeral Home in Hillsdale, MI.

Frances W. Parmelee Jacob Henry Kroh had twin sons:

  1. Alfred Alonzo Kroh b. 13 Apr 1884 in Hillsdale, Mi m. Gladys Katherine Burdick d. 7 June 1961 in Hillsdale, MI
  2. Wilfred Kroh b. 13 Apr 1884 in Hillsdale, Mi m. Lois Gertrude Kelley d. 17 Sept. 1940

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frances and Jacob Henry Celebrated their 50th Anniversary

 

Lieutenant Jehiel Parmelee

1718-1776

Fought/Died in the Revolutionary War

 

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Lieutenant Jehiel Parmelee (Joshua3,John2,John1) was born June 13, 1718 in Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, to Joshua Parmelee and Hannah DeWolf. He married Mary Royce, daughter of Thomas Royce and Mary Holt. He died the year before his wife Mary on January 15, 1776 in Litchfield, Litchfield County, Connecticut.
Jehiel moved to Wallingford, New Haven County, Connecticut in 1740, then to Farmington around 1759. Later, he moved to Litchfield, where he died. His first children might have been born in Guilford or Wallingford, but their births are recorded at Farmington. Although it is unusual to find births recorded years after the fact, it is not unheard of for a family to move to a new town and have their older children’s births registered when new children are born, so that all records are together.

Jehiel was appointed lieutenant of the train band at Farmington.

 

At the annual Town Meeting, held December 6, 1774, it was Voted, That the Honorable Oliver Wolcott, Esq., and Messrs. Jedediah Strong, Jacob Woodruff, John Marsh, John Osborn, Jehiel Parmelee, Abraham Bradley, Seth Bird, Archibald McNeile, Abraham Kilbourn, Nathan Garnsey, James Morris and Ebenezel- Benton, be a Committee for the Purposes mentioned in the Eleventh Article of the Association Agreement of the Grand Continental Congress in Philadelphia, 5th of September last, and approved, adopted and recommended by the General Assembly of tliis Colony at their session in October last."*

 

 
A brief history of the Parmelee/Welch House Milton Rd area Litchfield CT.

In 1749 Jeremiah Griswold bought 100 acres of Joseph Gilette of Dover NY, This is the main track where the house and barn stand. (Town Records)* Other notes from Walter E. Vail indicate that David Welch owned part of the property along with Jeremiah Griswold as of 1764,

In 1769 Griswold sold the remainder of this tract to Lieutenant Jehiel Parmelee of Farmington with a dwelling house and barn there on (Town Records)

In 1774, Jehiel Parmelee built (or purchased)  the present house*. Most likely on the site of the original house noted before. In 2007, it was determined that the house itself may be the original house noted in the 1769 deed. The construction techniques pre-date 1774. Also the new kitchen-behind house, may have been part of hte original structure determined by the age of the beams, and the marriage marks in the attic rafters, matching those of the main house rafters. According to theMilton Historical Society Group report dated July 15, 1974- The Griswold-Welch- Hart house ca 1765. Milton Road, (is) a full 2 story center chimney  dwelling with hewn overhand, a panelled double front door and windows of 12 over 12 quarrells of glass, original. the Ell was added in 1823 as were the shed extentions and a shop where tin skimmers were made in the 19th century.
Jeremiah Griswold, a dam builder and first settler, owned this land in 1759. He deeded 90 acres, house and barn to Jehil Parmele in 1765 therefore the house was raised sometime between these dates.  Parmele died in 1776 and in 1784 Major David Welch purchased the place as his retirment home. It is situated in the 4th lot in the east tier of the west 100 acres and has remianed in the same family ownership since the 18th century.y. Home of Mrs. Reeves Hart Sr.
Jehiel died of smallpox, caught while nursing his brother on the Revolutionary War battlefield.*
His will was probated: December 10, 1776, Litchfield, Litchfield County, Connecticut.

Children of Jehiel Parmelee and Mary Royce are:

 

  1. Mary Parmelee, b. June 10, 1742, Wallingford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. Unknown; m. John Case, June 17, 1762; b. 1729; d. 1791.
  2. Ensign Joshua Parmelee, b. March 14, 1743/44, Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA; d. June 2, 1780, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA.
  3. Charles Parmelee, b. 1746; d. Aft. 1776.
  4. Hannah Parmelee, b. January 26, 1750/51, Farmington, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA; d. 1781, Waterbury, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; m. Noah Richards;
  5.  Jehiel Parmelee, b. 1752; d. July 17, 1777, Milton. Jehiel was never married, Registered as a Revolutionary Soldier
  6. Ruth Parmelee, b. June 30, 1757; d. Unknown.
  7. Amos Parmelee, b. January 2, 1758, Farmington, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA; Sarah Parmelee, b. 1760; d. Unknown; m. John or Hugh Cotten, July 14
  8.  Joel Parmelee, b. August 29, 1761, Farmington, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA; d. 1799. His name appears on a Revolutionary War 1777 militia roster of Capt. Amos Barnes’ Company, Col. Noadiah Hooker’s Regiment which was raised out of the Farmington-Torrington area. He arrived at camp April 12 and was discharged, allowing five days to return, May 20. An undated 1777 payroll shows that he was paid 3 pounds, 2 shillings, 8 pence for serving one month, 17 days. Detachments from this brigade were placed on duty at various points in the Hudson Valley — White Plains, Crompon, Fishkill, Ft. Montgomery, etc. A roll of Sgt. Aaron Bull’s 3rd Troop, Col. Elisha Sheldon’s Light Dragoons, shows that he enlisted in May, 1778, was 5-foot-6 with dark hair, dark eyes and dark complexion and was a farmer from Litchfield. It states that he was killed Oct. 30, 1778. That summer the regiment was on the Hudson River and in the fall formed part of Gen. Charles Scott’s Light Corps on the lines in Westchester, N.Y. Also serving was his brother Joshua.
  9. Ann Parmelee, b. September 29, 1766; d. Unknown; m. David Collins

 

* Note from the man who runs the “Family Parmelee” website: “jehiel — he’s in joshua’s branch; did not die on the battlefield.  “the chronicles of milton,” pp. 59-60 states that he built what’s now known as the welch-vaill-hart house at 127 saw mill road in 1774 and died at that house. in the “history of cornwall,” p. 166, it states that his entire family had smallpox and the town later bought it as a pest house. … his title comes from being commissioned a lieutenant in the farmington training band in 1760.”

 

While is is possible that Jehiel did not “die on the battlefield” as many websites state, he could indeed have contracted the disease there, and returned home to die. He did die in 1776, as his will was probated on December 10th of that year.

 

*Sketches and chronicles of the town of Litchfield, Connecticut : historical, biographical, and statistical : together with a complete official register of the town”  http://www.archive.org/stream/sketcheschronicl00kilb/sketcheschronicl00kilb_djvu.txt

 

John Parmelee

1584-1659

Immigrant Ancestor

Patriarch of the Parmelees of America

Bricklayer

First Family of Guilford CT

 

John Parmelee (Anne Howell)

John Parmelee  (Hannah Plaine)

Joshua Parmelee (Hannah De Wolf)

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John Parmelee was baptized Sept. 27, 1584, at All Saints, Lewes, England and died Nov. 8, 1659, at New Haven, Conn.He was born after his father  (John Parmelee b.bef. 1554,  d. 01 May 1583, Lewes, England) died; it also looks as if his mother waited a few months to do the christening. His will was probated Jan. 3, 1659/60, at New Haven. He was a bricklayer in England and the patriarch of the North American Parmelee family.

 

John Parmelee was one of the first settlers of Guilford, Connecticut. John Parmelee, Sr., came to America as a passenger on the Saint John. If other members of the family were aboard, they are not on the passenger list. John is listed as 55 years old. He was not the first member of the family to cross the Atlantic, as his son John Parmelee, Jr. had come to New England four years earlier in 1635. The company of settlers on the Saint John was led by the Reverend Henry Whitfield, who had been the rector of St. Margaret’s at Ockley in Surrey since 1616.

They sailed from England on 20 May 1639 under the command of a Captain Richard Russell, and arrived at New Haven (then Quinnipac), Connecticut, between the 10th and 15th of July 1639. While still at sea the settlers organized a single communal plantation; this was outlined in a document now known as the Plantation Covenant. It was signed by twenty five men, John being the fifteenth signer. Although the printed versions of the Covenant use the spelling “Parmelin” for John’s name, it can also be argued that the original was actually spelled “Parmerly.”

 

Guilford, CT Plantation Covenant

We whose names are herein written, intending by God’s gracious permission, to plant ourselves in New England, and if it may be in the southerly part, about Quinpisac [Quinnipiac, later named New Haven], we do faithfully promise each for ourselves and families and those that belong to us, that we will, the Lord assisting us, sit down and join ourselves together in one entire plantation and to be helpful to the other in any common work, according to every man’s ability and as need shall require, and we promise not to desert or leave each other on the plantation but with the consent of the rest, or the greater part of the company, who have entered into this engagement.

As for our gathering together into a church way and the choice officers and members to be joined together in that way, we do refer ourselves until such time as it shall please God to settle us in our plantation.

In witness whereof we subscribe our hands, this first day of June 1639.

 

Robert Bickell/Richell
Abraham Crittenden
John Housingsoe
John Mepham
Wm. Plane
John Bishop
Wm. Crittenden
Thomas Joanes
Thomas Naish
John Stone
Francis Bushnell
Henry Doude
John Jurden
William Noble
Wm. Stone
Francis Chatfield
William Dudley
Henry Kingstone
John Norton
Richd. Sutridge
Thomas Cooke
John Hoadley
Wm. Leete
John Parmarly
Henry Whitfield

 

The village just east of New Haven was settled that fall. John’s  home lot was at the north end of the Village Green, the site now occupied by the 1st Congregational Church. He appeared at a 1647 New Haven hearing to testify about a shoemaker’s shoddy workmanship.

 

John was voted a freeman at Guilford on May 22, 1649. He and his family returned to New Haven, where he was admitted as a freeman there on Aug. 8, 1659.

Will  08 Nov 1659 New Haven, Co, Connecticut

 

The Guilford marriage records of daughters Hannah and Mary do not give their mother Hannah’s name, only John’s.

 

John buried four wives and nine of his thirteen children. It is no wonder he left England to seek a better life.

 

John’s marriages:

 

1)       Anne Howell m.May 15, 1608 in All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England. She died Unknown

2)       Hannah Wilbur m.April 29, 1630 in St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England. She died Bef. February 20, 1633/34 Burial: February 20, 1633/34, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England

3)       Elizabeth Holter m. June 1, 1635, at St. Michael. She was buried there two years later, September 1, 1637, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England

4)       Joane Cobden m. April 3, 1638, at St. Michael. She probably died in England because there is no mention of her in Connecticut

5)       Elizabeth Bradley, widow of Daniel Bradley, whom he married in 1653 at New Haven. She died in January 1683 at New Haven. (Her maiden name may have been SHEAFFE but this has not been proven.) Her third husband was widower John EVARTS whom she married May 27, 1663, at Guilford.

 

The last will and testament of John Parmerly, late of New Haven deceased, was presented, made the 8th of November 1659, proved by the oath of Deacon Lindon and Deacon Peck, at a court held at Newhaven January 3d, 1659/60. The inventory for the will was dated 2 January 1659/60. He left an estate valued at 78 pounds, 13 shillings.

The Will of John Parmely
“Know all men by these presents, I John Parmely of Newhaven being very sicke in body but prfect in minde, doe Institute and ordaine this my last will and Testament in manner and forme following I doe give and bequeathe to my beloued wife Elizabeth Parmely my house-lott and all my whole Estate for her to enjoy and possesse without molestation during the whole time of her life.

“And after her decease I doe give and bequeath half of my house and lott to my sonne, John Parmile of Guilford, the other half, one quarter to my Grandchild Nathaniel Parmile, the sonne of John Parmile of Guilford. And the other quarter part I give to my wife to dispose to her sonne, Stephen [Bradley], if she see cause and for those goods whch shall be left at the dease my will is that my daughter Hannah Johnson the wife of John Johnson of Newhaven, and her dauter Ellen Allan ye wife of John Allen of Newhaven, should have ye greater part equally divided betwixt them and what doth remain I doe leave to her discretion to dispose as she pleaseth.”

 

 

The children of Anne Howell and John Parmelee, baptized at All Saints:

1) John Parmelee, b, d. Unknown. Burial: December 16, 1609, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

2)Johan/Joane Parmelee, Burial: July 30, 1628, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

3)Elizabeth Parmelee, b. Bef. December 3, 1610; d. Bef. February 16, 1612/13.Baptism: December 3, 1610, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England Burial: February 16, 1612/13, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

4)John Parmelee, b. Bef. September 6, 1612, Lewes, Sussex, England; d. January 31, 1686/87/88, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA.

5)George Parmelee, b. Bef. December 11, 1614; d. Bef. April 14, 1615. Baptism: December 11, 1614, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, EnglandBurial: April 14, 1615, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

6)Anne Parmelee, b. Bef. March 17, 1615/16; Baptism: March 17, 1615/16, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

7)Mary Parmelee, b. Bef. June 5, 1620; d. Baptism: June 5, 1620, All Saints, Lewes, Sussex, England

 

From the St. Michael marriage records of April, 1630 (Old Style):

 
Ye 29th John Parmally and Hanna Willbur–both ofthis parish now married (?)ow John was married second on April 29, 1630, at St. Michael to Hannah Wilbur. (See parish entry above.) She was was buried at St. Michael on Feb. 20, 1634

 

Children of John Parmelee and Hannah Wilbur are:

 

1)Hannah Parmelee, b. Bef. May 20, 1632, Baptism: May 20, 1632, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England m. John Johnson, September 30, 1651, New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut

2)Mary Parmelee, b. abt 1634, died March 16, 1667, married at Guilford on Sept. 16, 1660, to Dennis CRAMPTON (1630-1689). They had 3 children.

Children of John Parmelee and Elizabeth Holter (whose records are at St. Michael )are:

 

1) Elizabeth Parmelee, b. Bef. February 1, 1634/35; d. Bef. April 13, 1638.Baptism: February 1, 1634/35, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, EnglandBurial: April 13, 1638, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England

2)John Parmelee, b. Bef. August 30, 1637; d. Bef. December 12, 1637.Baptism: August 30, 1637, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England Burial: December 12, 1637, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England

3)Martha Parmelee, b. Bef. August 30, 1637; d. Bef. September 5, 1637.Baptism: August 30, 1637, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England Burial: September 5, 1637, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England

Child of John Parmelee and Joane Cobden is:

 

1)Rachael Parmelee, b. November 5, 1638; d. Bef. November 10, 1638.Baptism: November 5, 1638, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England Burial: November 10, 1638, St. Michael, Lewes, Sussex, England

 

The burial of Rachael is the last Parmelee entry found thus far in Lewes. John is recorded as having set sail from London the following spring.

 

(also PARMILY, PERMELY, PARMALEE,  PARMELIA or PARMELIN)

 

John Parmelee

1612-1687/88

Drummer, Sexton, Planter

 

John Parmelee  (Hannah Plaine)

Joshua Parmelee (Hannah De Wolf)

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

John(John1) was born in Lewes, England to Anne Howell and John Parmelee in 1612. He was baptized Sept. 6, 1612, at All Saints, Lewes, England.

 

John was first married to Rebecca (Unknown), probably in England. She died Sept. 24 or 29, 1651, at Guillford, CT. (It has not been proven that her maiden name was Eaton) and John died Jan. 31, 1687/88, at Guilford.

 

He was the first member of the family to immigrate to America, arriving four years before his father.

 

“Jo. Palmerley” is listed as a 22-year-old passenger on the Elizabeth and Anne. Master Roger Coop/Cowper/Cooper was at the helm when it left the Port of London on April 13, 1635, and arrived at the Charlestown section of Boston late that spring or early summer. No other family members are listed on that roster. He was one of the original settlers of Guilford, his first home lot being a 1.5-acre parcel on the east side of Crooked Lane, the fourth lot north of Buck Lane.

 

He took the oath of freeman in Guilford on Feb. 14, 1649/50, a little less than a year after his father did. He became the drummer of Guilford’s train band, the colony’s chief defense unit, and served as sexton for many years, “warning” settlers to meetings and church services by beating his drum. His name appears in Guilford’s town records, being sued in 1648 by a fellow planter who complained that John’s hogs had rooted through his corn, and for reporting to train band practice while intoxicated on Jan. 1, 1656/57.

 

John married second Anna Plaine/Plain, the widow of William Plaine/Plain, in Guilford in 1651. William, another signer of the Plantation Covenant, was executed in 1646 in New Haven after being found guilty of sodomy and “corrupting boys.” Anna died and was buried March 30, 1658, at Guilford. John and Anna had no children.

 

John’s third wife was his step-daughter, Hannah Plaine/Plain, the daughter of William and Anna Plaine/Plane, whom he married in February 1658/59. She died Jan. 8, 1687/88, three weeks before her husband’s death.

Child of John Parmelee and Rebecca:

  1. Nathaniel, born in Guilford, Connecticut, in 1645, died in 1676;  married Sarah French on 24 October 1668; removed to  Killingworth, Connecticut; they had 3 children.

The children of John Parmelee and Hannah Plaine/Plain are:

 

  1. 1.        John Parmelee b. Nov. 25, 1659, died March 21 or 27, 1725, at Guilford, married Mary MASON on June 27, 1681, at Guilford. His tombstone can be seen at Guilford’s Alderbrook Cemetery. He had 7 children.
  2. 2.        Joshua Parmelee born about 1661, died in June, 1729, in Guilford, married Elsie/Alse/Alice Edwards on July 10, 1690, at East Guilford; and widow Hannah DeWolf Stone in 1716, at Guilford. He had 13 children.
  3. Caleb Parmelee born about 1663, probably died in 1741, married Abigail JOHNSON on April 11, 1690, at Guilford; Abigail HILL on April 23, 1693, at Guilford, and Mary DURHAM on Jan. 11, 1737/38. NOTE: Many old genealogies state that he died in 1714, but these last two digits may have been transposed, for he can be found buying and selling land with Caleb Jr. from 1724 to 1740. Also, Mary DURHAM is often listed as Caleb Jr.’s third wife but Caleb Jr.’s estate papers refer to Jemima as his widow, and Jemima’s tombstone at Branford calls her the “relict of Caleb.”He had 7 children
  4. Isaac Parmelee b. Nov. 21, 1665, died Jan. 13, 1748/49, at Guilford, married Elizabeth HYLAND/HIGHLAND on Dec. 30, 1689, at Guilford. Their home, the Hyland House, still stands east of the green at Guilford. He had 9 children.
  5. Hannah Parmelee b. Nov. 5, 1667, died —-, married Tahan HILL in November 1688; and Thomas Merrill on May 25, 1693, at Saybrook. To Saybrook. She had 6 children.
  6. Stephen Parmelee born Dec. 6, 1669, died April 4, 1736, at Newtown, married Elizabeth BALDWIN on June 20, 1693, at Guilford. To Newtown where he was the town drummer.He had 11 children.
  7. Job Parmelee born July 31, 1673, died March 6, 1765, at Guilford, married Betty EDWARDS on March 11, 1699, at Guilford. He had 7 children.
  8. Priscilla Parmelee born May 8, 1678, died Dec. 10, 1692, at Guilford.
  9. Joel Parmelee born about 1679/80, died July 20, 1748, at Durham, married Abigail ANDREWS on June 30, 1706, at Durham. To Durham. His tombstone was found at Durham’s Old Cemetery near the top of the hill. He had 11 children.

 

John Jr.’s children make up the major branches of the largest North American Parmelee family. He had at least 74 grandchildren.

After leaving his widow 20 pounds (according to my records, she died first, but just by a matter of weeks, so perhaps he had written the will prior to her death) he divided his home lot between sons John and Joshua; gave his land in Nut Plains, an area just north of the central village, and several other parcels to John; and gave Joshua the land in Nut Plains that he had purchased from John Goodrich. He gave sons Caleb and Isaac 5 pounds each; daughter Hannah 2 pounds; son Stephen 7 pounds, and his other children — Job, Priscilla and Joel 10 pounds each. He also designated that his youngest sons would receive land on the Great Plain when they reached 21, his daughter, when she reached 18. His oldest child, Nathaniel, preceded him in death.

 

 

 

 

Joshua Parmelee

1661-1729

Farmer

 

Joshua Parmelee

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Joshua Parmelee (John2,John1 )was born Abt. 1661 in Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut.He married (1) Alse Edwards July 10, 1690 in Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, , daughter of Thomas Edwards and Abigail ?. She was born in East Hampton, Long Island, New York, USA, and died July 10, 1714. He married (2) Hannah DeWolfe 1716 in Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, daughter of Edward DeWolfe and Rebecca (Alice) Tinker. Hannah was born 1692, and died December 17, 1755 in Wallingford. Joshua died June 13, 1729 in Guilford, New Haven County,

 

He was a farmer. Joshua’s will of June 28, 1727 was probated June 17, 1729 at Guilford and inventoried at 731 pounds, 4 schillings, 7 pence. He directed that his widow, Hannah, receive his house, tools, household goods, and horse barn. After directing that his lands in Guilford be divided equally among his sons, he gave sons Tiorth and David 40 pounds each, son Jonathan 1 pound, daughter Susannah a cow, daughter Ann 5 pounds, and daughter Jeanne 20 pounds. He noted that several of his children had already received their share of his estate while he was alive

NEXT PAGE: John Sr.’s lot at the north end of the Village Green, where the Congregational Church is today, is darkened at the center of the map, as is that of John Jr.’s original property, a little northeast of his father’s.

Also note the lot of William Plain/Plaine, shaded gray on the southwest corner of the green. After he was executed the summer of 1646, his widow, Anna, married John Jr.

She died shortly thereafter and John Jr. then married Hannah Plain/Plaine, his stepdaughter, thereby keeping this property in the family.

Children of Joshua Parmelee and Alse Edwards are:

 

  1. Daniel Parmelee, b. June 28, 1691, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. May 12, 1773, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA.
  2. Suzanne Parmelee, b. January 19, 1692/93; d. Unknown; m. Joshua Stone, May 31, 1716, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; b. 1692; d. 1730.
  3. Ann Parmelee, b. May 8, 1694; d. March 17, 1750/51; m. Isaac Hill, July 5, 1711, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; b. 1685; d. 1738.
  4. Timothy Parmelee, b. August 20, 1695, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. August 11, 1771, Branford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA.
  5. Samuel Parmelee, b. March 31, 1698; d. Unknown; m. Sarah Norton; d. Unknown.
  6. David Parmelee, b. July 20, 1699, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. November 28, 1753.
  7. Jonathan Parmelee, b. June 21, 1701, Middletown, Middlesex County, Connecticut, USA; d. 1772, East Hampton, Long Island, New York, USA.
  8. Jennie Parmelee, b. September 20, 1704; d. Unknown.

Children of Joshua Parmelee and Hannah DeWolfe are:

 

  1. Lieutenant Jehiel Parmelee, b. June 13, 1718, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. January 15, 1776, Litchfield, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA.
  2. Hannah Parmelee, b. January 14, 1719/20; d. December 17, 1755; m. Benjamin Hull, December 17, 1735, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. Unknown.
  3. Charles Parmelee, b. July 3, 1722, Guilford, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA; d. Aft. 1748; m. Elizabeth Ennis, March 3, 1744/45, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; d. November 13, 1748, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Charles is listed on the Pennsylvania muster roll of the company of foot soldiers commanded by Captain John Shannon in September 1746 in King George’s War. He enlisted June 27 of that year as a carpenter.
  4. Lucy Parmelee, b. August 19, 1725; d. Unknown; m. Joseph Parker, February 23, 1742/43, Wallingford; d. Unknown.
  5. Sybilla Parmelee, b. March 29, 1727; d. 1775, Mississippi Territory; m. Ethan Lewis, June 18, 1746, Farmington, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA; b. 1724; d. 1775.
  6. Joel Parmelee (John3, John2, John1) was born 1679 in Durham, Connecticut, USA, and died July 20, 1748 in Durham, Connecticut, USA. He married Abigail Andrews June 30, 1706 in Durham, Connecticut, USA. Served in Revolutionary War.
  7. Elizabeth4 Crampton (Mary3 Parmelee, John2, John1) was born 1662, and died Unknown. She married John Lee. He was born 1657, and died 1711.

 

 

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/a/t/Frank-A-Sattler/GENE2-0004.html

http://www.mayflower.org/

http://www.mfhn.com/MIGenWEb-fgs/

 

 Ensign Joshua Parmelee

1743/44-1780

Revolutionary War

Joshua Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Son of Jehiel Parmelee and Mary Royce, Joshua (Jehiel4,Joshua3,John2,John1) was born 14 Mar 1743/44 in Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut. He married Rebecca (Unknown).  Joshua died June 2, 1780 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut. He was buried in
Calhoun Cemetery Cornwall Litchfield County Connecticut, USA Listed under Parmelle

Headstone of Joshua Parmelee

Served in the Revolutionary War

Joshua Parmelee ,1744-1780 Ensign and sergeant;

of Guilford, Kent and Cornwall, Conn.

Joshua appears as a sergeant on a 1776 roster of Capt. Edward Rogers’ Company from Cornwall, Brig. Gen. James Wadsworth’s Brigade. In this same company, there is another Joshua Parmelee, a private, listed; I wonder if this second man’s name might have been misread as “Jehiel,” Joshua’s brother who died in 1777. His name also appears in an account of 1st Lt. Ambrose Sloper (Capt. Gad Stanley’s 1st Company, Col. Fisher Gay’s 2nd Battalion) for a 3 shillings, 3 pence debit on Dec. 16, 1776. His brother Joel also saw service.

Child of Joshua Parmelee and Rebecca (Unknown)  is:

  1. 1.        Joshua Parmelee, Jr., b. June 2, 1780, Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA; d. 1834.

 

Joshua Parmelee Jr.

1780-1834

Farmer

 

Joshua Parmelee

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Joshua Parmelee, Jr. (Joshua5,Jehiel4,Joshua3,John2,John1)  was born June 2, 1780 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut, to Joshua Parmelee and Rebecca (Unknown). He married Eunice Smith, who was born July 7, 1780 in Massachusetts, USA, and died April 25, 1834.

 

In 1820, he lived in Spafford, Onondaga, New York, and in 1810, he lived in Tully, Onondaga, New York

 

Joshua Parmelee a native of Connecticut, was of New England parentage. The first representatives of the family crossed over from England to America in 1635, fifteen years after the landing of the Pilgrim fathers, and settled in the town of Guilford, Conn., where the family lived for many years, and were regarded as among the solid people of that region. In England they were closely allied to royalty.

 

His father died when Joshua was an infant, and he was reared by his widowed mother. As soon as of suitable years he began an apprenticeship at the tanning and shoemaking business, which, however, not being in accordance with his tastes, he abandoned after serving his time, and engaged in farming. Upon reaching manhood he was married to Miss Eunice Smith, who was a native of Massachusetts, and the daughter of an old and highly respected family, who had been represented in the Bay State for several generations. Joshua Parmelee and his young wife left New England soon after their marriage, and located in Spafford, N. Y., where were born their six children, three sons and three daughters, all of whom lived to be married.

 

All of the sons and one daughter were residents mostly of New York and Michigan.

 

Joshua and Eunice in their later years removed to Cattaraugus County, N. Y., where they spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying at the age of fifty-four years. He was a man of genial and companionable disposition, kindly and hospitable in his nature, and was familiarly known to all the people around as “Uncle Joshua.” His chief characteristics were his honesty and integrity, and his word was considered as good as his bond. The mother survived her husband some years, and died at the home of her daughter, when more than eighty years old. The family on both sides of the house were noted for longevity.

 

Children of Joshua Parmelee and Eunice Smith are:

 

  1. Curtis Parmalee b: 1816 in New York
  2. Joshua Jr. married Cordelia Mosher, buried in Cattaraugus County, N. Y New Albion Lower Cemetery
  3. Erastus K Parmalee b: 22 sept 1809 in Spafford, Onondaga, New York
  4. L. S. PARMELEE b. Aug. 20, 1815 in Spafford, Onondaga, New York ; married, May 3, 1835, to Miss Julia A. Jones He was Justice of the Peace at Reading, minister of the Free-Will Baptist Church, At the time of the building of Hillsdale College, he by his own efforts raised $18,000, and had been the means of erecting many church buildings in the United States and Canada; quite prominent in township affairs, and was Postmaster of Reading for a period of twelve years. He has served as Justice of the Peace six years, and has also officiated as Highway and Street Commissioner, probably for twenty years. In 1867 he was elected to the State Legislature, and while serving his term, he voted for the Fourteenth Amendment* to the United States Constitution. He was on several important committees, alnd was instrumental in securing the right of way of the Ft. Wayne & Jackson Railroad fra through Hillsdale County. In politics, as in religion, he has ever distinguished himself as careful and conscientious, allowing himself to be the tool of no clique or party, but aiming to follow the line of rectitude, whatever might be the result to himself, personally. He distinguished himself as a lively Abolitionist, and was one of the first men to bring the question before the people in this locality.
  5. Rev. Linus S Parmelee,.,of Reading, Mich., was born at Spafford, N. Y., Aug. 20, 1815. His parents were Joshua and Eunice (Smith) Parmelee. May 3, 1835, he was married to Julia A. Jones, and their son, Horatio P. Parmelee, is now a trustee of Hillsdale College, Michigan.

 

*14th Amendment: Its Citizenship Clause provides a broad definition of citizenship that overruled the decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857), which held that blacks could not be citizens of the United States. Its Equal Protection Clause requires each state to provide equal protection under the law to all people within its jurisdiction. This clause later became the basis for Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the Supreme Court decision which precipitated the dismantling of racial segregation in the United States.

Sources:

 

1. Title: 1810 United States Federal Census

Author: Ancestry.com

Publication: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data – United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Third Census of the United States, 1810. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1810. M252, 71

Note:

 

Page: Year: 1810; Census Place: Tully, Onondaga, New York; Roll: 34; Page: 41; Image: 24.00.

Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=1810usfedcenancestry&h=304264&ti=0&indiv=try

Text: Name: Joshua Parmelee

Residence Date: 1810

Residence Place: Tully, Onondaga, New York

 

Note: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1810usfedcenancestry&h=304264&ti=0&indiv=try

2. Title: 1820 United States Federal Census

Author: Ancestry.com

Publication: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data – United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fourth Census of the United States, 1820. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1820. M33, 14

Note:

 

Page: Year: 1820; Census Place: Spafford, Onondaga, New York; Roll: M33_67; Page: 222; Image: 232.

Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=1820usfedcenancestry&h=513159&ti=0&indiv=try

Text: Name: Joshua Parmelee

Residence Date: 1820

Residence Place: Spafford, Onondaga, New York

 

Note: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1820usfedcenancestry&h=513159&ti=0&indiv=try

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=micounty;cc=micounty;q1=Hillsdale%20county;rgn=full%20text;idno=BAD0929.0001.001;didno=BAD0929.0001.001;view=image;seq=00000007

 

 

Wealthy (maiden name unknown)

1809-1849

Married Erastus K. Parmelee

 

Wealthy was born July 12, 1809 in New York. She married Erastus K. Parmelee in Spafford, Onondaga, New York and died December 4, 1849 in Hillsdale, Hillsdale County, Michigan at the age of 40, perhaps in childbirth. Wealthy is buried in Doty Cemetary, Ransom, MI.

 

 

 

1850 Hillsdale Census

 

Alonzo Parmelee                 15    NY              381b  17

Caroline Parmelee              25    NY              381b  15

Elenora Parmelee                 7     NY              381b  19

Erastus K Parmelee            41    NY              381b  14

Erastus K. Jr Parmelee        7     NY              381b  18

Orrin Parmelee                   18    NY              381b  16

 

Wealthy had a great granddaughter named after her. Wilfred Kroh named his daughter Gloria Wealthy Kroh.

Children of Wealthy and Erastus K. Parmelee are:

  1. Orrin M. Parmelee was born ABT 1831 in ,,New York, and died ABT 1862 in Lebanon Twp,Clinton,Michigan. He married Harriet Elizabeth “Elizabeth” WOOD 12 AUG 1855 in Jefferson Twp,Hillsdale,Michigan ( John J.Andridge, Minister), daughter of Charles WOOD and Almira C. LOVEJOY. She was born ABT 1839 in ,Cattaraugus,New York, and died ABT 1908 in North Plains Twp, Ionia, Michigan.
  2. Alonzo J. Parmelee was born 24 OCT 1835 in New York, and died 4 MAR 1881 in Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan. He married Ophelia Russell 30 SEP 1855 in Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan. She was born ABT 1838 in, Huron, Ohio, and died in Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan.
  3. Erastus K. Parmelee, Jr. was born 11 OCT 1842 in ,New York, and died 20 JUN 1885 in Orange Twp,Kalkaska,Michigan. He married Mary C. LAFFERTY 25 APR 1868 in Ransom, Hillsdale, Michigan. She was born in,Somerset, Pennsylvania. He married Ellen Delphine TREMAIN 3 DEC 1872 in Sturgis,St Joseph, Michigan. She was born 20 OCT 1850 in Dundee,Monroe,Michigan, and died 22 DEC 1921 in Summerfield,Monroe,Michigan
  4. Elenora Parmelee was born ABT 1843

http://books.google.com/books?id=yW5ntLrIIvoC&pg=PA766&lpg=PA766&dq=%22Joshua+Parmelee%22%22+Eunice+Smith%22&source=bl&ots=kLBCcvzFZC&sig=nGGAhzKQU-y9PCF_f8Kz6BD7tlQ#v=onepage&q=%22Joshua%20Parmelee%22%22%20Eunice%20Smith%22&f=false

 

 

 

Eleanore Panton

1605-1670

Immigrant Ancestress

Eleanore Panton

John Post

Elizabeth Post

Elizabeth Sperry

Gideon Hotchkiss

Jesse Hotchkiss

Charity Hotchkiss

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Eleanore Panton was born in the year 1605 in Henllan, Denbighshire, Wales. (Some sources say England.) Eleanor married Lt. Stephen Post on 17 Oct 1625 in Hollingbourne, Kent, England. She died on 13 Nov 1670 in Saybrook, CT .

 

Other names she is known under include: Ellen, Ellenor, Elinor, Eleanor, and Pantoni, Pantony (This very interesting name has both English and Irish Ancestry. One William Peutoney of Dublin being granted arms in 1599. However its true origins are French. The Original name holders being from the town of Repentany in France, and being followers of William The Conqueror, were granted the lands of Pontenai (now Poultney) in Leicesteshire. The name has developed many variant spellings including Pentony, Pantony, Pontney, Poutney, Poultney and Pulteneye.)

Children of Eleanore Panton and Stephen Post are:

 

  1. Katherine POST was christened 15 Sep 1627 and died Sep 1694.
  2. John POST b. on 16 Sep 1629 in Otham, Kent, England. m. Hester Hyde on 31 Mar 1652/1653 in Saybrook, CT. He died on 27 Nov 1710 in Norwich, CT
  3. Thomas POST was christened 1 Nov 1631 and died 5 Sep 1701.
  4. Joseph POST was christened 9 Aug 1633 in Otham, Kent, England. He died Sep 1633 in Otham, Kent, England and was buried 3 Sep 1633 in Otham, Kent, England.
  5. Lieutenant Abraham POST was born 1639 and died Mar 1691.

 

Alice Peck

Abt.1626-Abt.1687

Immigrant Ancestress

Alice Peck

Edward DeWolf

Hannah DeWolf

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Alice was born (William1 ) 1625/26 in London to William Peck and his wife Elizabeth Holt. She married Baltazar DeWolfe in Guilford about 1645. She is mentioned in the book “Descendants of Baltazar DeWolf.”  She died in 1687 in Lyme, Connecticut.

 

She was likely the fourth member of her father’s household as recorded by the Early List of Estates published by the New Haven Church in 1640.
Children of Alice Peck and Baltazar DeWolfe are:

 

1.        Edward Nathan DeWolf b 1646 Guilford CT d 1709/10 New London,CT 
2.        Simon DeWolf b ca 1648 Weatherfield, Hartford Co, d 1695 m 11/12/1682 m. Sarah Lay, daughter of John Lay, "a great landowner".
3.        Stephen DeWolf b ca 1650 Weatherfield, d 10/17/1702 Lyme, New London   Co, CT m (1) Sarah Terry abt 1689 (2) Hannah Jones aft 1701 
4.        Mary (Marah)DeWolf b 1/10/1655/1656  Middletown,CT d 10/27/1724 Lyme, New Haven Co. m. as 2nd wife to Thomas Lee of Saybrook, said to have been very attractive. She m. 2 Matthew Griswold, her daughter Hannah Lee m Judge John Griswald, she had Gov. Matthew Griswold, and Phoebe Griswold who m Rev. Jonathan Parsons, ancestor of Blackhal line of Griswold family.
5.        Susanna DeWolf b 12/22/1664 East Saybrook, CT d aft 1735 New Haven  m (1) 1684 Henry Champion m (2) John Huntley 1709
6.        Joseph DeWolf : It apears from Middletown,CT records that  he is the Joseph De Wolf who drowned in a voyage to Antigo, 10/4/1719.  In 12/1742 his widow maried Daniel Merwin of Wallingford, CT.  He m 3/11/1713-4 Elizabeth Hubbard daughter of Richard Hubbard. He moved from Lyme to Middletown, bought land in Middletown, 1714. A son died as an infant, two girls.
7.        Hannah b 1652 Middletown,Middlesex,CT  d 3/28/1712 East Guilford,CT m William Stone 2/20/1673/4  in Guilford,Ct
8.        Daughter De Wolf b 9/5/1661 Middletown, in East Saybrook, New London, Connecticut d aft 9/5/1661 
9.        Alice De Wolf b 1658 Middletown, d 1661.
10.     Peter De Wolf b: ABT. 1670 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut

 

William Peck

1601-1694

Immigrant Ancestor

Deacon

New Haven First Family

William Peck

Alice Peck

Edward DeWolf

Hannah DeWolf

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

 

Deacon William Peck was born November 1, 1601 near London, to Deacon William Peck ( b. 1575, Knoston, Colchester, Essex, England  d. Aft 1619) and Alice Blois. He married Elizabeth Holt. After Elizabeth‘s death in 1683, William married Sarah, widow of William Holt around 1684 and died, October 14, 1694, Burial was at Grove Street Cemetery New Haven, Connecticut.

Inscription on headstone: Here Lyes Deacon William Peck – Aged –93 Decesed  Octobr ye 14 1694

Buried in the New Haven Green — tombstone along the North Wall of the Grove Street Cemetery

William Peck () was a merchant in London and it is believed that he came to America with his wife Elizabeth Holt and young son, Jeremiah on the good ship Hector, arriving in Boston on June 26/27, 1637.

He was an adherent of Rev. John Davenport (1597–1670), a Church of England cleric. Davenport turned more and more to nonconformity, and as pastor of an influential City of London church, he fostered the puritan cause and had to flee to Holland in 1633. There he also had theological troubles. He returned to London, and with Theophilus Eaton, organized a party of puritans which sailed on the ship Hector, arriving at Boston in June 26, 1637. In 1638 Davenport led his colonists to a spot selected by Eaton and the New Haven Colony was founded. Deacon William Peck was among the signers of the Compact of New Haven and a cofounder of the colony. He was also a signer of the Fundamental Agreement of Quinnipiack. The plan of these colonists was to establish a plantation within the limits of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and to found a commercial settlement. They had friends within the Colony and were sympathetic with the principles of Congregationalism.

However they found three major stumbling blocks to their plans when they arrived. First, all the best harbors of Massachusetts had already been occupied, leaving them with no port for their own incoming ships. To share a port with another company would have been unthinkable. They would have had to pay for the privilege, thereby cutting into their own profits, and the owners of the port would have been taking docking facilities from their own ships thereby reducing their own incoming goods.

Second, the Antinomian Controversy with Anne Hutchinson was at its height. The Antinomian Controversy was the denial of the need for Christians to conform with religious or church laws. The current church leaders demanded conformity with the religious laws as a sign of godliness. Anne insisted that true godliness came from inner experience of the Holy Spirit. She also believed that persons under such a covenant of grace might commune directly with God. She was excommunicated by the Boston church in March of 1638 and went to Roger Williams in Rhode Island.

Thirdly, all the positions of power and authority were already filled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The people holding those positions would not step down for new comers, and the new comers wanted the authority to rule their settlement in their own way, according to their own beliefs.

So, even though the people of the Bay Colony courted Rev. Davenport and Easton, to remain and settle with them, Theophilus Eaton looked for another answer to his dreams. Glowing reports of the Northern shore of Long Island Sound reached Massachusetts at this time. The area having just been cleared of the ferocious Pequot Indians in the aftermath of the Pequot War (1637). So in the fall of 1637, Eaton and his group set out to investigate the “promised land”. The group decided to settle at Quinnipiac, later renamed New Haven in the spring of 1638. New Haven was the nation’s very first planned community.

William Peck was an original proprietor of New Haven. He settled there along with Henry and Joseph Peck who were possibly his brothers, but, because they were so much younger, were more than likely his nephews. He signed the Fundamental Agreement of Quinnipiack in 1639 . William is the only one of the three whose name appears in the list of planters and estates which was drawn up in 1640. He was also listed as a freeman on October 29, 1640. Being a freeman meant that he was entitled to vote and hold office. In these early years of the Puritan rule, this meant that you were also a member in good standing of the Congregational Church, since only church members could be recognized as freemen. Henry and Joseph were not declared freemen until about 1645, Joseph did not marry until 1655 and Henry in 1643.

He was one of three who inventoried the estate of Sgt. Thomas Jeffrie in 1661. In December of 1662, at a town meeting in New Haven, Deacon Peck informed those present that the town “elders” were not getting enough to eat — that there was not enough wheat & malt to go around.

Deacon William Peck & another ancestor, Roger Alling, were appointed a Committee of Trustees for a trust that totaled £918 being authorized to direct the affairs of the Collegiate Grammer School in New Haven.

William was deacon of the First Church from 1659 to his death. A portion of their homelot in New Haven was on George Street, while their shop was on the southeasterly side of and fronting on Church Street. Although his estate showed that he was not wealthy, he was highly respected.

While visiting his son, Joseph in  Lyme, he died in 1694. Lyme Vital Records gave his age at death as 93, while New Haven record says 90 years. However, his tombstone gives his age at death as 93 years.

Children of Elizabeth Holt and William Peck are:

  1. Jeremiah Peck,  b. Jan 1621/2/3, London, England  d. 7 Jun 1699, Waterbury, New Haven, CT
  2. Alice Peck, born abt 1625/26 in England, died 1689 in Lyme, NL, CT, married Balthazar DeWolf abt 1645 in Guilford, CT
  3. Elizabeth Peck,   b. 15 Sep 1627, London, England m Unknown Andrews
  4. John Peck,   b. 17 Nov 1638,   d. 1725, Wallingford, New Haven, CT
  5. Joseph Peck,   b. 17 Jan 1640/1,   d. 25 Nov 1718

Other possible children: Eleazer Peck, Benjamin Peck

Sources:
Jacobus, Donald Lines, Families of Ancient New Haven, vol. VI, pp. 1383–1407
Peck Genealogy, Maurice Ellsworth Peck, 1972, p. 19;
Atwater History and Genealogy by Francis Atwater, 1901, page 97;
Mormon family record sheet, including reference to: William Peck Genealogy by Daruis Peck;
“New Haven Genealogical Magazine” by Jacobus, p. 1383–5

The Perkins Family of New Haven

 

Perkins means the son of little Pier, a pet form of Peter (a rock).

The family name Perkins is one of the most distinguished of the ancient world during a time of Kingdoms, Kings and Knights. If we are to believe Bede, the Chronicler of the Saxons, this founding race of England was led by the Saxon General/Commanders Hengist and Horsa and settled in Kent during this time and was a Anglo/Saxon race. However, there is evidence to support the claim that the name is of Celtic/Welsh origin. Based on British history we know that after the last Roman Legions left the continent in the early part of the 5th century the Saxons, Angles and other Low German tribes settled in Southeastern England around Kent. However, the Ancient Britons (Celtics) were the true natives of the area and it is an amalgamation of the Angles, Saxons and Celtic Britons who became what we refer to today as the Anglo/Saxons. The truth is that the Angles and Saxons may have “moved in”, but the Britons were there in far greater numbers, thus accounting for the claim that the blood line is far more Celtic than any other. Therefore it should be concluded that the origins of the Perkins “Clan” are Celtic/Welsh.

By the 13th century the family name Perkins emerged as a notable English family in the county of Leicester, where they were recorded as a family of great antiquity seated as Lords of the manor and estates in that shire. They had branched to Ufton Court in Berkshire and Sutton Coldfield in Warwickshire, later branching to Nuneaton, Marston and Hillmorton, Warwickshire. The main stem of the family continued at Orton Hall in Leicestershire, where it remains to this day. Notable amongst the family at this time was Perkins of Leicester. For the next two or three centuries bearers of the surname Perkins flourished and played a significant role in the political development of England. ”

 

Aaron Perkins

1700-1763

Aaron Perkins

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Aaron Perkins (John2, Edward1) son of John Perkins and Mary (Unknown) was baptized in First Congregational Society, New Haven, on 29 Nov 1700. He married (first), October 2, 1719,  to Silence, daughter of Samuell Humiston and Hannah Johnson.  His second wife was Mary Ailing whom he married December 18. 1723. Aaron died between 31 Jan. 1763 and 31 March 1763

He made his will January 31, 1763, which was admitted to probate March following, and in it he mentions his wife Mary, who is to have the use of his estate during life, and "my daughters" (whose names are not given) are "to share equally in its distribution after her decease." 

Timothy Ball and wife Mary were named executors.The inventory amounted to £95, 13.f. His widow Mary of Amity (now Woodbridge), Conn., left her estate to her daughter Mary, wife of Nicholas Russell of Cheshire, and to the heirs of her daughter Martha Brooks. 

He seems to have left no children by his first wife. He died in 1763. His widow married for her second husband Nicholas Russell, Sr. (her daughter Mary’s father-in-law), June 7, 1733. 

Interesting video about First Congregational Church where Aaron was baptized can be seen here:
http://www.newhavencenterchurch.org/video/ccnh_silver_video.swf

Proper behavior on church meeting days was very important and the General Court in Hartford decreed in 1721 “That each town at their annual meetings in December shall choose two or more tythingmen in each parish or society for divine worship within said town, who shall forthwidth be sworn to a faithful discharge of work hereby allotted to them; or if they neglect or refuse to take said oath shall pay a fine of forty shillings into treasury of said town.” Their duties were “to carefully inspect the behavior of all persons on the Sabbath …” to determine if they make any “prophanation of worship.”

The fine for offenses was five shillings and if the payment was not made the offender was publicly whipped. John Barnes and Joseph Cooper were the first appointees. A second, and larger, meeting house was built in 1739 (as shown on the previous page).

The Congregational Church was the early center of the colony and the minister’s salary was voted by the New Haven town meeting until 1667 and church attendance was mandatory. Unlike the Connecticut Colony, where every male could vote, in New Haven only church members could vote. This changed when New Haven had to join Connecticut in 1662. Other churches began and by 1708 everyone could worship as they wanted but they still had to pay a tax toward the Congregational Church.

Children of Aaron Perkins and Mary Alling, born and/or baptized at New Haven:

 

  1. Aaron Perkins b. 6 May 1725; died before 1763
  2. Rachel Perkins b. 3 Mar 1726/7;
  3. Martha Perkins bp 20 Aug 1728, m. at Woodbridge 15 Sep 1748 Moses Brooks;
  4. (probably) Moses, bp. 11 Sep 1731; and
  5. Mary Perkins, bp. 22 Sep 1734, d. 4 FEb 1806 at Cheshire, m. at New Haven 26 Jul 1757 married Nicholas Russell.
  6. Martha; married Moses Brooks

The Descendants of Edward Perkins of New Haven, Conn.

929.2 , P4l8p I 1148919 GENEALOGY COLLECTION ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

Edward Perkins

1625-Abt 1679

Immigrant Ancestor

Farmer


Edward Perkins

John Perkins

Aaron Perkins

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Edward Perkins, (Pirkines) the immigrant ancestor of this branch of the Perkins family was probably born in Hillmorton, Warwick, England about 1625 or 1626.. He was the son of Thomas Perkins and Mary Bates. Hillmorton was a village that has now been absorbed by the City of Rugby. It is located between Leicester, Coventry and Northampton.The date of his arrival in this country is unknown at present.

There are no records when Edward moved to New Haven, Connecticut, but he took the oath of fidelity there on October 18, 1648. This was ten years after the town was first settled. He married Elizabeth Butcher on March 20, 1649. He died in 1688 in New Haven.

The first appearance of his name on record is when he took the oath of fidelity, October 18, 1648, as an inhabitant of New Haven, Conn., where, perhaps, he had resided some time previous. The earliest mention of his name after this on the New Haven records is in a volume of miscellaneous transactions or "Estate Settlements," page 226, dated November 3, 1657, when as a planter he makes deposition : "That in the Spring last he sewed about 2 acres of Pease in his lott, and after they were come up Ther came in hoggs at Stendman's fence and spoyled them — so that he had not above two bushels of pease of them ; but he then got the damage viewed by John Coop*" and Samuel Whitehead, who judged his loss at least six bushels of pease, which he hath demanded of Mr. Stendham." 

In 1685 he and his three sons were entered as proprietors of the common lands. 

February 26, 1679, he deeds to his son John 22 acres on the west side of the town bounded east on John Benham, west on John Smith, south and north on a lane at 
each end. 

The Perkins family were members of the New Haven church. Unlike the Puritan churches of Massachusetts, it was not a requirement of the New Haven colonists to belong to the church. His seat was in front of the soldiers row.

 January 25, 1687-8, he made a deed of gift to son Jonathan of a dwelling house and several parcels of land.  Same date, he gives son John a house "where T lately dwelt," and several pieces of land. On the same date, a deed of C"-' gift to son David of 4 acres in the suburbs quarter. 

These last three conveyances seem to indicate that the patriarch, conscious that he was drawing near the close of his earthly career, deemed it best and proper to bestow upon his family what remained of his estate during life.This evidently was the only will he ever made, as none can be found on record and is the latest approximation to the date of his decease.

The children of Edward Perkins and Elisabeth Butcher were:
  1. John Perkins, born Aug. 18, 1651 in New Haven and died before 1730 m. Mary (Unknown)
  2. Mehitable Perkins, born Sept. 21, 1652.
  3. Jonathan Perkins, born Nov. 12, 1653.
4.        David Perkins, born Oct. 3, 1656; Died: 27 OCT 1732 in New Haven, CT Spouses: Deliverance Bliss; Sarah Johnson

John Perkins
1651-Bef 1730
Farmer
 

John Perkins

Aaron Perkins

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh
 
John Perkins (Edward1), son of Edward Perkins  and Mary (Unknown) was born in New Haven August 18, 1651, and died before 1730; no will or settlement of his estate, which he probably had disposed of to his children during his life, is to be found upon record while there is apparent evidence of the latter fact. He was a farmer. 

December 26, 1681, he sold to John Smith of New Haven the 22 acres on the west side of the town he had received from his father February 26, 1679. March 24, 1701, he conveys by deed of gift to son John 21 acres bounded on land of his brothers David and Jonathan. September 18, 1705, he gave by deed to his son Peter one-third of my father, Edward Perkins, dec'd, estate, in 3rd division ; also 2 acres arable land in Sperry's Plain. 

September 28, 1710, he bought of David Johnson, blacksmith, a small piece of land bounded in part on Stephen Perkins. February 24, 1715-16, he buys of his neighbor Moses Sperry five feet of land. October 23, 1718, he sells to son Nathan 4 acres in his third pitch. December 8, 1718, he conveys to his cousin (nephew) Seth Perkins (son of his brother Jonathan), weaver, three-fourths of an acre bounded on the town street, 
Jona Perkins, channel of the creek and heirs of Jas. Chidsey, March 26, 1722, he conveys to son Peter by deed of gift two acres adjoining land of said Peter. April 5, 1722, he also conveys to son Aaron by deed of gift one acre within the field called Yorkshire quarter, it being part of the meadow lying between my brother Jonathan and my own land ; also one-half of my 5th division joining Wallingford bounds. 

He married, first, May 16, 1677, Mary ; second, in 1703, Rebecca Thompson, daughter of John Thompson of East Haven, and widow of Daniel Thomas. There were no children by his second wife. 

In 1727, a conservator was appointed for John Perkins and his wife Rebecca. 

The children of John Perkins and Mary (Unknown) were: 

1.        John Perkins Born June 3, 1678. 
2.        Stephen Perkins Born April 7, 1680. 
3.        Peter Perkins Born May 18, 1682 ; Died Feb. 14, 1738-9. 
4.        James Perkins Born Aug. 23, 1684; Probably Died Young. 
5.        Elisha Perkins 
6.        Mary Perkins Born Oct. 9, 1689; Married Abraham Tomlinson Of Derby; Died 1747. 
7.        Aaron Perkins was christened on 29 Nov. 1700 in New Haven.  He married (first), October 2, 1719, to Silence, daughter of Samuell Humiston and Hannah (Johnson), who was born February 7. 1690-1, and in 1763.  His second wife was Mary Ailing whom he married December 18. 1723.He died between 31 Jan. 1763 and 31 March 1763

 
 
Mary Perkins
1734-1806
Mother of Eight

Mary Perkins

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Mary Perkins (Aaron3,John2,Edward1), was born 22 Sep 1734 to Aaron Perkins and Mary Alling. She was married in New Haven 26 Jul 1757 to Nicholas Russell. She died 4 Feb 1806 at Cheshire, New Haven, Ct.

 

 

<Polonaise Gown 1780’s

With the repeal of the English laws against the wearing and selling of cotton goods in 1774, imported cottons became fashionable for all levels of society. Hand painted or printed cottons from India and the Far East were expensive and this led to the English cotton trade making cheaper versions of the imported goods.  This gown may have been described as a ‘long Polonaise’ since the skirt could be worn trailing on the ground or pulled up.

Recipe for Wedding Cake Circa 1747

Take four Pound of Flower well dried and sifted, seven Pound of Currants washed and rubb’d, six Pound of the best fresh Butter, two Pound of Jordan Almonds blanched, and beaten with Orange Flower Water and Sack till they are fine, then take four Pound of Eggs, put half the Whites away, three Pound of double refin’d Sugar beaten and sifted, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace, the same of Cloves and Cinnamon, three large Nutmegs, all beaten fine, a little Ginger, half a Pint of Sack, half a Pint of right French Brandy, Sweetmeats to your liking, they must be Orange, Lemon, and Citron. Work your Butter to a Cream with your Hands before any of your Ingredients are in, then put in your Sugar, mix it well together; let your Eggs be well beat, and strain’d thro’ a Sieve, work in your Almonds first, then put in your Eggs, beat them all together till they look white and thick, then put in your Sack and Brandy and Spices, and shake your Flour in by Degrees, and when your Oven is ready, put in your Currants and Sweetmeats as you put it in your hoop; it will take four Hours baking in a quick Oven, you must keep it beaten with your Hand all the while you are mixing of it, and when your Currants are well wash’d and clean’d, let them be kept before the Fire, so that they may go warm into your Cake. This Quantity will bake best in two Hoops.

 

Children of Nicholas Russell and Mary Perkins are:

 

  1. Riverus Russell, b. Mar 30, 1756, Woodbridge, New Haven, Ct; d. Mar 07, 1834, near Linwood, York, Livingston, Ny. m. Charity Hotchkiss
  2. Betty Russell, b. Apr 06, 1758, Woodbridge, New Haven, Ct.
  3. Elmore Russell, b. Feb 14, 1761, Woodbridge, New Haven, Ct; d. Mar 17, 1835, Windson, Broome Co., Ny.
  4. Aaron Russell, b. Jan 27, 1766, Cheshire, New Haven, Ct; d. Jul 05, 1779, Killed By British, In New Haven, Ct.
  5. Moses Perkins Russell, b. Aug 07, 1768, Cheshire, New Haven, Ct; m. Mary Johnson.
  6. Eleanor Polly Russell b. Apr 19, 1771, Wallingford Twp., New Haven, Ct.
  7. Moses Russell, b. Oct 18, 1773, Cheshire, Wallingford, New Haven, Ct; d. Jun 12, 1857, Cheshire, New Haven, Ct; m. Mary Johnson, Abt. 1796; b. Abt. 1775, Cheshire, New Haven, Ct; d. Aug 20, 1856, Cheshire, New Haven, Ct.
  8. John Russell, b. Sep 07, 1775; d. Sep 22, 1859; m. (1) Ruth ???, abt. 1792; m. (2) Mary ???, Abt. 1839.

 

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Tree #0694, Date of Import: Aug 25, 2003]

 

Edmund Perry

1587/88- Aft. 1671

Immigrant Ancestor, Leading Quaker,

Author

Edmund Perry

Hannah Perry

Deborah Dillingham
Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Edmund (AKA Edward) Perry was born on Jan 27, 1587/88 in Devonshire England, the son of John Perry and Judith Vassell or Henrici Perrye and Richarda Platyr. Edmund married Sarah Crowell (another source says Sarah Betts), (b. abt. 1592 in County Devonshire, England daughter of John Crowell and Elishua [Unknown] ), in 1613 in Bidford Devonshire England. He died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass.

Edmund was the Great Great Grandfather of Nathanael Green, who was one of the most trusted generals of the Revolutionary army. Nathanael was George Washington’s friend and comrade-in-arms.

Left: Nathanael Green

Edmund Perry, a Quaker, came from Devonshire, England, to Sandwich, Massachusetts, and wrote “A Railing Against the Court of Plymouth,” dated January 1, 1676, and for doing so was heavily fined. His son immigrated to Rhode Island.

It is reported that Edmund was an immigrant in 1637. Edmund became the leading Quaker in the traumatic persecution period, a dedicated and respected clerk of the Meeting after 1672, and author of Quaker literature.

According to a book about one of Edmund’s decendants (The Life of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry), and another, “Four American Naval Heroes: Paul Jones, Oliver H. Perry, Admiral Farragut, Admiral Dewey: A Book for Young Americans”, “Edmund was born in Devonshire, and immigrated in about 1630. He is described as “a gentleman of education and considerable literary attainments”. He was a member of the Society of Friends (Quakers), and one of their public speakers. He was persecuted for his beliefs under Cromwell (who was a Puritan) and emigrated from England, to Plymouth, and from there moved to Rhode Island. In another book, it was his son who moved to RI, which I think is more likely, as all accounts (other than those who say he never came at all) say he died in MA.There seem to be many differing accounts as to the history of Edmund Perry.

Most researchers indicate that all ten of his childrenwere born in Devonshire between 1613 and 1634. Some researchers have Edmund’s death at 1636 (age 49) in Plymouth, Mass. An alternate story is that Edmund died in England about 1636 and his widow Sarah Crowell Perry, brought five of their youngtest children to America including Ezra, Edward, Margaret, Deborah and probably Anthony. That would take a strong woman to come to America so early in our countrys development. They settled in Sandwich, Massachusetts in the Plymoth colony on Cape Cod. Sarah was a Quaker and came from Bridford, Devonshire, England. Some researchers have reported that Ezra Edward, Margaret, Deborah and Anthony were born in Massachusetts. If their births were in America it would argue for Edmund and Sarah coming to America in about 1624 and having five more children with Edmund dying in 1636.

He was a Friend of decidedly militant turn of mind. He preached the doctrines of peace, with the spirit of war, to the Protector’s troops. Oliver, not wishing this, made it convenient for Edmund Perry to leave England. By settling at Sandwich in 1653, then the headquarters of the Friends in America, he took early and vigorous part in “the Quaker invasion of Massachusetts.”

In 1654, Edward/ Edmund Perry was fined for conduct unacceptable to the established church… Edward Perry was one of many colonists whose religious beliefs differed from the majority view. About 1657, he joined the newly formed Society of Friends. Regularly throughout the years his name appeared in the court records. In 1658, 1659, and 1660 he and other Quakers were fined for refusing the oath of fidelity. In 1659 he was fined for “using threatning speeches” to the marshall. In 1663 he was called to account for a “rayling letter which hee wrote to the Court”. Nevertheless, he was respected enough to be appointed to share in community duties. In 1671 he and his son (2384) Ezra Perry Sr. were to view the damage done to the Indians by the “Horses and Hoggs of the English” and he and James Skiffe were appointed to “have inspection of the ordinaries”.

Children of Edmund Perry and Sarah Crowell are:

  1. Arthur Perry, tailor, born 1615; died in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, 9 October 1652; married in 1636, Elizabeth Crowell, daughter of John and Elishua (Yelverton) Crowell, born about 1625; died in Boston, 22 February 1698. Arthur was town drummer; one of the original members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company (1638); freeman (13 May 1640). By wife Elizabeth he had Elishua (1637), Seth (1639), John (1642), Elizabeth (1647), Sarah (1647), and Deborah (1649). See Savage, 3:399.
  2. John Perry, born in Devon, England, 1616; died 21 September 1642 (Stafford, CServe message, 21 April 1997). Note, however, that there was a John Perry rated as able to bear arms in Taunton in 1643 (NEHGR 4:259) and a John Perry who died in Watertown in 1674, age 61 (NEHGR 38:73).
  3. William Perry, born 1620; died about 1693; married Susanna Carver, daughter of Richard and Grace Carver. Appears to have been a resident of Scituate from 1637 and of Marshfield from 1657. A recurrent error has this William and/or Thomas Perry married to Sarah Stedman, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Stedman. However, as shown by Robert S. Wakefield in “The Family of Isaac Stedman of Scituate and Muddy River, Massachusetts,” TAG (July 1994), pp. 155-159, this Sarah actually married Samuel Perry, son of John and Anne (Newman) Perry. Susanna Carver emigrated with her parents from Norfolk County, England, to Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1637.
  4. Elizabeth Perry, born about 1622; married John Hanchett.
  5. Margaret Perry, born in Devon, 1623; died in Sandwich, 5 November 1688; married Edmond Freeman, 18 July 1651. Edmond Freeman was Deputy to the General Court for Sandwich (1666-1673) and Assistant to the Governor, 1666-1686 and 1689-1691.
  6. Anthony Perry born in Devon, 1625; died in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, 1 March 1683; married Elizabeth Perry in 1646. Grand Juryman, May 1654; on a committee to buy Joseph Peck’s house to make it fit for the ministry, 2 November 1663; constable for Rehoboth, 1665 (Peirce’s Colonial Lists. Civil, Military and Professional Lists of Plymouth and Rhode Island Colonies); received one share of the land granted to Rehoboth by Plymouth Colony Court on 10 April 1666 (Bowen, Early Rehoboth, VI, 40-41); on a committee to finish the meeting house (1678) and then to sell it (1680); Deputy to the Court, 1673; Surveyor of Highways for Rehoboth, 1679 (Pierce’s Colonial List); Townsman, 8 May 1680. Representative to the General Court in Boston; made a donation of £14 2d to “Phillips War.”
  7. Ezra Perry born in Devon, England, 1627; died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts, 16 October 1689, the day he made his will; married in Sandwich, 12 February 1652, Elizabeth Burgess
  8. Edward Perry born in Devon, 1630; died in Sandwich, 16 February 1695; married Mary Freeman (1631-1695). Progenitor of Naval heroes – Captain Oliver Hazard Perry, Commodore Matthew Perry, and others.
  9. 9.        Hannah Perry born 1632; died in Sandwich, 9 June 1673; married Henry Dillingham, 24 June 1652. Hannah and her husband are supposed to have been Quakers.
  10. Margaret Perry born in Devon, 1623; died in Sandwich, 5 November 1688; married Edmond Freeman, 18 July 1651. Edmond Freeman was Deputy to the General Court for Sandwich (1666-1673) and Assistant to the Governor, 1666-1686 and 1689-1691.
  11. Deborah Perry born in Devon, 28 November 1634; died in Sandwich, 14 October 1665; married Robert Harper, 9 May 1654, in Sandwich.

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=aoo6mIN7FuAC&pg=PA15&lpg=PA15&dq=edmund+perry+quaker&source=bl&ots=cWJxgVId0E&sig=qNhTye3gCqfO9htiVqYv_BZZGV0&hl=en&ei=j8SgTICaHc-RnAeckN3NDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBoQ6AEwATgK#v=onepage&q=edmund%20perry%20quaker&f=false

A genealogist at the NEHGS suggested  that it could be a corrupted spelling for Edward. Edward is one of Edmund‘s sons.
http://www.familyhistorypages.com/Perry.htm#EdP

Edmund is in these bibliography texts; Register 115, 86+
Elwell H. Perry, “Perry Genealogy”, New Bedford, 1979
Edward Perry, PCR III, 46,47,52.
Rev. C. B. Perry, “The Perrys of R.I. & Tales of Silver Creek”, NY 1913.
Sarah Perry, PCR III, 163
Quaker Writings, Deyo 174.

Genealogical and family history of southern New York and the Hudson River Valley: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation, Volume 3

Four American Naval Heroes: Paul Jones, Oliver H. Perry, Admiral Farragut, Admiral Dewey: A Book for Young Americans

 

Hannah Perry

Abt. 1630-1673
Immigrant Ancestress

Hannah Perry

Deborah Dillingham
Edward Wing

Hannah Wing

Samuel Mosher

Ruth Mosher

Israel Shepard

Hanna L. Shepard

Jacob Henry Kroh

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

Hannah (Edmund1  )was born in 1632 in England, Bridford, Devon, England, daughter of Edmund Perry and Sarah Crowell She married Henry Dillingham at Sandwich, Plymouth Colony, on 24 June 1652. Hannah Perry died on 9 June 1673 at Sandwich, PC.

 

                                                                            Pine Tree Shillings>

 

Because the English would not allow it’s colonies to mint coins, New Englanders took matters into their own hands and the Massachusetts bay Colony illegally began minting operations.

In 1652 a coin was struck, one side of which bore the image of a tree. Often a pine, but sometimes an oak or willow, these coins have come to be known as Pine Tree Shillings.

The cookies of that name are the size of a shilling. Was it defiance or a sense of humor that made colonists decorate the cookie by pressing the coin into the dough?

 

1/2 cup light molasses
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup lard
1 1/2 cup all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

In a mixing bowl cream together molasses, brown sugar and lard. Stir together flour cinnamon, baking soda, and ginger. Blend into creamed mixture. Divide into 6 portions. On lightly floured surface shape into 6 10-inch long rolls. Wrap and chill for several hours. Slice into pieces a little more than 1/4-inch thick. Place on well greased cookie sheet. Press each cookie with thumb until about 1/8-inch thick. Bake 350 about 5 to 8 minutes. Makes about 8 dozen.

Children of Hannah Perry and Henry Dillingham are:

 

  1. Mary Dillingham b. 23 Dec 1653, d. a Aug 1702
  2. John Dillingham (II) b. 24 Feb 1658, d. 11 Sep 1746
  3. Deborah Dillingham b. 21 Feb 1660, d. Sandwich, Barnstable, MA, after 1731
  4. Edward Dillingham b. 21 Apr 1665, d. 28 Mar 1739

Margaret Picke (Pickett/Picket)

1598-1655

Immigrant Ancestress

Margaret Picke

Ellen Harrison

Mary Thompson

Sarah Cooper

Elizabeth Munson

Nicholas Russell

Riverus Russell

Riverus (Verus) Russell, Jr.

Ophelia Russell

Frances Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Margaret Picke (1) was born 1598 in West Kirby, Cheshire, England to Thomas Picke and (Unknown); married Richard Harrison on  28 Jul 1619 Marr Place West Kirby, Cheshire, England ,died 25 Oct 1655 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

 

July 14, 1619 Marriage license says, “Richard Harrison and Margaret Picke, Spinster, Parish of West Kirby, Chesh. At West Kirby”. (Marriage licenses granted within the archdeaconry of Chester in …, Volume 56  By Church of England. Diocese of Chester)

 

Whatever religious significance they attributed to marriage, all the colonies recognized it as a civil contract based on mutual consent of both parties. Husbands had to support and cohabit with their wives. Deserters were hounded and errant husbands hauled into court for adultery or for failing to provide. Early court records reveal many such cases. Especially in New England, where authorities kept a watchful eye, both husbands and wives often received reprimands for misconduct.

The colonies limited or outlawed physical abuse of wives. In 1641, for instance, Massachusetts prohibited wife beating unless it be in his own defense upon her assault. In the Southern colonies, laws prevented husband from inflicting death or permanent injury on their partners. So Colonial wives enjoyed legal protection (in principle, at least) that was denied to their counterparts in England. But laws obviously could not end desertion or domestic strife. (One only has to read abstracts from Colonial newspapers advertisements to learn this.)

Colonial wives also benefited from antenuptial and postnuptial contracts. Used in England only by the rich, the contracts served here to help preserve domestic peace and to keep wives and children off the public dole. Antenuptial contracts  many of these appear in old court records  let a woman retain control over her own property. Postnuptial contracts could reconcile a couple in dispute or enable them to separate (although the contracts usually compelled the husband to continue supporting the family).

Divorces, which we frequently assume never occurred in earlier times, were granted. The Puritans, no less, fostered this major innovation in New England. It was a great change from the laws of their homeland: In England, marriage was sacramental and indissoluble. Only the wealthy could dissolve marriages through annulments or acts of parliament. New Englanders most frequently obtained divorces for desertion, bigamy, adultery, and failure to provide. Women received divorces more often than men. However, far more women petitioned for divorce than received one.

 

Children of Richard Harrison and Margaret Picke are:

  1. Richard Harrison: Born 1620 And Died 1686.
  2. Ellen Harrison Was Christened 1 27 Dec 1621 In West Kirby, Cheshire, England. She Died Dec 1621 In West Kirby, Cheshire, England And Was Buried 2 28 Dec 1621 In West Kirby, Cheshire, England.
  3. Margaret Harrison Was Born 1624 In West Kirby, Cheshire, England. She Died 1 Apr 1627 In West Kirby, Cheshire, England And Was Buried 20 Apr 1627 In West Kirby, Cheshire, England.
  4. Elizabeth Harrison Was Christened 21 May 1626 And Died After 5 Nov 1675.
  5. Ensign Thomas Harrison Was Christened 2 Dec 1627 And Died 1704.
  6. Ellen Harrison Was Blessed 25 Mar 1630 Birth Place West Kirby, Cheshire, England m. John Thompson, (born 1613) on  25 Feb 1650 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, d. 8 Apr 169024 Apr 1621
  7. Samuel Harrison Was Born 1632 And Died 1705.
  8. Mary Harrison Was Born 1634.

Hanna Plaine

1638-1687/88

Hannah Plaine

Joshua Parmelee (Hannah De Wolf)

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

Hanna (William)was the daughter of William Plaine/Plain/Plane and Anna Plum. Hanna was born in England in 1638. Hanna married her step-father, John Parmelee in February 1658/59. She died Jan. 8, 1687/88, three weeks before her husband’s death.

 

Hannah’s father was executed when she was eight years old.

 

Left: The Meeting house at Guliford, CT in 1638.

 

The children of John Parmelee and Hannah Plaine/Plain are:

 

  1. 1.        John Parmelee b. Nov. 25, 1659, died March 21 or 27, 1725, at Guilford, married Mary MASON on June 27, 1681, at Guilford. His tombstone can be seen at Guilford’s Alderbrook Cemetery. He had 7 children.
  2. 2.        Joshua Parmelee born about 1661, died in June, 1729, in Guilford, married Elsie/Alse/Alice Edwards on July 10, 1690, at East Guilford; and widow Hannah DeWolf Stone in 1716, at Guilford. He had 13 children.
  3. Caleb Parmelee born about 1663, probably died in 1741, married Abigail JOHNSON on April 11, 1690, at Guilford; Abigail HILL on April 23, 1693, at Guilford, and Mary DURHAM on Jan. 11, 1737/38. NOTE: Many old genealogies state that he died in 1714, but these last two digits may have been transposed, for he can be found buying and selling land with Caleb Jr. from 1724 to 1740. Also, Mary DURHAM is often listed as Caleb Jr.’s third wife but Caleb Jr.’s estate papers refer to Jemima as his widow, and Jemima’s tombstone at Branford calls her the “relict of Caleb.”He had 7 children
  4. Isaac Parmelee b. Nov. 21, 1665, died Jan. 13, 1748/49, at Guilford, married Elizabeth HYLAND/HIGHLAND on Dec. 30, 1689, at Guilford. Their home, the Hyland House, still stands east of the green at Guilford. He had 9 children.
  5. Hannah Parmelee b. Nov. 5, 1667, died —-, married Tahan HILL in November 1688; and Thomas Merrill on May 25, 1693, at Saybrook. To Saybrook. She had 6 children.
  6. Stephen Parmelee born Dec. 6, 1669, died April 4, 1736, at Newtown, married Elizabeth BALDWIN on June 20, 1693, at Guilford. To Newtown where he was the town drummer.He had 11 children.
  7. Job Parmelee born July 31, 1673, died March 6, 1765, at Guilford, married Betty EDWARDS on March 11, 1699, at Guilford. He had 7 children.
  8. Priscilla Parmelee born May 8, 1678, died Dec. 10, 1692, at Guilford.
  9. Joel Parmelee born about 1679/80, died July 20, 1748, at Durham, married Abigail ANDREWS on June 30, 1706, at Durham. To Durham. His tombstone was found at Durham’s Old Cemetery near the top of the hill. He had 11 children.

 

 

Colonial Families of by MacKenzie, Vol. III, pg.386.
6/13/90, LDS Film # 0207355 was she the daughter of Wm. Plane and Anna(N
1268);
Talcot’s Early Families of Guilford, Conn. pg.945;
3/11/91, FHC Ancestral File, WILCOXS1;

 

 

William Plaine

1590-1646

Immigrant Ancestor

First Person Executed in New Haven

William Plaine

Hannah Plaine

Joshua Parmelee (Hannah De Wolf)

Jehiel Parmelee

Joshua Parmelee (Rebecca)

Joshua Parmelee (Eunice smith)

Erastus K Parmelee

Alonzo T. Parmelee

Frances W. Parmelee

Alfred Alonzo Kroh

 

William Plaine was born in England in about 1590. He married Anna Plum and died in 1649.

 

In 1639, Plaine had been a signer of the Covenant in which the first Guilford settlers, while still aboard ship bound for New England, promised, “the Lord assisting,” to be helpful to each other “in every common work, according to every man’s ability and as need shall require.” They had also promised “not to desert … each other,” without the consent of the majority of the signers. The organization and membership of the church was left until actual settlement. Plaine was assigned a home lot of two acres, and, in 1645, was appointed by the Town Council to build the dam for the Town Mill, and to inspect chimneys as a fire precaution-responsibilities suggesting he was a trusted resident of Guilford. But the following year various charges were brought against him.

 

In 1649 William became the first person executed in New Haven after being found guilty of sodomy and “corrupting boys.”

“[A] leud, prophane, corrupting, incorridgable pson